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Alveprins

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Alveprins last won the day on September 12

Alveprins had the most liked content!

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Norway
  • Interests
    Forging, Genetics, Astronomy.

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  1. Riiight.... Well, I suppose they've got their work cut out for them then, huh... Hypocrites, the bunch of them.... Sincerely, Alveprins.
  2. Lovely curves! I really need to get my hands on some of that walrus material... can't for the love of Odin seem to find any.
  3. Alright, so I am about to do some extensive gold inlay on a blade which will need to be fully hardened. This means that I need to cut all inlay-channels first - then harden the blade - and the do the gold inlay as cutting in hardened steel is a no-go, so channels must be cut before hardening. So - to my question... before quench, the magic number of normalization cycles seems to be three. Now, I would like to cut that down to 0 - to prevent unnecessary buildup of scale inside the inlay channels. So - this is what I have done currently... I have now
  4. Stories like this really boils my p*** as I see more and more of this from large online platforms. I am myself no longer able to run ads on Facebook due to (supposedly) selling "weapons". Same with Instagram. I am a member of engraving groups on Facebook - where they fear the groups will be shut down due to the fact that most engraving jobs are done on firearms, then knives and swords - in that order. Most recently it has come to my attention that YouTube has similar policies in regards to firearms, and monetization of such videos, and most recently people who publish hun
  5. Thank you all for your kind words! I stared at so many raven-pictures online I thought I'd go crazy, but inspiration eventually prevailed... I had budget limitations on this one as it was a commission - and I had to restrict myself. Actually, I would have liked to layer rows of feathers into each of those contours - but that would be way too costly. I would have loved to put a kind of butt-cap on the back of the handle as well, in pattern welded steel, engraved etc. etc. - but again - not in the budget. Which is why I hate working on commissions...
  6. Hi all! First - some lore! Disguised as the wanderer "Grimnir" - the god Odin once told the young Agnarr - son of King Hraudung about the god's two companions. He told the young prince about the two ravens - Hugin and Munin; which every single day flies all over the earth and brings news and tidings back with them. Grimnir (Odin) said the following: Old norse: Huginn ok Munin fljúga hverjan dag Jörmungrund yfir; óumc ek of Hugin at hann aftr né comiþ, þó siámc meir um Munin. Modern English: Hugin and Munin fly
  7. Excellent work, and a well deserved victory Mr. Mulkey!
  8. Love the ivory spacer and butt cap - especially the latter with that silver overlay.
  9. Thanks guys! Well, customer flew in from across the country yesterday to "have a look"... After a three hour tour through my forge and workshop - with a short seminar on my production process followed up by my special home made apple cake with whipped cream - he handed me a stack of the equivalent of 5,5k USD. So I'd call that a success, and a new record. Now I can continue working on the next project - which is a commission. I am starting to think this "going-full-time-bladesmith" might actually work! Until the next project is finished guys, chiao - and tha
  10. Alright, so the Old Wedge is finally completed, and the pictures are all done! History: I wanted to commemorate the importance of hand tools through out history, and especially those which were made with the expressed purpose of breaking harder materials than themselves. In this case I chose to utilize a approx. 300 year old mountain wedge which has most likely been used for everything from splitting granite to securing personnel and equipment in the now closed Silver Mines of Kongsberg city, Norway. I imagine this old wedge lying in the overwhelming depth and darknes
  11. Thank you Josh! Actually, I did put a post in that thread - but it is a few months ago.
  12. Thank you very much for those kind words Mr. Christenberry! We all draw inspiration from others, which is the great thing about the previously unimaginable access we now have to the world through the web. I think that for those of us who work in the creative genre - it has, and will continue to exponentially accelerate the development of new and unique styles. An example of this is my engraved handle frames. They are inspired by similarly framed Bowie knives that I've seen here on this forum and elsewhere, same goes for my sheaths - with a twist of my own of course.
  13. Thank you very much everyone for your kind words! Although - I ensure you though - the knife is full of irritating little flaws... Seems every time there is "something" not quite right. But I hope to continually decrease the amount of such things as I proceed from knife to knife. Yes, the airgraver has really played a pivotal role in my development so far, and there is no doubt now that engraving and inlay is most definitively the future of my knifemaking. I am currently in the process of ordering a batch of natural diamonds, rubies and sapphires as well - for future pr
  14. Hi guys, I recently posted a preview of a blade I have been working on, and I have now finally been able to finish the complete knife - sheath not included... thought I'd give a bit of a new preview of the whole thing. All inlay in both handle, bolster and blade are 24 karat gold wire, 0,7mm in thickness. Bolster is in meteorite iron - which is nerve wrecking to work with when doing inlay. Some areas are more fragile than others, and if you look closely at the "R" - you'll see the outline of a
  15. Just finished the gold inlay on this new blade - belonging to the future knife "Fornkili" - old norse for "Old Wedge". It is forged in a san-mai lamination out of an antique mountain wedge used in the Kongsberg Silver Mines - with a core of folded and twisted sawblade steel and 15n20. Proceeding with work on the handle. Very excited... Sincerely, Alveprins.
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