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Grant Dorangrichia

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Posts posted by Grant Dorangrichia

  1. Working it hot helps. However Stainless just doesn't like to do some things. Like stretch for instance. So that making an exterior roll is incredibly difficult. It's easier to compress and roll to the inside.

    I use it for small pieces like jewelry. But large pieces, no. It tears me up and tears up my stakes and hammers.

     

    Grant

  2. Saign is pretty much right on. All the armour I've been able to handle has been hardened. The only pieces that have been "heavy" have been pieces made for the joust. Even those were incredible in that the metal was pushed around so that areas of high stress and impact ( left front side) have much more metal than areas that were less likely to be hit ( back and sides, right front side).

     

    Anyway Mathew it's easy enough ( and cheap ) to just stick with mild steel. It moves like butter and if you went with anything needing hardening it may be overcomplicating what you're really looking for.

     

    Steer clear of stainless for your own good. It's a pain to work ( literally)

     

    Grant

  3. That's interesting info Patrick, Thanks! I actually got that phenomena with my first attempt at shibuichi. I melt both metals together in an electromelt then poured onto a flat sheet of steel. I wonder if this is almost a fine grain mokume rather than a true alloy?

     

    Grant

  4. Thanks guys :) I have a few more projects underway, one is a commission for a set of steampunk style gauntlets and another will be a full harness with chased and repousse lions covering it for myself. That one will be alot of fun :)

     

    Oh yeah, I have armour for my doberman started but thats on the back burner for now...

     

    Grant

  5. Thanks for the added suggestions. He ended up specifically wanting the Tolkien runes so that's what I'll use. As long as it says what he wants in SOME sort of runes I guess I can be happy with them :)

    Thanks for the book suggestions, I'll definitely check some out to add to my reference library.

     

    Thanks!

    Grant

  6. Those items certainly exist, however they're more the exception I think. Bear in mind armour was the defense for 800 or so years. So almost every weapon had to deal with it in some way. You can either use brute force to penetrate the plate or use finesse to slip into gaps. For swords thats generally how they dealt with it, by having the top 1/3 of the blade or so razor sharp, thin and flexible.

    Every culture was doing things different though. Same goes for time period as well. What I'm referring to is plate armour ( what I generally think about when talking about the Higgins :) )

     

    Grant

  7. Many of those blades were made so they would slip between gaps in armour. They are actually thin enough that they'll flex under their own weight.

     

    Also one thing to remember when looking at originals, chunks of metal that are hundreds of years old have obviously rusted and corroded and possibly been re-polished ( the victorians liked to do this) so that in some instances its impossible to know what the original thickness and weight should have been.

     

    The Higgins is definitely a favorite for me since you can get so close and not only can you take pics but you can use your flash!

     

    Grant

  8. I know that there are folks here that can help me out with this. A customer sent me this pic to make him a pendant and I just wanted to double check the runes for him. Just with a quick look online I can't seem to make sense of the runes he has on there.

    Thanks!

     

    Grant

    34185_138344199517701_100000263656309_301641_5840440_n.jpg

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