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Wesley Alberson

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Wesley Alberson last won the day on November 28 2017

Wesley Alberson had the most liked content!

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About Wesley Alberson

  • Birthday 01/15/1997

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Rougemont, NC
  • Interests
    Ancient Materials Science

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  1. Biggest carcass splitter so far

    I love the shape of that handle! Was it hard to soak all of that handle cord with resin?
  2. Ideas / Thoughts / WIP

    I would say go for it. What matters is that it is your take on a crusader's dagger.
  3. full tang handles

    It sounds like you are talking about a stick tang knife. I use a broach and drill to make the holes for my handles. Burning is a very primitive way of setting a stick tang, and it requires a large block of handle material in order to handle the heat of the burning. Broaches are easy to make; they can have as few at one tooth, and you can make them varying thicknesses to accommodate different tang sizes. I always carefully plan out the drilling of the initial hole into the handle material. I trace the outline of the tang on the side of the handle block, and center everything. Here is a video of the way I do it, although this is a take-apart design. Rather than messing with epoxy putty, you could use regular epoxy to permanently fix the blade.
  4. If you are unfamiliar with the wedge tenon design, here is a record of its development: A multi-purpose drop point knife with a leather sheath and a unique wedged tenon joint on the end of the handle that allows the knife to be taken apart.The blade is made of 1084 steel, with a diamond cross section. The handle is made of walnut and padauk, with a forged stainless steel guard and butt plate. The forge finish has been kept on the spine of the blade, as well as the bolster and butt plate. The wedge is made of 5160 steel that has been spring tempered for maximum toughness. It comes with a decorated leather sheath that can be worn on either side, making it ambidextrous. The wedged tenon design is a combination of the traditional Japanese take-apart design which uses a bamboo peg to retain the blade in the handle, and an architectural tenon joint. The butt plate has an angled groove that the wedge fits in. The wedge is tapped in with a hammer, which presses the butt plate against the handle (or pulls the blade against the guard, depending on relativity). The friction and pressure holds the handle and fittings completely solid, and keeps the wedge from backing out unless direct force is applied with a hammer and punch. It is useful to be able to take apart a knife for cleaning, repairs, and even major refinishing of the knife. The excellent condition of Japanese blades that are hundreds of years old is due in part to the ability to take the blades apart. Specifications:7.5" edge12 3/4" overall length~1/4" thick blade (distal taper) I am asking $400 plus shipping. $10 for domestic shipping and $20 for international shipping. A multi-purpose trailing point knife with a leather sheath and a unique wedged tenon joint on the end of the handle that allows the knife to be taken apart.The blade is made of 1084 steel, with a diamond cross section. The handle is made of walnut and zircote, with a forged stainless steel guard and butt plate. The forge finish has been kept on the spine of the blade, as well as the bolster and butt plate. The wedge is made of 5160 steel that has been spring tempered for maximum toughness. It comes with a decorated leather sheath that can be worn on either side, making it ambidextrous. The wedged tenon design is a combination of the traditional Japanese take-apart design which uses a bamboo peg to retain the blade in the handle, and an architectural tenon joint. The butt plate has an angled groove that the wedge fits in. The wedge is tapped in with a hammer, which presses the butt plate against the handle (or pulls the blade against the guard, depending on relativity). The friction and pressure holds the handle and fittings completely solid, and keeps the wedge from backing out unless direct force is applied with a hammer and punch. It is useful to be able to take apart a knife for cleaning, repairs, and even major refinishing of the knife. The excellent condition of Japanese blades that are hundreds of years old is due in part to the ability to take the blades apart. Specifications:7" edge12" overall~1/4" thick blade (distal taper) I am asking $400 plus shipping. $10 for domestic shipping and $20 for international shipping.
  5. Some concept drawings

    The last one reminds me of the Dwemer art style from The Elder Scrolls V. Really cool sculptural concepts!
  6. Does Magical Realism Count?

    I think that there is always magic in legends. The knives are described much larger than usual, which makes me think of games like Dark Souls and cartoons where the weapons are sometimes bigger than the characters in order to add emphasis. It also adds a magical element to it where the pro/antagonist wields a large blade as if it was made from aluminum.
  7. More videos

    I'll mig weld it up for sure, I just wanted some practice with forge welding. In hindsight, I could have punched a hole through each die and riveted it on some other stock. That way I would be hitting the die, rather than the thinner stock, which is the reason it broke in the first place.
  8. More videos

  9. More kith questions

    I would say make it as artsy as you want, as long as it is pointy/sharp and heat treated, and sturdy enough to use.
  10. Three Bones

    I was thinking of making a knife that was in-game, but decided against it for that reason. Many people have re-created the blades, I want something original. It might be interesting to give it some battle scars to make it really look like an ancient artifact.
  11. Three Bones

    I have been playing too much Skyrim for the last few weeks, so naturally the idea for my blade has been heavily influenced by it. I want to incorporate my wedge tenon design on the knife, so I got to thinking. It would be cool to do some sort of design with dragon bones, and using a bone-shaped thing for the wedge would be pretty cool. While I'm at it, the dragon bones might as well make up the guard and butt plate, maybe even the handle, I'm not sure. The "bones" would be made of steel most likely. I'm leaning towards the less harshly curved version. With the bones being somewhat round, the wedge might be an issue to work into the design. Although there are these "dragon claws" in the game that are used as keys to different dungeons, and every dungeon requires a claw made of a different material (emerald, gold, sapphire, etc.). Fortunately there is an iron dragon claw, so maybe a smith broke the claw apart and turned it into a knife. In Skyrim, the dragons have their own language with a cool-looking writing system that is made by their claws scratching stone. It could be cool to incorporate the symbols into it. I found out that "three bones" translates to "sed qeth," and looks something like this: This is what the iron claw looks like, the three symbols need to be matched up on the door in order for the key to work.
  12. KITH 2018 poll

    When I made the / I meant that either a knife or any edged tool will do. It has to be able to cut or pierce, so anything from hawks to daggers to sharpened dividers will do.
  13. Jamb Knife, Take-Down Concept

    A couple new ones, and new things that I have tried, too. The drop point has my touchmark on the tang inside the handle, and the trailing point is visible on the side. The drop point has a padauk and walnut handle, and the trailing point has a zircote-padauk-zircote handle. It is my first time working stainless steel, I was able to hot punch a hole through the stainless stock and drift it up onto the shoulders of the blade. The resistance of the stainless steel actually made the hole more crisp than with mild. I kept the forge finish on the front of the bolster and finish it everywhere else. I tried out my leather stamps on these for the first time. I wasn't able to get the tapered shape as defined as I would have liked on the trailing point sheath, so a swivel knife is on its way from Amazon. Update: The handle on the drop point didn't fit quite right on the guard/handle surface, so I had to sand away some of the handle to get the fit right again. Unfortunately, the wedge didn't fit firmly anymore from removing material on the handle. There wasn't enough of a gap to fix it by adding a metal spacer, so instead I was able to deform the tang hole at the end of the tang. I took off the handle, put the blade in a vise so the end of the tang was sticking out past the jaws, and gave it a couple whacks with a hammer. It fits completely snug again.
  14. KITH 2018 poll

    I think that people should start on the project on Jan 1 (or now for that matter), and then once a couple people finish we can start a signup thread where people can post a picture of their completed tool which will enter them in for the drawing.
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