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Jason Brown

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Jason Brown last won the day on November 20 2015

Jason Brown had the most liked content!

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    http://www.youtube.com/hardwaylearnt

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington
  • Interests
    Bladesmithing, leathercraft, chemistry, outdoors, hunting

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  1. Forged from the swords of your fallen enemies that their souls may not rise again to challenge you...
  2. a leather burnisher comes to mind. that one with the chuck mounted could be used to chuck a hardwood burnisher for the edges of leather sheaths.
  3. the PW really goes great with the Sheep horn. well done.
  4. One thing that would be worth doing would be finding or constructing a water basin that the bottom of the stone dips into. This way you will have a constant lubrication of the stone and work piece.
  5. Alan, you spin a yarn better than you spun the tops of those pins. Wes, I recently invested in a vacuum chamber, pump, and some cactus juice to work on this very problem. For my own hidden tang knives I've used a long soak in BLO as well as Danish oil to get as good of a seal as I can on them plus I have used leather spacers to allow for some shrink/expansion at the ends but I have not used pins yet. My feeling is unless the wood is properly stabilized it will gain and lose moisture and cause such issues. Turntex the seller of cactus juice stabilizing resin recommends baking the wood for 2 hours at 200 degrees F prior to stabilization and immediately placing it in a bag upon removal from the heat to prevent re-absorption of humidity from the air. My feeling is cooking it won't be of any use unless it is immediately sealed/stabilized. Now if I could just find something less costly than cactus juice. $90 a gallon puts a hurt on my ability to fund my projects.
  6. Not sure who to point this out to but I was just looking at the hall of fame nominations thread and each of the links I clicked led to a domain registry site rather than to the correct page of dfoggknives.com. Just thought I would run it up the flagpole in case any of you guys know who to pass this info to.
  7. Thanks Joshua. That is beautiful work in your photo too! I think I'm going to fix up some pressure plates for my next attempt.
  8. Hey Yall. I tried making Mokume Gane for the first time today and failed. I was using stacked quarters tied with copper wire. I had them on a piece of flat steel in the forge (charcoal) and heated until I thought I saw the copper sweat (orange heat.) Then I smacked them lightly at first then I whacked them pretty good 6 or 7 times. While they were hot they seemed to be well stuck together. When they cooled they are no longer stuck together. Did I just not get it hot enough? Did I smack it too much or not enough? I tried this with a stack of 10, 6 and 4. Same results all: burnt looking flat quarters.
  9. Batoning is usually really hard on finishes (and edges) so if you apply a coating or bluing, whatever you use should be really durable if that is the intended purpose. Also think about a convex edge if you are building a batoning knife. It works better than most other edges for that task. I like the blue or forced patina and wax idea from Kevin.
  10. The military has adopted all kinds of silly rules for knives that change with the location of the deployment so it is hard to say. Your friend should be able to get info on the rules from his command. As for essentials: a tough steel with great edge retention good corosion resistance, and a fantastic heat treat to give it the best durability in hard use. It will also need a handle that can be gripped wet or dry and used with gloves. A kydex sheath in the camo pattern he will wear while deployed would be a great bonus. just my .02
  11. Has anyone ever thought of using an SiO2 thermite reaction on a bed of copper in the crucible to reduce the SiO2 and kick off the Si melt? I've been pondering this for some time for making Si-Bronze. Not sure what the Aluminium slag will do to it. I assume fluxing and removing the slag will work after the melt. My understanding is the thermite reaction doesn't generate enough heat to sustain the melt of the copper but I figure I can add heat from the forge. I'm going to do a tin bronze melt and I figured doing this in a crucible on the forge (outside) might be possible and a fun experiment. Thoughts? It would solve the Ferro silicon sourceing problem since SiO2 is easy enough to come by.
  12. Does this only work in internet explorer? I tried with Chrome and I get tot he preview and all I get is a white screen in the post. Also the enable HTML selection is on the right of the screen when I see it not under a button. again I wondered if this was only in chrome.
  13. Geoff, We have never met but we have conversed on the forum. Sounds like we need to set up a Western WA meet and greet.
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