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Don Abbott

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Don Abbott last won the day on October 7

Don Abbott had the most liked content!

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Tennessee / foothills of the Smoky Mountains
  • Interests
    the Gospel, my wife, blacksmithing, bladesmithing, primitive archery, and F&I War reenactment

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  1. By shop built, I assume you mean built by an individual from parts or a kit? As far as price, I'd have to test it first. I have seen excellent machines built by individuals, but have also seen some cruddy ones. If someone has built something and says it's good, they're obligated to prove it. One of the primary thing I would look at is the tracking. I think anybody could tweak one to run a straight belt at idle, but what happens when you put some pressure on it? As far as resale, it would depend on where you're located (cross-country shipping would be expensive), demand,
  2. But Jerrod is. Seriously. Pay careful attention to any advice or comment he might offer.
  3. Think about this like we do architecture: The ancient Greeks built some awesome buildings. This was Greek architecture. The Victorians thought Greek architecture was really cool, so they incorporated some of the elements into theirs. This was Greek Revival architecture. I think a lot of us could be classified Colonial Revivalists or Frontier Revivalists. We aren't reproducing artifacts, but the vibe is definitely there. And it's fun.
  4. You can get into an Ameibrade for right around 2k. I got one a couple weeks ago and it is great. I got the 2hp 220V variable speed, so you could get in for less. I want to do a more formal review on it, but I'm bogged down on a commission job right now but hope to be free in a week or two. I have been able to use it enough to appreciate it and have no regrets. Plus my wife was all for it, so that was a win-win.
  5. I really look forward to getting a review on your new equipment.
  6. You're fixing to open a can of worms here... you might just want to step back real easy like Just kidding of course, but this is a very broad topic... very interesting, but can be very frustrating. I have been pretty deep in the historic reenactment community in times past. The rule of the day is "primary documentation". This generally means that the recorded history, the archeology, and the material culture will agree on an objects use and existence in a particular time period. That said, we have to be real careful with a lot of the stuff that came out of the 70's and 80's. Inspi
  7. I know little or nothing about chef's knives, but I had to comment on the last picture in particular. I love to see distal taper in the tang. It's one more thing that adds time and complicates the process, but done right it is well worth it. Yours looks very well done. Glad you etched it first too.
  8. I'd like to take credit for something creative and unusual, but it's actually just file teeth! It is solid. In it's first life it was part of a switch for high-voltage power lines. I love the look of copper. I love to polish copper when it's finished. But I hate shaping big pieces of copper. It gums bits and files and abrasives and anything else you can throw at it. And you get about ten seconds on a grinder until it is too hot to hold. I always swear off of it until I see it finished, then I think it's not so bad.
  9. I know everyone has blades they forged and maybe even heat treated laying around waiting for inspiration to finish them out. I've got blades that have been waiting ten years or more. Here are three of a batch of four I finished up a while back. I sold the forth one without getting a picture, and it was probably the best looking of the lot. This is the big one... 1084, copper, and stag: This is the middle one. 1084, copper, and stag: And this is the baby of the bunch. I don't know how long
  10. Or, if you're going to stick with the granite plate, start with a coarser grit. Go to Home Depot and get some of the purple 3M paper in 80 and 120. I know this sounds backward, but you and go from 80 to 120 petty quick with some serious stock removal. Then on to your fine grits.
  11. That's great. I catch Tod weekly. I enjoy his channel very much. I've been into archery for years. Interesting when your internet worlds collide.
  12. That's a lot of knowledge in the first six pictures. Wish I could have been there.
  13. Seven grand-ish and you can start lovin'
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