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Dan Rice

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Eastern Connecticut
  • Interests
    blade forging

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  1. The first couple of times, it was just a strong tingle when I flipped the power switch, but then I got a zap from the case that was like touching an electric fence. But I really hate getting zapped (from electric fence experience) so it's possible that I'm just sensitive to it and it was just static. I tested the positive and negative against the case and ground wire and got nothing, so most likely it's not shorting out. I'll replace the cord and see what happens. They're cheaper than I thought they would be, so I should have just ordered one in the first place.
  2. My multimeter came in the mail yesterday. I tried to test it for continuity, but the results were inconclusive. I couldn't get continuity on any part of the ground wire. Tried testing the plug to the cut end nearest to it, stripped to bare, clean wire. Cleaned the plug down to bright metal also. Then tested the other cut end to every part of the grinder that zapped me (the case and metal switch), and got nothing. If I didn't know better, I would draw the conclusion that the ground wire doesn't conduct electricity at all. A possibility more in the realm of reality, but still bizarre, is
  3. Yeah, I feel pretty dumb saying "Hey, it still works" and forgetting about it for years. I'm probably lucky it didn't start a fire. You are correct about the cut in the cord. I opened up the cover on the switch to see if anything was shorting out in there, but it all looked fine. Nothing loose or corroded. I'll put a multimeter on the shopping list.
  4. I have a Kalamazoo 2x48 grinder that I bought probably close to 15 years ago. I've never had a problem with it in all that time, but lately I get a slight electrical shock when I touch any of the metal parts. It has some damage to the power cord, sustained when I was dragging it out of storage in a tool shed several years ago, and the cord must have caught on something sharp. On closer inspection today, the ground wire was cut almost completely through. It actually broke the rest of the way when I was stripping some of the outer insulation off to look at it. There's
  5. Pardon the thread necromancy, but where can I find more information on this rustic style of tanto? I've been wanting to make a more or less authentic tanto for a long time, but I've been intimidated by the habaki and wrapped handles. I was thrilled to find that there is an authentic no-frills version. Is there anywhere online that I can find some pictures of historical examples that I could get some ideas from? I tried googling it but all I found was your knives, lol.
  6. Been working on a pair of Kephart knives. Finished sanding the blades this afternoon and then had a few choice words with myself when I found out that my planned method of making the handles wouldn't work. Kepharts are full tang knives, but for reasons I decided to make a "hidden full tang" like you see on popular knives like the Mora Garberg, by making the tangs a little narrower than the blade and inletting them into the handle slabs. I had gotten some flat end router bits nearly a year ago to use on my drill press to mill out the channels in the slabs, but when I tried it out, the router
  7. Pine is the best charcoal for making black powder, possibly because of the above-mentioned fast burning speed. I messed with charcoal a bit when I first started forging, and melted some steel with hardwood charcoal, so hardwood burns plenty hot enough. I don't know where you'd get pine charcoal, but I've been meaning to try making some pine tar one of these days, which would yield pine charcoal as a by-product.
  8. I got some 36 grit bits from Tru Grit a while ago, I think they were called "value ceramic." They are so much better than the cheap belts from Amazon that I've been using that I could have kicked myself for not investing in better belts sooner. I run a 2x48 so my options are more limited than 2x72.
  9. I mostly just sell what I make, but lately a lot of people have been asking me to make things for them, so for the past few months I've been doing only commissions. I like the artistic freedom of just making what I want and selling it, but the commissions I take are generally pretty open-ended. Someone will ask for a particular style of knife, and maybe give me a few criteria or dimensions that they want and I make the item to my own style. If someone asks for something that is really not my style, I tell them that someone else could do a much better job for them, which has only happened on
  10. I've done a couple of plywood handles. On the first one I used Danish oil. I kept applying it for ages because the plywood is so absorbent. It took a long time to dry and was kind of smelly. It still never built up enough on the surface to take a shine. On the second knife, I used some Helmsman spar urethane, which worked great. I plan to try it on a stacked leather handle next. I like Danish oil for solid wood, but I think less dense materials need a less penetrating finish. Super glue sounds like a good idea too, but I've never tried it.
  11. What I do with knives is wrap them up into a bundle with several layers of newspaper in such a way that the paper gets kind of wadded up on each end. Then I roll more newspaper into balls and pack them tightly into the box around the knife until it won't move when you shake it. If the knife has no sheath, I make one out of cardboard and make a pad of newspaper that's about half an inch thick folded over the tip and taped in place. So far I've never had a customer report any damage or problems with the packaging.
  12. 1. Timothy Artymko 2. Chad Scott 3. Caleb Harris 4. Wesley Alberson 5. Kevin Hopkins 6. Alan Longmire 7. Brian Dougherty 8. Pieter-Paul Derks 9. Joshua States 10. Dan Rice
  13. You mean mine? I'm not really sure if it's a hamon, or if I just didn't steel wool the edge as much. If it is a hamon, it's my first.
  14. Whew, finally got this thing done! I thought I was going to have to withdraw, but I finished the knife yesterday and the sheath today. I decided to go with a weathered old frontier look for this piece. The blade is forged from a file. The guard and butt cap are welding steel from Tractor Supply. The pins are nails. The handle is a piece of an old hickory axe handle. The rivets in the sheath are copper saddle rivets, also from Tractor Supply. Everything but the leather, fake sinew, and antler button came from a hardware store. I was worried that the rustic, antique effect might en
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