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jo_smith

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Everything posted by jo_smith

  1. I thought the same thing about the pins and the edges. However the customer was sitting next to me and watching almost every step of the build. He was in love with the pins and I just made what he wanted. It was one of those jobs where you make what they want and just do your best to make it look the best with what you have to work with. Thanks for the comments.
  2. This is the first knife I have been asked to make specific for someone. The blade is raindrop made from 1095 and 15N20. The handle is buffalo horn with copper bolsters and mosaic pins. The filework turned out nice but I have to say it was a pain. His brand is etched in the blade. I hope everyone likes it but please let me know of issues or things that could have done better. Thanks, Jo
  3. Well guys I am finally going to break down and buy a gas forge. I have built a few good forges before but this one I want to work the first time I light it. Plus I am a drilling engineer and most of the time I live on the drilling rig I am working with. So I am needing a forge that is not too big and is portable. Not planning on making swords or anything that big. I am mainly needing it for heat treating and maybe a bit of light smithing work. Have been searching for the last few months and I keep coming up with the same results. That being, there are so many different makers and different pri
  4. I have an age old question I am sure. What are the cutting edge that you enjoy using most. The reason I ask is because I have a long history with using a knife as a tool to make a living. My father is a taxidermist and has been all of my life. So growing up using and sharpening a blade has been something that has been like second nature to me. However now that I find myself making knifes and reading so many different ideas and choices it has made me change my idea of what a true cutting edge is. Now I know that there is an edge for every chore. I understand this totally. But what I am wanting
  5. Here is my first try with damascus. It is 1095 and 15n20. Looks even better up close. The handle will be silver bolster with a Kauri and ebony for the body. Sorry the pics are crap. My Iphone flash was weak.
  6. I found a great website and supplier for black oxide. http://www.baileypottery.com/clay/clays-chemicals.htm Prices seem reasonable at $2.95 to $2.30 a pound depending on how much you order. I have another quick question. What is the differnce in the Fe2O3 and the FeO formulas of iron oxide? There are quite a few different formulas that I think would be interesting to just play with in a smelt. There is a titanium and iron ore. Now I know that titanium does not forge or work well but what are y'alls thoughts on giving a go at smelting this and seeing what might happen?
  7. After doing a lot of searching, Oklahoma is very low on iron ore, if there is any at all. I have seen a few adds for Magnetite Black Sand on ebay but at $5 a pound, it could get very expensive to have a good sized smelt. I am willing to do the work to find it but there seems to be no luck unless I find it from a commerical source. Does anyone have any connections where I can buy it. I was looking thru gold prospectors sites but they think there is still a lot of gold left in their sand and will not sell, or if they will sell they want a HUGE premium for it.
  8. I am wanting to give it a go. I understand how to setup the furnace but what I am having trouble with is finding the raw ore to put in it. I live in Oklahoma and black sand is very hard to find if there is any. Any ideas or suppliers would be a huge help. I have search and watched a ton of videos but no one really talks about where they get their iron ore or what they used in their smelts. Thank you for all the helps guys. JO
  9. I recently bought the book, "The Art of Japanese Sword Polishing." I have to say I am very impressed with how they are able to make a blade shine and how they bring out the detail in the steel. I have had a very hard time finding water polishing stones. I know that using a good set of buffing wheels and good compounds, a shine like these can be achieved. I would like to try it by hand and see how different it is. Using machines makes things move a lot quicker, but it is nice to master the way it has been done for many years. I have found a few sources for stones but they are all man made.
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