Jump to content

Dan Waddell

Members
  • Content Count

    274
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Dan Waddell

  1. I didn't do so well at HT today. I tried about 10 times with water, oil, and water for 2 secs-oil. The best I ended up with was half as hard as I would have liked with just water quench. In the last quench I brought the blade much hotter then I thought it should be(bright orangeish) just to see if it'd crack in the quench. It didn't crack, but did develop a nice warp. In hindsight I probably should have normalised between these attemps, but in the end I angrily broke the blade in half to look inside. Time to start over.
  2. A little update. I got the blade roughed out, and test etched at 220 grit. There are many empty spaces that are hiding some pattern. I'm hoping at higher grit with a longer etch they will become more visible. That or I end up with a mutant of a sanmai. Here are some pics of where I'm at. 12.5" OAL 7.75" blade 1.5"wide a little under .25"thick at the ricasso. I didn't do a very good job working each side the same amount so my pattern ended up not being to symetrical.
  3. A little update. I got the blade roughed out, and test etched at 220 grit. There are many empty spaces that are hiding some pattern. I'm hoping at higher grit with a longer etch they will become more visible. That or I end up with a mutant of a sanmai. Here are some pics of where I'm at. 12.5" OAL 7.75" blade 1.5"wide a little under .25"thick at the ricasso. I didn't do a very good job working each side the same amount so my pattern ended up not being to symetrical.
  4. One thing I know for sure is in this line of work I can count on never running out of questions. Thank you both for pointing me in the right direction. Hopefully this spring I can find out if I actually understand this topic. I'd like to try and copy lee Saunders aristotle furnace before I try a full smelt again. (The first attempt failed before ore even got in the furnace) Doug what you said is making me think all the billets i've done by hand now have 1 more reason to be inferior to those done with a press. 10+hours at welding heat must lower the carbon content a bit.
  5. Ah thank you for clarifying Alan. I came across some information about adding carbon to steel without melting it, and that made me think removing carbon might be a possibility aswell. Any video/arcticle I've come across had a charcoal forge as the fuel source so I just didn't/don't understand every reason for that choice of fuel.
  6. I've done a little research on smelting/resmelting, and I don't understand the refining process to much. My main concern is would using a propane forge for the post smelting/resmelting, related to a finished blade, cause carbon loss to the point where I wouldn't have a great edge? So the main point I'm looking for is should I use a charcoal forge to keep my carbon or would a propane forge work just fine? I apologize for the ingnorance.
  7. I can't really weigh in on your billet, but I can tell you a bit about my experience. The last knife I finished started at 10 layers @1.4lbs and ended roughly around 160layers@ .7lbs after 15 or so hours of forging. This was the most efficient pattern welding I've done yet. I have also started to notice that trying to weld something thicker then .75" is a little to much for me with just a hand hammer. Maybe if we get stronger we can do larger billets well?
  8. Well the winds were awesome today so I got to do some forging! The first set of 3 billets was drawn out to 7" in preparation for final weld. The second set of 3 billets were drawn out, consolidated into 1, cut in 3, rewelded, and drawn to 7". At this point I realized my steel was undersized(15hours of forging) so I decided to go with a san mai and added 2 pieces of a file(both were 3.5x1.25x.125). I was hoping to have all the forge work done today, but both my propane tanks were frozen and my left hand was a little to tired to properly keep holding the tongs(I started hitting the bill
  9. Aldo has some 15n20 in stock of .130 thickness.
  10. Thank you today put me in a good enough mood to not dread this upcoming week of work:D the single bar is only 3.5x.875x.75 (ignorance+angle grinder=not being mindful of the flex and getting overly crowned edges). The 3 new ones are of the same starting lengths as the first 3 except I oriented the teeth on the same side. That turned out to be a good choice as the billets, to my memory, are a bit larger after clean up.
  11. I have been told that getting a hamon to show on a twist pattern is difficult. You still got yourself a good looking knife though. Nice work.
  12. So I have some progress to report. A nice day forging produced 3 more billets of the same dimensions as the first 3. I also drew out and consolidated the first 3 into one billet. For the first 3 I drew each to about 9" long then cut them into a total of 9 pieces for restacking. On the second batch I'm thinking of just getting the pieces uniform after some post weld grinding, reweld all 3 together, cut into 3 pieces, and weld again. I'm curious to see if there will be a difference in material loss doing it this way. Before starting this I would have guessed you could make a sword from 19.
  13. Well now don't I feel stupid....shoulda caught that one
  14. Now I'm just curious. Traditionally what kept moisture off the tang with this style handle? Was a tight fit enough or was there a reliable substitute for modern day epoxy?
  15. Thanks for breaking it down for me. This weekend depending on the winds I'll be doing either hot or cold work. Hopefully some on this and kith. You did get me obsessing more on my kith.....thinking about going to 9 billets and keeping thing odd on the way to 1 billet. We shall see.
  16. Thanks everyone I'm having alot of fun with this one! It seemed pretty logical to make a knife from a knife to me. Joshua- each billet is roughly 5"x5/8"x3/8". My forging plan as of right now is to draw each billet out long enough to cut in 3 pieces and restack into 2 billets. Then cut those 2 into 2 pieces, swap halfs, reweld, draw out to 8-10 inches, and cut each in half again. then finally combine all 4 pieces into a single billet, cut in half and reweld, and draw to shape. Especially since I don't have a press or power hammer I'm now thinking I may need to make 3more billets to be
  17. Let me start by saying maybe it's just new jersey, but everyone I talked to was under the impression that forging steel means you melt and pour it><. I blame TV. While walking through home depot it occurred to me that since I don't know a whole lot about what steel is used for what purpose I should let those who have done the work already do it for me. So I decided to make 1 blade from several others. I had found about 60feet of bandsaw blades in a dumpster so I don't know what they are, but they passed a hardening test. Then I found a razor blade that actually listed what steel i
  18. http://www.ronstanpaper.com/ Is the company my day job uses for all our boxes. You might have some luck finding the dimensions you want.
  19. Hmm interesting. I will save that idea for another day then.
  20. Does the frame need to completely outline the handle? I have an idea for forging the guard and frame from 1 piece, and in this idea the spine comes into the handle a bit. I think to make a guard and complete frame from one piece is beyond the tools and skill I have.
  21. Sounds good. This weekend I should have some time to work on this. Maybe even HT if I'm quick enough!
  22. time frame? I actually started 3 hunters recently to try and work on a repeatable process. why not try to add in some spacers and a frame:)
  23. Did anything ever move forward with this?
  24. Wow these are truly amazing works of art. I wonder what the material loss is on pieces like these.
  25. 1.Gabriel R. Paavola 2. Timothy Artymko 3. Gary Toulomelis 4. Caleb Harris 5. Scott Cruse 6. Tim Tracey 7: JJ Simon 8. Daniel J. Luevano 9. Dan Bourlotos 10. Pieter-Paul Derks 11. Joshua States 12. Kevin Hopkins 13. Robert Dowse 14. Brian Dougherty 15. Jeroen Zuiderwijk 16. Michael Cochran 17. Austin Lyles 18. James Fuller 19. Michael Seronde 20. George Ezell 21. Josh Fikentscher 22. Alan Longmire 23. Gabriel James Mabry 24. James Spurgeon 25. Don Abbott 26. Dan Waddell
×
×
  • Create New...