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nprovos

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Everything posted by nprovos

  1. A lot of us spent a lot of our time in front of the grinder. I ended up getting myself a powered positive pressure respirator to breath clear air. However, the metal dust from the grinder gets everywhere. There is no surface in my shop where I don't get dust. On the other hand, dust collection for metal is surprisingly difficult. Many here use a water-based spark trap which also gets really messy. I found myself with some spare time and the desire to play with sheet metal. So, I am starting to build my own metal dust collector that does not require any water. As usual, I put this exploration on video. So, far I have built a Thien Baffle. Let me know if you have any advice or feedback.
  2. nprovos

    Building a Metal Dust Collector

    I never tried to cut with a torch before. I should have read up on it - on the other hand, it was sort of amusing trying to chase the heat around the cut and seeing it clearly not working. The plasma cutter is a blast, I have been using it for lots of other purposes as well, e.g. repairing the side blast forge. Thank you.
  3. nprovos

    Building a Metal Dust Collector

    Here is an update. I get to try the sucker for the first time :-)
  4. At the shop, we have been using a side blast forge for general blacksmithing. It's a great tool as clinker can be removed quickly without great interruptions to the fire. The side blast forge relies on a water cooled tuyere. After more than ten years of great service, the air pipe finally rusted through. I have attached some photos of the surgery and reconstruction. Forge area with tank removed: Tank cut open with plasma cutter - at that point it was clear already that the tank needed to be rebuild as well: Removing the air pipe with a die grinder: Fitting the new pipe: Rebuilding the tank from 3/16" steel plate: Finally leak testing the rebuild tank: It still needs to be installed and tested but this is how far I got during my holiday break. Happy hammering. Niels.
  5. nprovos

    Rebuilding a Side Blast Forge

    Here is the latest progress: Installed pivot for the air lever. Plasma cutting and extremely poor sheet metal welding to repair the back. I replaced it with 16 gauge instead of 17 which might make it last a little longer: Finally installed the tank and the tuyere: Almost looks like new :-)
  6. It's been a while since I had anything to post but I have been catching up on my video. Here is the current progress on a broad seax: This has not been a straightforward as I would have liked - future episodes will show me reforging and tapering the nozzle of my forced air propane burner Let me know what you think. Ps: Some of you may also be interested in my Patreon experiment: https://www.patreon.com/nielsprovos
  7. nprovos

    Forging a "Viking" Broad Seax

    I am glad you like these videos - they certainly make me appear much more competent than I feel in the moment. Especially straightening after a heat treat is something that I find exceedingly stressful :-)
  8. nprovos

    Forging a "Viking" Broad Seax

    Some more updates on this. Please, let me know what you think.
  9. I have been toying with the idea of making a video that explains the pattern-welding process via computer visuals. Here is an early experiment from 2016: As part of that video, I would like to show a few high-quality pictures of pattern welded examples. If anyone here is interested in seeing their photo featured (with their name) in the video, please let me know. Ps: Progress on this will likely continue to be slow but I plan to complete the video this year.
  10. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    I first saw this at Schloss Gottorf many years ago and was inspired by it:
  11. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    I just posted another thing I am playing with on Twitter, I am not sure if the forum software will be able to understand it:
  12. nprovos

    Building a Metal Dust Collector

    I have filmed welding before. It's just takes a lot of effort to set it up. Check this out:
  13. nprovos

    Building a Metal Dust Collector

    Do you have a pointer to a welding lens? First time I have heard about it.
  14. nprovos

    What did you do in your shop today?

    I got to test run my metal dust collector today. The Thien Baffle I built seems to be working alright at least it seemed that the dust collected in the bottom of the machine rather than being blown out:
  15. nprovos

    Building a Metal Dust Collector

    Here is part two:
  16. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    Thanks for the pointer, Ric. I had not seen that yet. That's really good.
  17. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    This is blatant advertising of a commercial offering. So don't read further if that upsets you. I liked the pictures I had shared above and wanted to make a t-shirt and a higher quality printout of them for myself, e.g. something to quickly show folks to explain some aspects of pattern welding. While doing that I figured I might not be the only one who would think that neat and put them up on RedBubble for others to buy. Here are the final pictures I came up with: Ps: I do get a commission for orders placed. As I have worked on this for almost two years that does not seem unreasonable :-)
  18. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    I am getting to a place where I am happy with the visualization and can now focus more on animating the process. It's still going to be slow though.
  19. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    They are computer generated :-) I plan to make a fully animated video that shows stacking and twisting, etc. BTW, I am still looking for more people who would like to share photos of their pattern-welded blades to be included in said video :-)
  20. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    Sure. Here you go.
  21. nprovos

    Pattern Welding Explained

    Here is an update to show where I am currently at visualizing pattern development; some of you may recall this from a paper from Ypey: Let me know what you think about the current look. BTW, I am still looking for more examples of pattern welding in the real world. If you have any examples you would like to share, please let me know.
  22. nprovos

    Flame Edge Serpent Seaxes

    This came out great. Thanks for sharing! Looking forward to how they look when you are done with them.
  23. As I needed to rebuild my forge, I noticed that I could not find a lot of articles where the forge shell was cast from refractory concrete. Here is my experience with using Kast-O-Lite 30 LI. My need for a new forge arose when after some extended forge welding and bloom consolidation the roof of my forge caved in. For the new forge, I decided to go with a refractory concrete shell that can take all the abuse I might throw at it. Kast-O-Lite 30 LI seemed like it fit the bill with a maximum use temperature of 3000F which is not something I am likely to reach unless I am over boiling iron. (It was what I had at hand from another project, for general forging Kast-O-Lite 26 would be better suited). Here are some of the steps I went through: The construction used five pieces of concrete: Two sides, one roof, and two pegs. Where the pieces met, I had to split the angle, so used 22.5 degrees on each side of the different pieces. The end result was going to be a shell that would support itself. The first step was creating the forms from 2x4 and some wooden boards. The forge itself is about 13in long, and about 9in high. To get the angles, I used a bandsaw with a swiveling table that I could dial to 22.5 degrees. The measurements that determines the spacing of the pieces were all done on the outside and piece of 2x4 was attached to the board with wood screws. Here is how they looked like. I lined them with packing tape since I did not want to spend the time to sand and coat them. Although, the packing tape turned out to be not so much fun to work with, so next time using some polyurethane and vegetable oil might be better. I used almost the whole 55 pound bag to fill the forms. Kast-o-lite is mixed with 20% water by weight. Using a whole bag is recommended as the water can be measured more precisely then. I mixed this in a big 5 gallon bucket with a mixing attachment to my power drill. You are supposed to mix for 3 minutes and then cast within 10 minutes. Afterwards, the pieces need to dry for at least 24 hours and should be covered to slowly dry out the surface. Here is how that looked like. After drying out they had to remove from the forms which was not so easy. Essentially, I had to unscrew one of the wood pieces on each form to get enough leverage to lift the piece out. The curing schedule for Kast-o-lite is quite complicated and basically requires a programable oven. Since the pieces are all 2in thick, the curing schedule is as follows: Heat up to 250F with a rate of 100F per hour. Hold for one hour. Heat up to 500F with a rate of 100F per hour. Hold for one hour. Heat up to use temperature with a rate of 100F per hour. I heated it up to 1500F. The whole process took a little bit longer than 16 hours. Here are the cured pieces The cured pieces fit together fairly well: However, actually fitting them in the forge was more difficult. I had undersized all the pieces but did not account for the heat warping of the sheet metal that made up the outer shell of the forge. Even the undersized pieces where too thick to account for the bowing in of the sheet metal. This took some adjustment with a grinder till everything fit together. I closed up all the gaps with refractory mortar and am now looking forward to using this for more forge welding. I hope somebody is going to find this useful. Niels.
  24. nprovos

    Forge from Kast-O-Lite 30 LI

    This whole endeavor was not a successful experiment. Too much thermal mass. Takes too long to come up to heat and I struggled with forge welding.
  25. I have shared this on my Facebook profile and page as well. Good luck. Ps: I started with The Complete Bladesmith as well :-)
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