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Pieter-Paul Derks

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Everything posted by Pieter-Paul Derks

  1. I always appreciate seeing your progress Joshua, I like the shape of these palm daggers, sadly they are very illegal where I live so making one would be a bit of a waste. What kind of surface grinder do you use? I'm weighing my options for one in the future.
  2. Is there any benefit to making a titanium hammer? except for the coolness factor of course. I used to forge titanium bottle openers and it was a real effort to stay within the working range, too cold be even a slight bit and it would just stop moving under the hammer.
  3. I like it, a good kitchen knife with consideration for the user, exactly where custom knifemaking shines. It makes me wonder how many knives I've made, I never kept track. I know it is a lot less than a hundred, but I might be the slowest knifemaker in the world, with only 6 or 7 pieces each year.
  4. Very nice, that woodwok looks like it is very satisfying to do with the japanese planes.
  5. These are cool, Triangular ''blades'' fascinate me
  6. Sculpting the human form in metal is a very hard task. It looks like you have the skills and patience to pull it of.
  7. This one ticks all the boxes! the carving and engraving is just top notch.
  8. When I did some of these broken back sheaths, I found that carving a groove inside the leather at the spine of the knife helps with shaping it. I use a gouge from the ''break'' to the tip to make the leather a little thinner in that localized spot. I have no idea if this was done historically. With a wet formed sheath I coat the knife in vaseline and shrink wrap, a little bit of extra protection against rust.
  9. Now that is some next level pattern welding, I really like the special punch and the effect it gives. These late roman blades are some of the coolest historical works, the patterns are so creative and diverse
  10. That floating meteorite piece is just too cool! good luck with the rest of this build
  11. That is a nice one, that homemade steel is really pretty and I think it fits great with the stag.
  12. Man that is nice. I love this time period, You don't see enough people reproducing these germanic artifacts.
  13. I've been here since 2012, this was the first place I learned that there were actually people still forging blades in the 21th century. I learned so much here, and it still is my favorite place on the internet, even though I don't post that often. Lets hope it will be here for many years
  14. That turned out great and very clean! the handle is super pretty as well. I've gotten a few requests for forged axes, but it is too hard work for my wrists and elbows to take it.
  15. Oh no maybe I'm not the best at explaining The pin head is the same diameter as the pin hole, it is not peened or enlarged. Essentially just a rod pushed through the handle with nicely finished ends.
  16. I hope to not highjack your thread, but I do these domed pins a bit differently, what I think is an easy ''cheat'' method. Obviously this doesn't work in situations where the pin needs to put clamping force, like in razor scales for instance. I use pin stock of the diameter I want the final head , carefully measure the thickness of the handle plus one time the diameter of the pin stock. I just chuck it in a drill and dome and polish both ends. When I epoxy everthing together I coat the domed pin ends and the handle in grease so the epoxy doesn't stick. The hardest part is getting the pin centered with epoxy everywhere. Not the best picture, but this is a bronze pin with this method, I chamfered the hole for a bit of a heirloom fit as well.
  17. In my blown burner the gas is pumped straight into a 1/4 inch tube connected at a right angle to the air line, no mig tis or anything. I have a needle valve in the line but I don't use it, between the regulator on the tank and a gate valve on the air I get all the control that I need. My forge is not a ribbon burner, just a straight pipe, dirt simple and works great.
  18. Some good tips here, I cheat and just epoxy my domed pins without peening but this method is a lot more legit.
  19. So good!, I'm really envious of your ability to stick with a project after so many hours. I get really fed up with a project once I get around 40 hours in and find it hard to finish after.
  20. Now that turned out great, it really looks like a museum piece. I had always believed that seax sheaths covered most of the handle, but I might be wrong on that for this type of knife.
  21. Super clean work, I love this type of sword with the wide crossguard
  22. Exquisite as always! a real accomplisment to both of you for capturing such a fragile subject in such a hard medium as steel.
  23. Now that is very nice, the combination between the white handl and the patina is very nice. That slanted bolster is killer too.
  24. This is so cool, I need to get my hands on some horn soon. I even like the filework, and I'm normally not a fan of that.
  25. I have a huge block of it, it is nice stuff but a bit whiter and less figured than I expected. I have never worked with real ivory so I have no idea how much it resembles the real stuff. It sands and polishes very fast and is sensitive to dirt getting into the surface, so working with clean hands is a must. It also smell lovely like coconuts.
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