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Ariel Salaverria

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Posts posted by Ariel Salaverria

  1. This is how I make the lanyard damascus beads you see on my knives/website.

     

    Cutting a 1/2" x 5/8" damascus square section bar I've made for this

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads1.jpg

     

     

    Some future beads cutted

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads2.jpg

     

     

    Drilling a piece with a 5.5mm bit

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads3.jpg

     

     

    Drilled piece

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads4.jpg

     

     

    Threading it (1/4")

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads5.jpg

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads6.jpg

     

     

    Screwed into a 1/4" threaded bar

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads7.jpg

     

     

    Shaping the bead with a 60 grit belt

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads8.jpg

     

     

    Roughly shaped

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads9.jpg

     

     

    Now I'm gonna screw the bead into a screw to which I previously removed the head

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads10.jpg

     

     

    I then place this into the bench drill

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads11.jpg

     

     

    Finishing the shape with grit 80, then 150, then 220 and then 400

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads12.jpg

     

     

    Polishing it to a mirror finish

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads13.jpg

     

     

    Mirror polished bead

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads14.jpg

     

     

    Supported with a bended wire, I then put the bead in a solution of 70% Ferric Chloride and 30% distilled water, for a minute, to check the damascus patterns.

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads15.jpg

     

     

    Once I check out it's OK, I leave it there for 45 minutes to get properly etched.

     

    tutorialdamascusbeads16.jpg

     

     

    Pictures of these same finished beads tomorrow :)

     

     

     

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    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

  2. This is why I haven't posted any knives yet since I came back from my vacations.

     

    Using a 1 HP bench grinder, an X-Y table gift from knifemaker friend of mine Alberto Trujillo and a magnetic plate (16" x 6") I bought, I've build the supporting structure and got a surface grinder for my shop!

     

    Now I can not only work more efficiently but also don't burn my fingers when working on small pieces :D

     

     

    Here's a video:

     

    th_surfacegrinder1.jpg

     

    As you can see, with my left hand I operate the X axis, while with my right hand I control the Z axis. Y axis is controlled with the rotative screw that you can see here:

     

    surfacegrinder1.jpg

     

    When I turn that to the right, the grinder goes down (And viceversa, of course)

     

     

    How a future blade looks after getting rid of the forging surface residue.

    I'm using a 46 grit stone, but you can also use belts.

     

    surfacegrinder2.jpg

     

     

    I ground the spine and etched in acid to see exactly where the center steel.

     

    surfacegrinder3.jpg

     

    Then kept on surface grinding.

     

    th_surfacegrinder2.jpg

     

     

    And here's how it looks roughly ground.

    You can see the magnetic plate handle, to the right is not engaged.

     

    surfacegrinder4.jpg

     

     

     

     

    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

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  3. Beware of the tactical kettle!

    Now I just need to teflon coat it :D

     

    Some skills come in handy when we got asked to repair household items.... :P

     

    Thumbnails are clickable. A pop up window will appear with a full res picture

     

    pava1.jpg

     

    pava2.jpg

     

    pava3.jpg

     

    pava4.jpg

     

    pava5.jpg

     

    pava6.jpg

     

     

    Here's the story :)

     

    It's an old kettle a friend bought at a flea market for cheap as it didn't have those parts and I've made those for him.

     

    It's a really nice kettle from older days, very thick metal that can take an abuse, not like the cheap paper thin ones we get lately around here (unless you go designer and pay top cash for it)

     

    Now he has a robust and interesting piece to make tea :D

     

    Ariel

     

     

    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

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  4. Well, I had to make like 3 blades until we get something that both Ruben and I were comfortable with (he'll pick up the rest of the project on his end now) and I didn't have time to take pictures of the HT process for the collaboration folder blade.

     

    That said, as I got a spare blade from this project, I've decided I'm gonna make a friction folder out of it. My first folder ever.

     

    And I did take pictures of the HT for this one.

     

    I picked up the use of potatoes for this type of projects when I was working on the Argentina train company many years ago. Sometimes flat screwdriver's tips get broken, and since we couldn't just order more, we forged the tip to proper shape again. And in order for the handle not to get burned or melted, we stucked a potato or two in there. They dissipate the heat very well and it's a really low tech and cost solution that just works.

     

    I would estimate that the non exposed blade part get to aprox 200C, not more. Since I'm using 5160 for the blade and I've been working with it for a long time, I already know the exact color the steel gets (light red) to the needed temperature (840C)

     

    Thumbnails are clickable. A pop up window will appear with a full res picture

     

     

    Preparing the potato of the right size to receive the blade.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze40.jpg

     

     

    Presenting the blade in place.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze41.jpg

     

     

    Securing the blade in place with some wire.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze42.jpg

     

     

    Getting the torch ready.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze43.jpg

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze44.jpg

     

     

    Starting to heat the blade.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze45.jpg

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze46.jpg

     

     

    Exposed part of the blade gets red hot and ready to go.

    Just don't take the exact color of this picture as there are lots of variables involved.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze47.jpg

     

     

    Quenching it in 60-80C degrees oil.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze48.jpg

     

     

    Resulting piece.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze49.jpg

     

     

    Cleaned up blade.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze50.jpg

     

     

    Second HT session (C degrees)

    I place the entire blade here, as there's no problem with the bronze.

     

    tutorialchainsawbronze51.jpg

     

     

    Finished blade.

    9cm (3.5") long, 7cm (2.75") edge, 2cm (0.8") wide and 3mm (0.12") thick.

    Already tempered, drilled, ready to go :D

     

    frictionblade1.jpg

     

    frictionblade2.jpg

     

     

    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

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  5. I wanted to make something different than the first ones I've made, so I came up with these.

     

    This one is 4 1/2" long in my traditional san mai damascus. Leather lanyard with a stag bead and a simple sheath to protect it.

     

    1bottleopener1.jpg

     

     

     

    Now the second one is 93mm (3.66") long, 13mm (0.51") wide and 6mm (0.23") thick.

    Traditional san mai damascus too, but heat annodized. Also a leather lanyard with a stag bead and a simple sheath to protect it.

     

    2bottleopener3.jpg

     

    2bottleopener4.jpg

     

     

    See how it changes colors depending on the light.

     

     

    2bottleopener12.jpg

     

     

    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

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  6. Mitch,

     

    On some books I remember reading that steels with more than 0.6% of Carbon aren't gonna weld properly with a regular process, but when you add a simple cannister to the mix, you don't have any kind of problems. They will weld 100% properly.

     

    Welding those two steels together wouldn't probably make a nice pattern, as they have a very similar Carbon content, you'd get white-ish lines on the places of contact due to the decarbirization that will ensue on the welding.

     

    The hardest steels to weld together are the stainless ones, due to the high Cromium content, and even then, if you use the proper cannister techniques, it can be done, either stainless with carbon or between them.

     

     

    Ariel

  7. I love the look of that wood mixed with your damascus, damn that is cool together.

    Sam, that's not wood, it's some really cool Orange and Black raggish micarta (if I may say so myself) I've made recently :D

     

    Here are some similar pieces:

     

    micarta20.jpg

     

     

    Backside, just one piece polished.

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta21.jpg

     

    Other non polished two pieces

     

    micarta22.jpg

     

    Other side

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta23.jpg

     

    Links to close ups:

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta24.jpg

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta25.jpg

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta26.jpg

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta27.jpg

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta28.jpg

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta29.jpg

     

    Another one and a piece for a hidden tang knife.

     

    micarta28.jpg

     

    Close up of the hidden tang piece:

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/images15/micarta29.jpg

     

     

     

     

    Wwhat steel did you use to sandwich the 5160?

    Just the chainsaw, which is 52100, 1070 and some high speed tool steel from the M series.

     

     

    Ariel

  8. Now here's a piece different than what I usually make :)

     

    San Mai damascus in chainsaw with a 5160 core.

    Overall length is 12" with a 7" cutting edge.

    Orange/black raggish micarta (made by myself, as always) handle.

    It'll have a handmade leather sheath in the style the buyer desires.

     

    kardcriollo1.jpg

     

    kardcriollo3.jpg

     

    kardcriollo6.jpg

     

    More pictures here:

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/docs/knives.htm

     

    (If you stumble on this post once that knife gets sold, just check the Gallery pages on my website, the knife will be there :) )

     

     

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    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

  9. A custom order from a customer in Brazil, based on a knife I've made in the past :)

     

    San Mai damascus in 1010/1070 with a 5160 core.

    Tapered butt-end. Overall length is 7 1/4" with a 3" cutting edge.

    White/black micarta (made by myself, as always) handles.

    It'll have a handmade leather sheath.

     

    sanmaiutility1.jpg

     

    sanmaiutility3.jpg

     

    sanmaiutility6.jpg

     

     

    More pics:

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/docs/gallery.htm

     

    Sign up for my Newsletter:

    http://server.com/WebApps/mail-list-subscribe.cgi?list=79955

     

     

    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

  10. San Mai damascus in 1010/1070 with a 5160 core.

    Overall length is 8" with a 3 1/2" cutting edge. 3 3/4" from tip of the blade to the handles. 1/8" thickness.

    Deer stag handles. Lanyard tube. Leather lanyard with a 1010/1070 damascus bead.

     

     

    nessmuks1.jpg

     

    nessmuks2.jpg

     

     

    For more pictures, please visit this page of my website:

    http://www.aescustomknives.com.ar/docs/pro_nessmuk.htm

     

     

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    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

  11. How about a mokume one for the ladies to make a change? :D

     

    Mokume (nickel silver and copper)

     

    1.3" (33 mm) total length, .78" (20 mm) from horn to horn, .137" (3,5 mm) thickness.

    The silver plated chain measures 15 3/4" (40 cm) extended.

     

    1mokumependant1.jpg

     

    1mokumependant2.jpg

     

    1mokumependant3.jpg

     

     

    Another angle.

     

    1mokumependant4.jpg

     

    1mokumependant5.jpg

     

     

    For size reference.

     

    1mokumependant6.jpg

     

    1mokumependant7.jpg

     

    1mokumependant8.jpg

     

     

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    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

  12. Just finished for a customer.

     

    San mai damascus from 1010/1070 with a 5160 core.

    4 3/4" overall length, 2 1/2" blade. 5/32" thickness. Mokume handle slabs and lanyard bead. Cable pins.

     

    It'll have a leather sheath with a clip for pocket carry that I'm making next week :)

     

    sanmaineckero1.jpg

     

    sanmaineckero2.jpg

     

    sanmaineckero3.jpg

     

    sanmaineckero4.jpg

     

     

    Sign up for my Newsletter:

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    Thanks for looking!

     

     

    Ariel

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