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owen bush

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owen bush last won the day on June 16

owen bush had the most liked content!

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About owen bush

  • Birthday 06/25/1971

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    http://www.owenbush.co.uk
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    London England
  • Interests
    Profesional smith ,More and more I am interested in the history of out craft ,It just drags me back .

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  1. no powder in it its much simpler than that .......
  2. I have been using an 8mm radius as the edge. A parallel cutter works better than a wedge, it’s only the cutting edge doing the work. Material thickness and heat when you cut will have a great deal of influence on the final pattern. I’ve only done it 5 times though! So I’m still at the learning stage!
  3. Thanks Alan. pretty is the idea (and part of the function!). thats the cool part of this , lots of ways of coming out with a different take on stuff...I have a few other ideas brewing at the mo that I hope will be more gobsmacking! things taken from other places applied to standard stuff...we shall see! I also have hit a few dead ends with very promising but ultimately impossible patterns!
  4. I have been playing with feather patterns recently, started up looking at illerup idal blade fern patterns and later evolved to a feather pattern , trying to get a stand alone feather...Its been fun. and has lots of spin offs running in my mind. firy , flamy frondy stuff!
  5. On the single edged swords a lot are one piece....and somthing to remember about the way the pommel and tang are aligned is that the tand does not go into the center of the pummel it is often misaligned so this needs to ke taken itto account this also means the tang is not central to the handle....
  6. Nice, I have a few British and german anvils with gates. I found that hot forging worked well for making tooling fit the slot and for making wedges that fit perfectly. basically heat the bottom of the tooling and sledge it down into the slot . the heat the wedge and upset it to fit the gap. You will have fun with that anvil.
  7. I use between 3 and 10lb of propane a hour for one gas forge depending on the forge . I hget a huge amount of work done with my gig welding forge (that gets through a 47KG bottle a day. when I used coke I used to use a lot more 100kg+ for a heavy days foerge welding. but its half the price so the over all cost is the same. A gas forge can be very eficient if it is made for a single purpose and has doors matche dtoy your work. the more versatile it is the less eficient it is ..
  8. owen bush

    Hack silver

    I would guess its knife or axe and hammer and then a whole lot of haggling!
  9. I make and sell dogs head hammers so I am probably biased and I like to use them. my 3 favorite hammers are all dogs head hammers 2 old saw doctors ones and one of mine. However hammers do not "do" anything for the user....from a completly practicle POV hammers are jsut a lump of metal used to transfer energy into the steel. 2lb is 2lb whether its a dogs head or rounding hammer. The actual diferences are subtle. some hammer shapes such as croos pein or diagonal pein ball pein have obvious diferences between how the hammer head shapes the metal. but when it comes to a flat faced hammer or slightly crowned flat faced hammer then the diferences between a round , squarw or octagonal mflat face are subtle. and its the same with a dogs head. I prefer to use them for blade work, and I am used to them now they can be a little odd to start with. They are not a general use hammer and do not do some of the directional forging that can be done with the corners of a short faced rounding hammer because they become less stable when tilted on their side. however for flattening steel they would be my go to. There is also definatly a little "badging" that goes on with a dogs head hammer being a bladesmiths hammer not a blacksmith hammer...and I am guilty of this as well. I love hand made hammers and use some made by my friends and I love car boot sale hammer heads for 50 Pence as well. some people love only one hammer ...I am not a Hammernogamous guy!
  10. well 6 years on (time really flys) I do almost all of my billet welding in a gas forge without any flux. It is certainly a better process. the dis advantage is some grinding... it takes longer in total time than when folding under the hammer , but is slightly less "work time" if you do not count time hreating. however the welds are certainly better and not using borax is sooooooo much better for my health and forge! the only time I now personally use flux is when teaching hand forge welding or for final welds on multi bar billets...I can do small ones fluxless but use flux when the billet is longer than the forge.... its a great improvement.....big thanks to JD and others who put this out there...
  11. I wish I could make it this year.... But I will most certainly be back.
  12. Well, I have found myself grinding on the edges of my platten to get a smaller contact area on the belt to get more pressure on the belt to remove more material....I enquired about getting 1" belts and making a 1" platten but my supplier cant do that and I'm not sure how sensible putting 10hp through a 1" belt is and Then I thought why not have the platten ground so that there is a smaller contact area in the middle of the belt. I got James Wood who was working here to grind a couple of faces the full length of the platten recessed back about 2mm or so so now I have a faceted plattern 2/3" in the center and 2/3" flats either side the full length top to bottom so I han grind hard left side , hard middle middle orhard right side with minimal contact area anu get the full width of belt used up and hog away. it works very well..finish is not quite as good but its more agressive and allows better use of the 24grit ceramica I use.
  13. I am running a 10hp grinder as fast as the belts will allow hogging on a faceted platten (smaller contact area) but I turn it right down when I get to tips or tricky grinding. get it wrong at full speed and the metal or you will get eaten!
  14. It sure does look that way!
  15. Ill dig some out, I must have 8 or ten of these anvils now.
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