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Gary Mulkey

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Everything posted by Gary Mulkey

  1. Gary Mulkey

    Working on a Potpourri of Styles

    Here are four quite different blades that I forged & H/T'ed this weekend. https://flic.kr/p/2fiUovF The largest will be a kukri with a sub hilt. The top one will be a small vest pocket Bowie and the remaining two typical hunters. I got the blade sanded & the handle fittings roughed out for the vest pocket Bowie today. The blade is some 1080 San Mai'ed with 15N20. The fittings are 416 and the handle is some nice crotch walnut. The guard will be a traditional oval. I'm not sure yet if I will inlay escutcheons into the walnut burl or not. I'll try to keep you updated on these four as I go.
  2. Gary Mulkey

    Available Knives for Sale

    I've recently opened an Etsy account (MulkeyKnives) where you can view all of my available knives at Etsy.com.
  3. Gary Mulkey

    Available Knives for Sale

    Facebook but not Instagram.
  4. Gary Mulkey

    Seeking advice

    I have used both the Watco & Minwax brands.
  5. Gary Mulkey

    Seeking advice

    Rather than using an oil finish try going to a hard finish like a wipe-on polyurethane. It will fill the open pores.
  6. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    It's always a challenge to come up with a new design for a project. For my next I'm going to borrow from my late friend, Alex Daniels. I'm sure that I will add some of my own touches to Alex's design such as a mosaic damascus blade and possibly a pommel wrap. This is going to be my basic inspiration:
  7. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    That is to say, I probably won't etch the blade to show the hamon. I've never had a piece of "W" series H/T without a hamon of sorts. It just won't happen. I've tried and can't do it.
  8. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    I'm not sure but I think that I'll do this one without hamon just to look more traditional.
  9. Gary Mulkey

    Available Knives for Sale

    Thanks, gentlemen. So far I've not seen any sales but it doesn't hurt anything to have another avenue for them. Today's market is quickly becoming an online one.
  10. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    For whatever reason, this mosaic seemed to fight me from the start. I ended up making and welding it in three different canoes before I finally got what I thought were good welds on all of the tiles. Once I ground off the scale there were no visible weld lines so I thought that I was finally home free. However, while smithing a blade from the billet two of the welds decided to release. At this point there was no fixing it as the flaws were such as there wasn't enough good steel for the blade so I was forced to go another direction. So now this project is going to have a mono-steel blade of W1. This will match Alex's original better so I'm not totally bummed but it's always a drag to waste three days of forge work.
  11. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    Lots of tiny jelly rolls. Since the jelly rolls are made from a "W" pattern there isn't the normal spiral that you would expect with a jelly roll as the layers are going the opposite direction. It should make for a very interesting pattern.
  12. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    Thanks, Joel. I think that in order to get this pattern to fit the blade shape that once cut that I'll probably etch the tiles of this pattern before I place them in a canoe so that I can arrange the pattern to match the blade. We'll see. That's still a good way off.
  13. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    We had perfect weather here today and I got in a good day's work of the forge making steel. I decided to go with the idea of doing a jelly roll of a "W" pattern just to see how it turns out. The initial stacks: The "W" welded: Drawn out in preparation for the jelly roll: Quartered to be easier to handle while doing the jelly roll. I also beveled one edge for the inside of the jelly roll just to make it easier. I managed to get two of the four pieces forged into a jelly roll & welded before finishing for the day. As you can see I then forged them square in preparation for a 4-way weld:
  14. Gary Mulkey

    Fit for a Riverboat Gambler?

    Here's my finished Arkansas Toothpick/Dagger: Custom Damascus, stabilized mastodon ivory bark, 416 stainless w/blade steel inlays:
  15. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    Alex passed away last June. I agree he was the best. [For me it was Jim Batson who taught me to solder.]
  16. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    I would love to make a feather one day. It will require that I make some special dies for my Uncle Al press before I can though. As is, my press doesn't open wide enough for feather dies. Ron Newton showed me one time how to overcome this. I just haven't taken the time to build the custom dies for it. I'm thinking about maybe taking Andrew's idea of a jelly roll and going one step further and doing a jelly roll out of a multi bar "W" pattern billet and then stacking it 4 x 4 with every other piece rotated. I need to ruminate on it for a while though.
  17. Gary Mulkey

    Designing My Next

    Jelly rolls are almost a pattern of the past. Salem Straub is the only one that I can think of who has done one in quite a while. It's probably been 8-10 years since I've made a jelly roll. That's a thought though.
  18. Gary Mulkey

    Fit for a Riverboat Gambler?

    Hidden pins through the spacers on each end.
  19. Gary Mulkey

    Fit for a Riverboat Gambler?

    Thanks, Alan. I look forward to seeing what you do with your Samuel Bell.
  20. Gary Mulkey

    Beer = better forging?

  21. Gary Mulkey

    Culver Inspired (Copied) Slipjoint

    Looks like you're getting there. Nice job. Something that I found handy back in the day when I was making folders was to make a jig with all the holes drilled into it so I could pin all the components to it to check the action of the blade & spring. It will also be handy for laying out the holes should you make others the same size.
  22. Gary Mulkey

    A Mosaic Damascus WIP

    As "Old Man Winter" is hanging on, I have gotten into the habit of running the forge for at least a couple of hours the first thing in the morning just to warm the shop even though I have plenty to work on without do more forging. Recently I got permission from my friend Jean-louis Regel to reproduce in my opinion one of his most beautiful Damascus patterns and thought that some of you might be interested in how I go about it. I didn't want to ask him to go through all of the steps that he used to get the pattern as it is fairly complicated one but as best that I can figure out from a photo of one his knives, this is how it should be made: A= 1/8" 1080(1084) B= 1/16" 15N20 Welded pieces referred to as "Billet" 1)The initial stack: AA-B-A-B-A-B-A-B-A-B-A-B-A-B-A-B-AA 2) Once welded cut into two pieces 1 1/2" wide x ? & stack: AA-Billet-AA-Billet-AA 3) Do a "W" squeeze and forge to 1 1/2" wide Then cut into five equal length pieces & stack: Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet 4) Weld and then square on the bias Orient so that the internal lines direct toward the center, 4-way & weld 5) Tile cut & weld I'm fairly certain that I won't recreate the pattern perfectly as every piece of my Damascus is always unique and has some degree of distortion but hopefully it will turn out something like this: Here's my initial stack: Once welded I cut it in two and added more 1080 to the stack: To this I flipped it 90 degrees and did a "W" squeeze drawing it out to 1/2" x 1 1/2" x whatever. This I cut into five equal lengths and stacked: Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet-A-BB-A-Billet This stack was too thick to go through the door of my forge so I welded it in three parts and then combined them: The next step was to square this billet on the bias: This is where I stopped for the day. I'll try to keep you updated with more as I progress with this one.
  23. Gary Mulkey

    A Mosaic Damascus WIP

    A "W" squeeze is done at 90 degrees to the layers of the two steels causing them to bend. A feathered "W" has one more step after this.
  24. Gary Mulkey

    Which hammer for me?

    The brand of hammer matters not but you will find that 2lbs is the most common size and once you learn how to use it, the cross peen is very useful.
  25. Gary Mulkey

    Help with Kris hilt design

    Geoff, Each island has(had) it's own handle design which would vary greatly. As best I know, the notches were unique to the Empu (priest) who made the knife. The Empu would fast for a week until he got a vision for your knife and the number of bends &notches that he put in the blade was to determine how it would effect your future (wealth, power, accomplishment of goals, etc.) The handle design was repeated knife after knife. Once you received your finished Kris you should put it under your pillow and sleep on it. If you had good dreams then the knife should be kept as it would bring you good fortune. Bad dreams and get rid of the knife for it would bring you misfortune. I've only made one Kris and would have to hunt to see if I still have any photos of it. (The one that I made was styled after those from the island of Java.) You'll find that one of the hardest parts of making a Kris is building a solid wood sheath that the knife will fit tightly into.
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