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Dave Stephens

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Everything posted by Dave Stephens

  1. Happy to see this complete! The scabbard fittings kick a lot of ass. Hey, I think we're about to see a renaissance here guys. It's the apocalypse. Swordsmiths are going to be very, very popular! I'm bullish on bladesmithing! Grins, Dave
  2. Michael Bergstrom, the talented film producer and bladesmith who generously provided the filming of AF 2016 has recently released new videos from that event. He added them to the announcement topic, but I thought I'd post a new topic so you all didn't miss them. For those of you that don't know, AF 2016 was in two parts. Each smith did a practical demonstration of technique, and another presentation on the theme of the event, Grendel's Hoard from Beowulf. The demo videos have been out for about a year. Michael is now working to release the thematic presentations. Here
  3. All: It's been about two years since the death of my father. He died unexpectedly and suddenly. Him and I were working on our jointly owned boat in Cordova, Ak and he got a stomach ache. A few days later he was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. Ten days later he died. We had a few days to say goodbye. The very last beer I shared with my Dad was sitting on the flying bridge of his Boat in what was going to be his retirement home in Florida. I asked him what he wanted done at his funeral. In my Dad's characteristic humor he said he wanted me to build a Viking shi
  4. Glad you enjoyed it, Josh. Yes, Morris is an invisible hand that greatly impacts our craft, in my opinion. He was central in first championing the dignity and worth of hand made objects (and those who made them). If I had to pick an impossible utopian world to live in, it would be his novel "News from Nowhere," which depicts a world in which there is but one rule: You have to make something (grow it, build it, etc.) and then give it away. It wouldn't work, of course. But it's a lovely vision. Thanks for listening! Dave
  5. Episode 7 is live. This one might interest you guys. It features the wisdom of Don Fogg, swords, beheadings, and discussion of the father of the craftsmanship movement in the West, William Morris. The poem is called, "The Haystack in the Floods," and it's a 19th century rendition of scene from the late Medieval during the 100 years war between France and England. Enjoy! https://www.buzzsprout.com/admin/episodes/1679107-episode-7-the-haystack-in-the-floods-by-william-morris
  6. Pinned for fear this might slip beneath the first page and therefore easy reference.
  7. Thanks Josh! Episode 6, for those who might be interested, is Hemingway's short story: "A Clean Well-Lighted Place," and is themed around the contemplation of death (or at least non-existence). https://www.buzzsprout.com/admin/episodes/1470508-episode-6-a-clean-well-lighted-place-by-earnest-hemingway
  8. Thanks Bryan! If you haven't already done so, check out this interview I did with Don back in 2013.
  9. Episode #5 is now live. Cheers! Dave https://www.buzzsprout.com/335183/1398409-episode-5-terence-this-is-stupid-stuff-by-ae-housman
  10. Thanks Josh! Glad you enjoyed it.
  11. All: We were going through some old footage from AF 2012 and found a raw, unedited interview with Don. There are some parts that should be edited (some zooms, pans, some times where I'm asking him questions with no microphone) but it's still amazing. Don is a great speaker, and so eloquent on the philosophy of the craft. Here it is, no edits, just the raw footage but I think it's still pretty amazing. Enjoy! Dave https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6X22DSdnzE
  12. I do have a long list, but I'd be happy to take suggestions, Joel. I do have to be cognizant of copyright, however, so old stuff is fine (anything older that 1919 is generally non-copyright). I can do selections of copyrighted works under fair use doctrine, but would need permission to recite the whole work. Episode 3 will be released in a couple of days. I'm reading a short story by John Steinbeck in this one. Thanks! Dave
  13. Very cool! What's the steel mix? Any wisdom to impart on thickness/sharpness of the cutter used to "smear" the feather? Have you noticed that different cutter shapes produce different feather angles/lengths? Dave
  14. Hello All: For me, the link between Literature and bladesmithing is not something I can sever. Many of you might not know that I was once an English professor teaching Literature to college students. It's been nearly 20 years since I left the University to become a capitalist heretic, but I miss teaching. So, I've started a podcast about poetry and literature. I thought I'd share it with my brothers in this craft, because I know enough about the type of people who are drawn to this work to know that you're all warrior poets at heart. The first two episodes are up. My goal is to
  15. I love it! Thanks for sharing it, Jim! The collars in front of the bolster are a nice touch. The feather is just awesome. The wood grain of the end of a log on the top of the bolster is a great touch, too. Tell Don he's missed! Dave
  16. If you clean the bolster carefully with acetone or another solvent, then apply clear packing tape on it, it resists the FC well. The other thing to do is just suspend the knife in jar of FC with the blade point down and the handle out of the solution.
  17. Great minds, Clifford. I did that. Went out and robbed the little 20# tank from the BBQ and hooked it up. The forge worked normally. Guess that eliminates the regulator. After venting the 100# bottle for about 2 hours (opening it for about 10 seconds every 15 minutes or so) I still have it at over 180lbs. I think the lesson here is don't tell the guy filling your propane tank that you're a bladesmith. He asked "is this for a forklift?" . . . next time I'll just say: "Yup." Dave
  18. More data that seems to confirm the over-filled theory. Looks like a full 100# tank is supposed to weigh 170 lbs. Just brought a scale out to the tank. 191 lbs! I'm slowly venting it by opening the valve and letting it off in the atmosphere every 10 minutes or so. Sorry, environment, but I don't want to explode.
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