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Paul Lemasters

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About Paul Lemasters

  • Birthday 01/21/1960

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Middlebourne WV
  • Interests
    Hunting, fishing, trapping, reloading
  1. Good idea. Well thought out. Crackerjack machining too! Very well executed fit and finish. I like it a lot.
  2. Looks like maybe a red oak with what the sawyer in the sawmill I used to work in called " wind shake " He said it was caused by a wind that caused the trunk to twist, causing a partial separation of the grain structure, which healed back together. Don't know if he was right, but it sounds feasible to me. Wind damage as a young tree which caused the pattern you see as the tree aged and grew. Used to see some real pretty patterns in the logs we sawed up. Wish I could have saved some of it. Dry it SLOW! Get it stabilized professionally, and you'll have some beautiful material to work with.
  3. Stay safe and make sure you bring everything back you took over.
  4. Correct. Once they get a taste of your poultry, they'll usually clean you out, and not consume 99% of it. Just killing to be killing. Ounce for ounce, probably one of the most ferocious critters on the planet.
  5. Well done. I, too, like the curly maple, as well.
  6. Turned out real good. Are you going to use the same material for the paring knife handle-kinda like a matched set for her? Gotta love natural wood like maple. Looks so much better than a synthetic handle material.
  7. Excellent! A very classy job, indeed.
  8. Better save the one with the magic in it for your most difficult projects. No sense burning up all your big ju-ju all at once. Save it for a difficult project when you REALLY need it
  9. I echo the sentiments of Bro. Hoffman. Tubal Cain would be proud, indeed.
  10. Just musing out loud, but I'm curious as to how the current would flow through powder, as opposed to a homogenous piece of metal. Never seen anything like it, and just wondering if consistent results would be as easily obtained in loose material vs. solid material. Make sense? If it's doable it looks promising. And kinda dangerous. And kinda neat/interesting, ya know.
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