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Svet

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Everything posted by Svet

  1. Good and pretty looking blade. Is it monosteel? Also what kind of steel is it made of?
  2. Back to the open air shop. The blade is cut from its mother bar and extra forged to shape. The shaped sword, ready for filing. The blade was filed ad roughly sanded. Now it is iaki-ire time. The ingredients of my clay formula. I didn't add iron filings this time. Didn't have them in big amounts. Everything is squashed into a smooth paste. Then the clay coat is applied to the filed and cleaned blade. The quenching water tank - it is about 1 meter away from the forge. I wanted to shoot a video of the iaki-ire but I couldn't attach my camera to anything suitable. Here is a shot of the forge a minute before I did the quench. I will post photos of the finished blade as soon as I have the time to apply the polish. To be continued.
  3. Svet

    First forged one

    This knife is made of one piece of high carbon steel and then diff hardened. You can barely see the hamon but it is there and quite narrow. I believe that the narrow hamon on Japanese kitchen knives helped for increasing the flexibility of the blade as a whole because kitchen knife work often requires holding the blade in a bent aside position.
  4. Svet

    First forged one

    Neat! This is one of the coolest kitchen knives I've seen. I especially like the narrow hamon. Japanese Chef's knives have a narrow hamon as a general rule, so your hamon is completely in the norm. Check out these traditional Japanese kitchen knives, they all sport a really narrow hamon - only several milimeters wide: http://www.nihonto.ca/hocho You don't even have to be cautious when sharpening the edge. The hamon will not get grinded off in the next centuries.
  5. For some odd reason I don't see a photo in your post, Mr. Gugliotta.
  6. Svet

    Mother and son

    True, true. The only inaccuracy is that it generates 2300 decibels of noise. It could also be used for fire-fighting purposes, if dipped in water. Seriously, this cleaner is older than me (and I am 26 yo). It still works without any problems. I have bad memories from my childhood remembering my fingers getting sucked into its hose. The swelling took 1 week to cure. Ouch, it still hurts...
  7. Fantastic! :You_Rock_Emoticon:
  8. Svet

    Mother and son

    Yep, the youngster was a great helper. He did the annealing for me. Oh, and yes - never allow a tender thing like this get too close to a Soviet vacuum cleaner!
  9. Svet

    Mother and son

    These two little fellows were assisting me while I was forging this blade.
  10. Nice! Very neat indeed. Cable steel is the ultimate choice for heavy duty cutters.
  11. By the way, I will be glad if you guys share your opinions on this blade's future style. I mean, what blade shape (Hira-Zukuri, Shobu-Zukuri, Moroha-Zukuri, etc) you think will look best on a Sunnobi Tanto. Taste is a personal thing, I know, but still I may gather people's opinions and make the final decision based on what I get from you. Also, if you have any questions, feel free to ask. Thanks!
  12. Thanks, Tyler. The forge is just aligned bricks and a pipe but it really does the job. I am starting to like it better than my city forge. I will try to keep this thread going and will keep updating it with info and pics until the sword is completely finished.
  13. Hello guys, I spend two days at my villa (country house? don't know the word in English) and I used the time to forge a blade in the Japanese style. I finnaly got charcoal from my supplier and my innitial idea was to make a Cable Damascus hunting knife or a Texas-style bowie but the cable turned out to be with a soft pack-thread core and I abandoned the idea. For now. Besides the steel cable, I also took a neat round 3/4'' bar of 1060 with me and I am glad that I did. I had to build a simple brick forge - you can see it working on the video. I used refractory bricks for the chamber and normal bricks for the outer part. No mortar, just well aligned bricks. I equiped it with an old Soviet vacuum cleaner and a pipe with holes for the inner part. Since I didn't have an anvil at my villa, I had to use a railroad rail that was lying around - works fine if we don't count the narrow working surface. The forging to the sunobe-sugata stage (roughly shaped blade) took me one whole day. Check out the photos and the video below. NOTE: The images are hosted on Imageshack.us and not on this forum, so no traffic will be generated. The materials. The cable and the borax were not used in the making of the blade. Just the bar of 1060 and the bag of charcoal. A close-up of the charcoal - pretty big pieces, eh? The heating & forging begin. A close-up of my forge's chamber. The bar is being drawn and shaped. Innitial stage. A close-up of the roughly forged bar, lying on the railroad rail anvil. And finally it is done. The rough blade with the kissaki and the nakago forged. Still attached to the mother bar of 1060. And the VIDEO showing my simple charcoal forge. I built it in about 30 minutes. Gets really freaking hot since its chamber is completely closed and there's no opening for the heat to escape from. NOTE: To be able to download the video right-click on the link and then "Save as". Will finish the blade when I get back to the villa. To be continued.
  14. Svet

    Twisting Cable

    Yes of course, sure.It is always good to hammer the cable in the direction of the twirls, not only rely on twisting. Actually, it is kind of obligatory. As a matter of fact the majority of bladesmiths start with the hammer job and skip twisting. Works fine if you have the experience but a pre-twist is always a good precaution. Saves a lot of unpleasant surprises. If I have the time and opportunity, ina few weeks I may write a little pictorial on cable damascus. Maybe a video too.
  15. Svet

    Twisting Cable

    What me miller and B. Norris said - twisting the cable helps tighten the welds and fill the gaps and voids. It also helps squeeze out all the oxides, flux and dirt (if any). Also, twisting welds the strings of the cable to each other - you can get a pretty solid billet out of the cable using twisting only. Extremely high and even temperature is very important. Good flux job too. Try not to overdo twisting since you can tear some of the strings apart if you're too pushy.
  16. One word: FANTASTIC!!! :You_Rock_Emoticon:
  17. Thanks, Mr. Fogg. I got it now - seems that disk grinder is used for the same purposes as the belt grinder. Still, I think that a powerful angle grinder (say 2 hp) with a sand paper disc can be a good substitute for a stationary disk grinder. Saves space in the shop, at the least. Will try to perfect my beveling skills practicing on the one I have.
  18. Hi guys, I saw this thread: http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=5368 and I was wondering what is the disk grinder used for? I've never used one and I am not much of a grinder guy - prefer to do stock removal using files. So, what is the idea behind the disk grinder? Is it a full substitute for a belt grinder? Can it be used for applying sharp bevels on a blade? Why not just use a normal rotary bench griner instead? Or why not use an angle grinder attached to a vice? (that's what I do sometimes because angle grinders go to high RPM speds). I am mostly interested in the applications of a disk grinder (or should it be a disk "snader"?) Thanks!
  19. I am looking for free plans for building a homebuilt (DIY) rolling mill. Any tips, advices or tricks are welcome as well. Thanks guys!
  20. Very nice tutorial, Mariano. And kick-ass blades too. Unique and original concept on the stone age blades! This is not some everyday stuff you're making there. :You_Rock_Emoticon:
  21. Sure, that's what I am using for Jap-styled stuff. I started this thread because I have plenty of the spring stuff and because I remember seeing somewhere on the net photos of 5160 blades that had a pretty decent hamon. Can't find the pics, though. Those hamons were etch-enhanced (not etch-painted) but this is a common method and is widely used on simple carbon steel blades too. Still, it appears that it's better not to use spring steel for making anything else but hunting knives. Thanks, guys!
  22. I have made a few hunting knives out of spring steel (through hardened) but I have never tried doing a diff hardening on spring steels. The Chromium makes it deep hardening and many people complain that it's almost impossible to get a decent hamon out of 5160 or the other Chromium-allyed steels. At the same time, there are lots of bladesmiths that recommend spring steel even for Japanese-style blades (and the good Hamon on those is essential). So, do you guys use spring steel for Japanes-styled blades? If yes, please share your methods for getting a good and traditional looking hamon on a spring steel blade. I want to give it a try since I have about 10 truck spring leaves that will be enough to suit my bladesmithing needs till the day I die. Photos of your spring steel hamons (or simply good spring steel hamon photos) are much appreciated! Thanks!
  23. Svet

    Hamon & Light boxes

    Thank you, guys! Seems that I need a light box with black interior walls. What about scanning short blades (using an ordinary PC scanner)? Any pros and cons? Any tricks and tips? Thanks! PS: Hey Jeff, that's a cool animal you have on your avatar! Got the full size pic?
  24. Hi guys! This is my first post in the forum. I decided to share a couple of photos of a hira-zukuri tanto blade I made several months ago. The blade is in basic polish. I apologize for the photos being that bad. I even had to remove a strong yellow tang in PhotoShop. It has always been a problem for me to take good detailed shots of the hamon and my crappy camera is not the only thing causing the problem. Are there any light box set-ups that are better for shooting hamon than others? Should the interior walls of a "hamon" light box be black as contrary to the white walls of most light boxes? Do you think that scanning works better than the light box for small blades like tantos or short knives? Thanks, guys!
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