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joe pierre

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  1. joe pierre

    Game of Death Tanto

    just auto paint. not my strength -- very hard to keep the black lines straight!
  2. joe pierre

    Game of Death Tanto

    i should have mentioned that I didn't do the polish. well, i did, but it looked like crap, so i sent it to be fixed by Josiah Boomershine who did the final clean up and kissaki polish. props to Josiah!
  3. joe pierre

    Game of Death Tanto

    Mini osoraku tanto in W2 steel. A project conceived of several years ago, in tribute to my childhood hero Bruce Lee, and finally completed. IMG_1836 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1680 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1835 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1832 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1673 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1677 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1682 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1825 by drjoe4, on Flickr IMG_1668 by drjoe4, on Flickr Screen Shot 2019-02-18 at 7.05.05 AM by drjoe4, on Flickr
  4. joe pierre

    antler handle

    aside from sanding down all the sharp bits, how are folks finishing the outer surface? do you use something to sand the "grit" out of the low spots? do you use a wax, oil, or lacquer coating on the outside?
  5. joe pierre

    help with brazing

    yeah, lack of proper equipment problem i think. what's the minimum kind of torch one would need for a brazing job like this? $80 MAPP torch from home depot?
  6. joe pierre

    help with brazing

    i noticed today that it was a zinc plated bolt. probably didn't make a difference because i ground the bolt down and had heated on several occasions, but still... actually, the more i think about it, i think the problem is that i was heating the joint area with direct flame instead of allowing the metal to melt the flux. then, once the flux melted, it took on that gummy/dirty look. probably should be heating underneath and letting the metal melt the flux and then the solder. but that was never happening with the propane torch.
  7. joe pierre

    help with brazing

    thanks guys. well, the flux definitely boils off (perhaps more from the flame than the steel itself), it's just that it kind of leaves a residue and the solder isn't drawn to it. but the solder isn't instantly melting on contact the way it should, so i still think the problem is not enough heat, heat that is too uneven between the tang and the bolt, or maybe there's a problem with scale that forms in the flame of the burner which i'm using as a torch. i could put the burner into the forge and then the tang into it, but this is on an already forged piece, so I'm trying to keep heat off the blade and don't want it sitting that far in. this is frustrating because i've attempted this several times now with the same result. i'm not confident that i can repeat the process and change conditions enough to get it right. and we know what they say about repeating the same thing expecting a different result. it's also frustrating because my original plan was to use the more mechanical method, connecting the two pieces of metal with the mortise/tenon/cross pin method, that i wish i'd stuck to now. i could at this point cut off the end of the tang (and my losses) and do that with a longer bolt. the joint is also partially connected now by friction and what may be some very small successful solder points. in fact, if i try to break the joint by hand with light pressure, it doesn't budge. so i could just fill the rest with JC weld or epoxy. it would probably hold just fine, though it would probably annoy me to leave it that way.
  8. joe pierre

    help with brazing

    i'm going to attempt to answer some of my own questions. propane torch does not give enough heat to braze a steel tang. also, i keep melting my brazing solder in the torch flame instead of letting it melt by touching the metal. but when i tried to just remove the flame and touch the solder to the metal, it doesn't flow. not hot enough i suspect, or problems with scale as i mentioned. the bolt was probably galvanized, but whatever coating was there should have burned off the the first couple attempts. suggestions?
  9. joe pierre

    help with brazing

    this is a brazing 101 question... i've done it successfully (if not great) with 45% silver solder (sheets from an unknown maker that i got on ebay) on a copper habaki, but this was my first time trying to braze a threaded bolt onto a W2 tang to attach to a pommel. i'm using harris stay silv for flux -- it's a little dry and chunky, so I reconstituted it with a little water. several attempts today failed. cleaned up the joints, fluxed the contact points, fit the bolt into the tang nice and tight, but once i heated it, the flux melted and got kind of gummy and the solder just did not want to stick and flow. i decided that my small home depot propane torch was not getting the steel hot enough (orange, but not bright) and since i don't have anything else, i switched to my forge burner. but although it got nice and hot, same result. solder just sat there and didn't move, whether i was touching it to the joint (cut strips held by pliers) or when i laid little pieces at the joint. not sure what i'm missing. started with clean, ground contact points. used flux sparingly. i can only figure heat was a problem and when i used the forge burner it generated some scale that prevented the solder from doing it's thing?
  10. joe pierre

    Antler handle hidden tang -- how?

    hmmm... maybe JB Weld?
  11. joe pierre

    Antler handle hidden tang -- how?

    I'm planning a slightly curved piece of antler and was thinking about putting the tang into it likewise curved. thought it might help with retention. this is why I was thinking about burning it in.
  12. joe pierre

    Antler handle hidden tang -- how?

    yeah, I considered the forge and thread method, but am not confident about my ability to forge and grind to a perfect, or close to perfect, size and round. I started using the plumbers epoxy method a while back, but I didn't like the long-term durability of that product. but I agree that a fully hidden tang with a high-quality epoxy and "barbs" cut into the tang will probably be stronger than the antler itself. that's certainly the easiest approach, so maybe I'll give that a try.
  13. Working on a bowie knife with a hidden tang and a classic antler handle. I haven't done this before, so I'm looking for a few tips: 1. Can I burn the tang into the antler like I do with wood, or is the preferred method to soak in hot water or boil until the tang can be jammed into the pith? 2. What is the typically way to fix the tang into the handle? It's a large bowie, so I don't think epoxy alone will cut it. I'm guessing I could peen the end of the tang by having the tang come to a point and them hammering it against a butt cap. I don't think I'm set up to attempt to thread the tang so that it could screw into a nut/pommel, but I could try. If anyone knows of a tutorial, please let me know.
  14. joe pierre

    Tengu Forge Zombie Cleaver aka "Apocalyptica"

    i think the handle was burled maple, from Aldo. the wood didn't really "pop" until i gave it some lacquer, which seemed necessary to protect the handle steel from rusting.
  15. joe pierre

    Tengu Forge Zombie Cleaver aka "Apocalyptica"

    figure in the wood? it's just the burl?
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