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Wesley Alberson

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Everything posted by Wesley Alberson

  1. That is some solid advice. When I started out, my main inspiration came from Dave Friesen's work and the videos that he made of forging a tanto. I must have watched the video about 10 times before I made my first knife. I tried to emulate some of his work, and it helped me figure out what I like. A lot of my knives today have no plunge line and a take-apart system because that is what I learned from studying his knives. From studying the puukko knives that Aiden CC and Lauri make, I like to add a forged bevel to the spine of my blades. Everyone on this forum has inspired me to adopt design elements of their knives, and sometimes it is unconscious.
  2. I was thinking about the benefits of different grinders like the common 2x72 platen/wheel setup and the large stone grinding wheels that are common in Japanese/European cutlery factories and shops. It seems to me that the stone wheel setups are more stable and ergonomic, and many of the stone wheel setups have the user sitting down with the wheel rotating away from them. Why don't we do this with belt grinders? I know that in order to use some types of jigs, you need a 90 degree surface for the jig to slide on, but jigs can be made for the other style, too. The grinder that I had in mind would use a 3" or 2" by 132" belt with the largest wheel size possible (and platen, too). Essentially a regular grinder that has been rotated 90 degrees so the arm is vertical. It could be mounted in some sort of box so that it could be water cooled, and a seat mounted in front. The bench design is great because it doesn't take up much shop space, but if shop space is not an issue, and for many people the grinder is the most important piece of equipment, I wonder if it is a good idea to make a grinder this way?
  3. I like those kitchen knife handles!
  4. Sure, here are a couple of pictures. The butt plate fit isn't as precise as the guard fit because there needs to be some wiggle room, but I could probably get it closer. You'll notice that the inside edges of the guard kind of dip downwards from the peening. I need to use a smaller hammer towards the end in order to get in there. my fitting process goes as follows: punch the hole and drift with a tapered drift until it fits most of the way on the tang, making sure that the smaller opening is the face of the guard I used a squashed piece of pipe that goes over the tang to hammer the guard up to the shoulders of the blade , but not onto the shoulders yet. At the anvil I slide the guard up to the shoulders of the blade while holding the blade in my left hand. I then hammer the sides of the guard until there is no gap on the sides, alternating every couple of hammer blows. I try not to hammer the back of the guard closed, so I hold the blade at an angle and hammer at an angle so I'm mostly moving the face of the guard. Then I will hammer the guard onto the shoulders of the blade, making sure not to overheat the shoulders and deform them. There will always be a gap, there is no avoiding it. The gap will get slightly larger when I grind post HT, and then I hammer the hole closer with a ball peen hammer, adjusting the hole with a file and changing the taper of the tang if need be.
  5. Thanks! The wood is padauk, it is nice stuff, but it can be prone to splitting if the tang fit is too tight. The fit up can be tricky at times. I need to make the handle, drill and file the tang hole, then grind, fit, and heat treat the pin. All of the stainless fittings have been hot punched and drifted onto the tang.
  6. Shoulder fits work well, but without the right jigs it is hard to get all 4 shoulders lined up. The press fitting can make a good-looking joint. the main thing is, is having a tapered tang. Not only that, the thickest point of the knife should actually be a little bit forward from the shoulders, just barely. This is so you know for sure that the guard will always be pushing up on a thicker and thicker portion of the tang. This is also so you don't lose your mind, trying to make the shoulders the absolute thickest point, like a balancing act. For hidden tangs that I do, I usually just use my belt grinder and create the shoulders. I don't get a perfect 90 degree angle, and that isn't what I want anyways because sharp corners can be stress points, although that depends on how strong/thick the tang is. I hot punch and fit my fittings on most of my knives so the shoulders are deep inside the bolster/guard, I really like the look. Because the hot fitting process doesn't yield a perfect fit (and I need to grind the blade more anyways, which will further change the fit), I use a ball peen to close the gaps the rest of the way. The front of the guard is forge finished, so the peen texture blends in, and the face of the guard is past the shoulders so the peening doesn't bring the face of the guard behind the shoulders of the blade.
  7. Ah, ok. I thought all this time that you need 3 phase input for a VFD, and the VFD simply changed the frequency. What is the most common VFD that people buy for this setup? After a quick search I found this: https://www.wolfautomation.com/index.php/catalog/product/view/id/8663/s/ac-drive-3hp-12a/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIupfhm6LK2QIVjVcNCh0KsAZdEAYYASABEgJ6Q_D_BwE I made my grinder with a variable pulley system, and I'm not really happy with it, everything is too fast. That being said, I am currently powering my shop with a drop cord and I can only run 120V power to my shop. As long as I use fresh belts, wood doesn't burn and steel doesn't overheat too fast.
  8. If someone only has access to single phase power, it it feasible to use a stepper motor with a high rpm and a pulse controller to control the speed of the grinder?
  9. This is an excellent build! Thank you for posting this.
  10. I love the shape of that handle! Was it hard to soak all of that handle cord with resin?
  11. I would say go for it. What matters is that it is your take on a crusader's dagger.
  12. It sounds like you are talking about a stick tang knife. I use a broach and drill to make the holes for my handles. Burning is a very primitive way of setting a stick tang, and it requires a large block of handle material in order to handle the heat of the burning. Broaches are easy to make; they can have as few at one tooth, and you can make them varying thicknesses to accommodate different tang sizes. I always carefully plan out the drilling of the initial hole into the handle material. I trace the outline of the tang on the side of the handle block, and center everything. Here is a video of the way I do it, although this is a take-apart design. Rather than messing with epoxy putty, you could use regular epoxy to permanently fix the blade.
  13. If you are unfamiliar with the wedge tenon design, here is a record of its development: A multi-purpose drop point knife with a leather sheath and a unique wedged tenon joint on the end of the handle that allows the knife to be taken apart.The blade is made of 1084 steel, with a diamond cross section. The handle is made of walnut and padauk, with a forged stainless steel guard and butt plate. The forge finish has been kept on the spine of the blade, as well as the bolster and butt plate. The wedge is made of 5160 steel that has been spring tempered for maximum toughness. It comes with a decorated leather sheath that can be worn on either side, making it ambidextrous. The wedged tenon design is a combination of the traditional Japanese take-apart design which uses a bamboo peg to retain the blade in the handle, and an architectural tenon joint. The butt plate has an angled groove that the wedge fits in. The wedge is tapped in with a hammer, which presses the butt plate against the handle (or pulls the blade against the guard, depending on relativity). The friction and pressure holds the handle and fittings completely solid, and keeps the wedge from backing out unless direct force is applied with a hammer and punch. It is useful to be able to take apart a knife for cleaning, repairs, and even major refinishing of the knife. The excellent condition of Japanese blades that are hundreds of years old is due in part to the ability to take the blades apart. Specifications:7.5" edge12 3/4" overall length~1/4" thick blade (distal taper) I am asking $400 plus shipping. $10 for domestic shipping and $20 for international shipping. A multi-purpose trailing point knife with a leather sheath and a unique wedged tenon joint on the end of the handle that allows the knife to be taken apart.The blade is made of 1084 steel, with a diamond cross section. The handle is made of walnut and zircote, with a forged stainless steel guard and butt plate. The forge finish has been kept on the spine of the blade, as well as the bolster and butt plate. The wedge is made of 5160 steel that has been spring tempered for maximum toughness. It comes with a decorated leather sheath that can be worn on either side, making it ambidextrous. The wedged tenon design is a combination of the traditional Japanese take-apart design which uses a bamboo peg to retain the blade in the handle, and an architectural tenon joint. The butt plate has an angled groove that the wedge fits in. The wedge is tapped in with a hammer, which presses the butt plate against the handle (or pulls the blade against the guard, depending on relativity). The friction and pressure holds the handle and fittings completely solid, and keeps the wedge from backing out unless direct force is applied with a hammer and punch. It is useful to be able to take apart a knife for cleaning, repairs, and even major refinishing of the knife. The excellent condition of Japanese blades that are hundreds of years old is due in part to the ability to take the blades apart. Specifications:7" edge12" overall~1/4" thick blade (distal taper) I am asking $400 plus shipping. $10 for domestic shipping and $20 for international shipping.
  14. The last one reminds me of the Dwemer art style from The Elder Scrolls V. Really cool sculptural concepts!
  15. I think that there is always magic in legends. The knives are described much larger than usual, which makes me think of games like Dark Souls and cartoons where the weapons are sometimes bigger than the characters in order to add emphasis. It also adds a magical element to it where the pro/antagonist wields a large blade as if it was made from aluminum.
  16. I'll mig weld it up for sure, I just wanted some practice with forge welding. In hindsight, I could have punched a hole through each die and riveted it on some other stock. That way I would be hitting the die, rather than the thinner stock, which is the reason it broke in the first place.
  17. I would say make it as artsy as you want, as long as it is pointy/sharp and heat treated, and sturdy enough to use.
  18. I was thinking of making a knife that was in-game, but decided against it for that reason. Many people have re-created the blades, I want something original. It might be interesting to give it some battle scars to make it really look like an ancient artifact.
  19. I have been playing too much Skyrim for the last few weeks, so naturally the idea for my blade has been heavily influenced by it. I want to incorporate my wedge tenon design on the knife, so I got to thinking. It would be cool to do some sort of design with dragon bones, and using a bone-shaped thing for the wedge would be pretty cool. While I'm at it, the dragon bones might as well make up the guard and butt plate, maybe even the handle, I'm not sure. The "bones" would be made of steel most likely. I'm leaning towards the less harshly curved version. With the bones being somewhat round, the wedge might be an issue to work into the design. Although there are these "dragon claws" in the game that are used as keys to different dungeons, and every dungeon requires a claw made of a different material (emerald, gold, sapphire, etc.). Fortunately there is an iron dragon claw, so maybe a smith broke the claw apart and turned it into a knife. In Skyrim, the dragons have their own language with a cool-looking writing system that is made by their claws scratching stone. It could be cool to incorporate the symbols into it. I found out that "three bones" translates to "sed qeth," and looks something like this: This is what the iron claw looks like, the three symbols need to be matched up on the door in order for the key to work.
  20. When I made the / I meant that either a knife or any edged tool will do. It has to be able to cut or pierce, so anything from hawks to daggers to sharpened dividers will do.
  21. A couple new ones, and new things that I have tried, too. The drop point has my touchmark on the tang inside the handle, and the trailing point is visible on the side. The drop point has a padauk and walnut handle, and the trailing point has a zircote-padauk-zircote handle. It is my first time working stainless steel, I was able to hot punch a hole through the stainless stock and drift it up onto the shoulders of the blade. The resistance of the stainless steel actually made the hole more crisp than with mild. I kept the forge finish on the front of the bolster and finish it everywhere else. I tried out my leather stamps on these for the first time. I wasn't able to get the tapered shape as defined as I would have liked on the trailing point sheath, so a swivel knife is on its way from Amazon. Update: The handle on the drop point didn't fit quite right on the guard/handle surface, so I had to sand away some of the handle to get the fit right again. Unfortunately, the wedge didn't fit firmly anymore from removing material on the handle. There wasn't enough of a gap to fix it by adding a metal spacer, so instead I was able to deform the tang hole at the end of the tang. I took off the handle, put the blade in a vise so the end of the tang was sticking out past the jaws, and gave it a couple whacks with a hammer. It fits completely snug again.
  22. I think that people should start on the project on Jan 1 (or now for that matter), and then once a couple people finish we can start a signup thread where people can post a picture of their completed tool which will enter them in for the drawing.
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