Jump to content

Dave Stephens

Super Administrators
  • Posts

    4,264
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    49

Dave Stephens last won the day on August 4 2023

Dave Stephens had the most liked content!

Reputation

524 Excellent

About Dave Stephens

  • Birthday 01/18/1972

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://stephensforge.com
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Anchorage, AK

Recent Profile Visitors

13,282 profile views
  1. Sorry it took me too long to see this. Jim: Your books are some of the foundation stones of this craft in modern times. I say, go for it absolutely. But . . . Don't just show the audience techniques, tell them stories. How'd you get started? What was it like when you first published and other bladesmith's accused you of leaking "secrets." Tell us about you biggest mistakes . . . the swords that shattered on quench, etc. and the lessons learned. Tell us about your interaction with other foundational smiths. Tell us why you keep doing this hot, dangerous dirty work year after year. Why keeps you at the fire after all these years? The world is filled with fakes, with people pretending to be people who they think other people will like or click on or whatever. Your authenticity will differentiate you from the other channels. Also, don't try to make it look professional. Buy a $20 tripod for your iPhone and record that way. Any idiot can download filters to make their channel look like a 1990's professional TV studio. Raw, unfiltered, unedited, and authentic. Anyway . . .that's what I think. Grins, Dave
  2. I love it! Great, elegant pattern.
  3. Is there a close up of the blade? Is that a non-ferrous layer in the blade? Dave
  4. Pretty cool Ulu interpretation! Looks like a comfortable rocking chopper/dicer. Dave
  5. Cool trick with the hose clamps on the rotary tool! Stealing that.
  6. Here's a trick I use to get thin, parallel lines onto guards and such. Put a cutoff wheel from a dremel in a drill press or milling machine. Clamp a small square of aluminum or other material in the mill vise to act as the "bench" Lower the head of the mill/drill until the edge of the cutoff wheel is as high off the bench as you want the line inset on the piece. Keep the piece flat on the bench and slowly rotate it into the wheel. I have a picture of this somewhere on one of my posts. I'll try to find it. It really help if you can slow the speed of the spindle down. Dave -- Found it!
  7. Looks great. Love the dedication. Thanks for sharing!
  8. Thanks Alan. Sure appreciate your years of service to the forum!
×
×
  • Create New...