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LeeMalco

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  1. Anybody got any advice on making a liner locking folder? I'm pretty sure my major issue is going to come with tempering the liner and bending it so that it will engage the heel of the blade when the blade is in the locked position. Anyone attempted one of these before?
  2. Just forged and am in the process of filing a little EDC/ utility blade with a kind of wedge-shaped handle. It's pretty thick at the spine and looks somewhat Strider-esque in profile and is quite stabby at the tip. My question is this: how do I go about putting paracord on the handle? Is there a particular pattern I should weave it in or just drill a hole on each end in addition to my lanyard hole and do it with knots? I don't care about it being removable, in fact would rather it be permanent on this one as I've seen the removable ones go to pieces before. Planning on setting it with so
  3. Doug, for what it's worth (haven't been doing this long), I still peen pins, which I make from nails. I learned how to do this from a guy with a lot more experience than me. I will say that I like peening pins on micarta much more because I can smack the snot out of the pins and not worry about cracking scales. As far as how I do the pins, I put the nails in a vise, cut the heads off with a hack saw and file the cut smooth, because then they peen more evenly and don't have a bunch of little nobblers on them when you're done. I use a light tack hammer and strike at a slight angle, trying to
  4. Thanks guys! You made my day, lol. Any day I don't have to call Midway and wait a week is a good day
  5. So I'm trying to chemically blacken/rust blue some mild steel quillons and a pommel for a dagger. Everything I've found has said to use Renaissance Wax to shine this stuff after boiling. I looked at the price of the stuff and balked a little. So I'm wondering if carnauba wax of some kind (McGuires? Turtle Wax?) would work as an alternative. If not I guess I'll just have to spring for the pricey stuff.
  6. Nice plunge cut on the one side, how does the other side look? I can never get those to turn out right so it's good to see that it's possible
  7. Thanks for all the advice. I hadn't really thought about the stress riser problem. This is why I come here!
  8. So I got a new form forged, and I had a bit of a fever dream. Serrations. I really don't like them on production knives that much because you need an MS in engineering to sharpen the things, but some people like them and I figure I should know how to do them if I'm going to sell blades eventually. Has anyone ever done serrations or have a source of information on how to do them? If so, how do you go about it?
  9. Thanks, I appreciate the input. Guess I'm sticking with the oil stone for now
  10. Looking to get a nice set of stones but the choices are overwhelming. There are oil stones, water stones, diamond stones and a bunch of different grits. My question is this: what would any of you get on a limited budget? I have a Norton two sided oil stone from Home Depot right now and I'm looking to upgrade.
  11. That's a lot of 1095! You're a braver man than I using a steel that hard for a sword, unless it's a katana and you're welding some wrought around it. I'd probably be using 5160 for a sword because of the flexibility, but have at it man, let us all know how it turns out!
  12. That's a lot of 1095! You're a braver man than I using a steel that hard for a sword, unless it's a katana and you're welding some wrought around it. I'd probably be using 5160 for a sword because of the flexibility, but have at it man, let us all know how it turns out
  13. Chris, Geoff is right, I got a bunch of Ford pickup truck leaf springs and forged knives from them. By far the longest and most arduous part of the process and the part for which you'll likely need a partner, some hefty tongs and a sledge hammer is breaking down the material to a useable thickness. I can only imagine how much work semi truck leaf springs would be. You're going to want to work this type of steel (presumably 5160) kind of hot. It doesn't want to move under the hammer quite as easily as say 1095 or W-1, the simple steels, do. Also, watch out for cracks. Leaf springs come to
  14. Thanks for the advice, and I think I'm definitely going to oversize the hole because I'm doing epoxy. Yeah, I'm not confident enough in my abilities to get things to fit tight and flush to do without epoxy. It's going to have a pin AND epoxy. Even cut notches in the tang to get it to grab better. I probably need to make myself a broaching tool too
  15. Oh, derp, sorry about the ignorant post, my computer did something weird and I couldn't see the last of the text :/
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