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VaughnT

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VaughnT last won the day on October 28 2018

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  1. Shoot, I know a guy in Goldvein that'd likely take all 7 of them.
  2. That's a pretty brilliant solution! I'm not sure I'd be allowed to use it since it seems too easy. Usually, I have to cuss, spit, throw the piece out the back door and start over from scratch.
  3. I keep saying I'm going to write an article on this, but I keep forgetting. Anyhow, having injured my elbows moving thousands of boxes of coins, paying attention to ergonomics has become something of a big deal for me. Studying how the body works and interfaces with my tools.... well, that happened real quick once my blown elbows let me know that they didn't much care for swinging the hammer. Some key things to think about: 1 - Never wear a glove on your hammer hand. I don't care how tight it is, the glove is still creating a sheer plane and forcing you to
  4. My camera died right before Christmas, so I had to borrow one to get a shot of the finished candle holder. Otherwise, not much going on. Work is work, and all the production forging doesn't leave me with much energy to do things for fun.
  5. One of my latest pieces - I do more blacksmithing than knife-making, so....
  6. Totally forgot about him. He does some great videos, too. Like the ones I mentioned, he stays tight to the work, minimizes nonsensical jive, and turns out a very nice finish on his pieces. Two thumbs up!
  7. Mark Aspery definitely sets the gold standard in terms of video quality. Craig Trnka is probably the single best resource for learning how to effectively move iron. I'm not a farrier and have no interest in making horse shoes, but this guy is simple amazing. How he can get that steel to move under his hammer is almost miraculous, and to have everything come out so wonderfully clean is something to be seen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6sRXurRsBs Another good one is Elchschmiede. He doesn't speak english, but I speak blacksmith and can follow along quite nicely.
  8. I'd love to get one of those old anvils just to say I have it in the shop and can keep her working. My Fisher is from 1896 and it's a hoot to sit there pondering what all it's seen. Can't imagine having an anvil from the Old World.
  9. No blades to work on at the moment, but I did manage to get a few dishes done for folks.....
  10. Those are/were produced in India or thereabouts. A fellow over on the IFI forums managed to get a few pictures when he was doing missionary work in the region, thinking it was a Nazi relic. Turns out that the same design is a sign of good luck, prosperity, etc, in that area and there's at least one company that used it on their anvils and such products. I don't recall if the company is still operating, but it was an interesting lesson in history.
  11. I really enjoy watching guys do things with their hands, even if it's something I'll never try to do myself. I can't count how many vids I've watched on hit-n-miss engine rebuilding and the like! I'll look forward to seeing your videos.
  12. A great loss. I've always used his work as the standard to match when trying to do traditional leather and beads. Really a great guy.
  13. Almost reminds me of an automated type of those cards a spinner uses to align the wool before spinning it into thread. I love guessing games like this; the hardest part is getting your mind out of the modern era.
  14. Kevin's a great guy and a fairly decent knife maker. But only an idiot would think you could use a rooster as a substitute for a swallow, compensating for the gross discrepancies with some fancy arithmetical equations!
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