Jump to content

DaveJ

Members
  • Content Count

    269
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    9

Everything posted by DaveJ

  1. Lacquering the Handle & Scabbard The first layers of natural urushi lacquer are applied to seal the surface of the wood and the cord wrapping. Additional layers will strengthen and provide the ishimeji (stone surface) texture when mixed with crushed and dried tea leaves. More on these techniques: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGVCgaF7IYA The finished Tools for Satoyama Mountain Tanto disassembled into its component parts. Specifications The blade is just under 7.5" long and the overall length is about 12". The spine at the munemachi is about
  2. Carving the Handle & Scabbard (more: islandblacksmith.ca/2016/02/making-a-tanto-takedown-handle) The tools used for creating this style of handle are quite simple, the work can be done with only a handsaw, a saya-nomi chisel, and a kiridashi knife. A wood block kanna plane is also helpful for leveling the inside and shaping the outside. The core of a handle and scabbard are traditionally carved from hou-no-ki (Japanese Bigleaf Magnolia) due to its non-acidic, moisture-stable, and shock absorbing nature. The example below was carved from local Nootka Cypress which shares similar g
  3. Forging & Fitting the Guard The guard is forged from one quarter of a silver-plated copper bus bar washer. The round hole is forged down into the narrow hole for the tang. The opening (nakago ana) is adjusted by filing until it slips into place on the shoulders of the blade (machi).
  4. Forging & Hardening Blade A worn out and rusted file serves as the starting material for the blade. A charcoal forge provides the heat to hand forge the file into the shape of a tanto blade. After forging is complete, the profile is cleaned up with a file. The surface of the blade will retain its hammer texture and the pattern from the original file teeth. A sen dai style staple vise holds the blade while filing the bevels closer to finished dimensions. A mixture of natural clay, charcoal, and polishing stone powder forms an insulation la
  5. this is the tanto-sized version of the mountain kotanto pattern... Satoyama are the managed forest areas that border the cultivated fields and the mountain wilds in Japan. Historically they provided fertilizer, firewood, edible plants, mushrooms, fish, and game, and supported local industries such as farming, construction, and charcoal making. Balancing the interaction of wetlands, streams, forests, and fields is an important component of the satoyama landscape and allows for sustainable use of the rich resources they offer. About the Tools for Satoyama Project (more: island
  6. Final Assembly watch the longer real-time video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyFtrcWlYzk Carving and fitting the mekugi (bamboo peg) that will hold the entire assembly together. When all of the components are complete, the blade is given its final honing and the knife is ready for assembly. Specifications The blade is just under 5.75″ long and the overall length is about 10.25″. The spine at the munemachi is about 5mm thick. Nagasa (blade length): 144mm Motokasane (blade thickness): 5mm Motohaba (blade width): 30mm Sori (cu
  7. Urushi: Wrapping and Lacquering watch the longer real-time video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGVCgaF7IYA The first layer of natural urushi lacquer is wiped off leaving a thin sealing layer in the pores of the wood. When fully cured, the handle is wrapped tightly in natural cotton cord to provide strength and grip texture. The scabbard is also strengthened at key points with tightly wrapped cord. The cord is saturated with natural urushi lacquer and allowed to cure for several days. Several additional coats of urushi are used to create the fin
  8. Saya: Making the Scabbard watch the longer real-time video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvLFrP6DNhE As with the handle, the scabbard is carved to fit the blade with saya-nomi (scabbard chisels) and then joined before shaping with kiridashi (carving knife), and kanna (hand plane). A kurikata (cord loop) is carved from Maple and wedged into a keyway.
  9. Tsuka: Carving the Handle watch the longer real-time video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPPFoQ1I_oQ The inside of the handle is carved to fit the tang snugly, then the halves are joined together with rice paste glue. When dry the shape of the guard is used to create a shape and the handle is carved to match.
  10. Tsuba: Making the Guard One-fourth of a silver-plated copper bus bar bracket is forged to shape. The round hole in the center is reshaped and drifted to create the nakago-ana shaped opening for the tang. Hand filing adjusts the fit snugly to the shoulders of the blade. The rim of the guard is filed to an oval profile and given a hammered finish.
  11. Yaki-ire: Hardening the Blade After hardening the blade with a traditional clay and water method. The thicker clay layer on the body of the blade insulates the steel, causing it to cool slower and form pearlite/ferrite. The thin slip layer on the edge increases the surface area, causing it to cool very quickly, forming martensite. The bevel is ground down until almost sharp, and the blade surface is cleaned with hot vinegar water to remove remaining forge scale. This particular harrow tooth seems to have been made of an old piece of shear steel, a rare form of p
  12. Hizukuri: Forging the Blade watch the longer real-time video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tFPLH05Aqc The raw material for this blade comes from a reclaimed harrow tooth salvaged from a farm in northern Alberta. Shown after the forging stage, all shaping done by hand hammering. After hand filing to define the machi (tang notches) and clean up the profile.
  13. working away at things...but time to emerge from the shop for a few minutes and post... Satoyama are the managed forest areas that border the cultivated fields and the mountain wilds in Japan. Historically they provided fertilizer, firewood, edible plants, mushrooms, fish, and game, and supported local industries such as farming, construction, and charcoal making. Balancing the interaction of wetlands, streams, forests, and fields is an important component of the satoyama landscape and allows for sustainable use of the rich resources they offer. About the Tools for Satoyama
  14. that is a lovely looking iron sand collection!
  15. your post on the consolidation of ore reminded me of pierre's articles on sumihira~san's zuku-oshi tatara steel making process... soulsmithing.com/index.php/2009/10/the-sumihira-zuku-oshi-tatara/ soulsmithing.com/index.php/2009/10/home-made-steel-a-week-at-manabe-sumihiras-zuku-oshi-tatara/
  16. that works, definitely yoroidoshi!
  17. @deker, i think stuart branson has come from that angle somewhat with his arashi no umi piece: bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=30883 ...and the patience isn't natural, it comes from sticking with the hard stuff until it finally works...life is busy but gotta do the best we can with what we have...i threw out the tv and got an anvil ^___^ @jan, thank you for the encouragement, it is something planned for the future, hopefully sooner rather than later! ...and that looks like an interesting book! the next islandblacksmith quarterly newsletter is coming out in a day or so...for those wh
  18. Here's some footage from several recent projects documenting the steps and sounds involved at many stages of the hundred-plus hour process, some extended and some previously unreleased clips, some from Japan and some from Canada, photos of the finished works appear at the end of the video. larger size here: islandblacksmith.ca/2015/12/sounds-of-the-workshop-tanto-overview/ also on youtube: youtube.com/watch?v=pFmuIAZjhb0
  19. yes! ...and so glad to hear about the new home for the tsuba!
  20. thank you, @Kelso~san...yes, it was an interesting and challenging thought experiment to explore this alternative meeting of times and places...
  21. wow. the wing print is the perfect ura motif...like a visual tanka! (...and i think we work at about the same pace) ^__^ hokusai had a fun quote about his progress over time...at about 1:38...https://youtu.be/FmFGtsG_EgA?t=1m38s
  22. much appreciated, @Alan, incrementally learning...and mostly enjoying the struggle ^___^
  23. a recent shear steel fusion tanto during the final polish... forum WIP here: bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=32711 more info: islandblacksmith.ca/2015/12/touzai-fusion-tanto/
×
×
  • Create New...