Jump to content

Matthew Rhame

Members
  • Content Count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Doggerland
  • Interests
    Early medieval European armor and weapons.

Recent Profile Visitors

323 profile views
  1. Admittedly the title is kind of "click baity", but the real end goal in this for me is overcoming the challenge of using a bad source material and turning it into something great whether that be a knife, dagger, sword, or billet. It's sort of an adventure for me, so even if I fail, it will still be worth while (I'm no stranger to failure, I assure you. haha). Although hypothetically and unrealistically if I did turn out to be some bladesmithing prodigy, I wonder if there would be master bladesmiths that would "scout" me (sorry just fantasizing out loud xD). Anyway, I digress... I wonder about
  2. Sorry, if this is a silly question, but how exactly did you forge the small lip around the center piece?
  3. So as of late while gallivanting around the site, I stumbled upon the concept of "Aristotle's Furnace", so I got to thinking; I'm an amateur with some free time coming up due to fall break, I have an excess of clay that I processed, and I have a passion to make some good steel. So the thought occurred to me that rebar could perhaps be a cheap alternative that is readily available and can be cut into bits and melted down in the furnace. I am even thinking of making my own charcoal for this project. Does anyone have any other suggestions for cheap, readily available iron or steel sources? Also y
  4. Any opinions on Forged swords vs Stock removal swords? I'm currently thinking about making a single edged viking sword or langsax/langseax out of 1075 bar stock. The durability and "battle readiness" of the sword should still be fine, right?
  5. Thanks for the kindness and words of wisdom, Doug Lester. As I said on another thread, I probably should have put more emphasis on the "seax" part rather than the "sword" part, haha. Perhaps in my over eagerness I may have been a bit fool hardy, but I do mean what I say. I may not begin by forging a sword, but I'll get there one day, but for now I guess I'll stick with practicing by making railroad spike knives and buying materials online to make damascus (1095 and 15N20)... hopefully the attempt will go well, but if not then I'll just keep trying and when I finally do have a sufficient billet
  6. Thank you both, Mseronde and Austin Lyles for your inputs. In hindsight I suppose that when I typed "sword or seax" I should have put more emphasis on "seax" and a lot less on the "sword" part, haha. The thing is that materials like railroad spikes, saw blades, and lawn mower blades are fairly abundant for me and my friend, so we were planning on trying to do something with some of them. Perhaps, it would be better to practice by making the railroad spikes into knives rather than trying to go through the process of hammering, folding, fluxing, removing scale, etc, but at the very least I would
  7. Not too bad at all. I'm assuming the pointed tip at the end of the handle is for hammer fisting someone with side or downward strikes, right? Regardless, I might suggest adding some curvature to the lower edge of the handle for a better grip, especially since it's only going to be wrapped with paracord, but other than that nice work, congrats man.
  8. Anyone have any grinding jigs that they'd care to show off? I'm looking to put a Scandi grind on a blade and I'm curious as to how different people go about it.
  9. Hello everyone, I've looked into blacksmithing and bladesmithing a lot over the years and I haven't ever heard of someone using rail road spikes and saw blades to make damascus. I assume it's possible, but I am concerned with the possibility of the carbon content being too low. So I've thought about adding 1095 steel to the "stack" if necessary in order to make a sufficient billet for a sword or seax. Would anyone mind weighing in with their expertise and/or knowledge? P.S: This will be my first time ever actually blacksmithing... yes, I know a beginner making damascus is craz
  10. Hello everyone, I've looked into blacksmithing and bladesmithing a lot over the years and I haven't ever heard of someone using rail road spikes and saw blades to make damascus. I assume it's possible, but I am concerned with the possibility of the carbon content being too low. So I've thought about adding 1095 steel to the "stack" if necessary in order to make a sufficient billet for a sword or seax. Would anyone mind weighing in with their expertise and/or knowledge? P.S: This will be my first time ever actually blacksmithing... yes, I know a beginner making damascus is craz
×
×
  • Create New...