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Garry Keown

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Everything posted by Garry Keown

  1. so this batch of knives is finally done and ready to be sent of the new homes far and near This is the line-up and while there are a few the same and similarities in them all having rimu scales there are other differences that individualise them
  2. This is the hot waxing of the sheaths.
  3. There are 7 different sized sheaths there Timothy. Most are the hunter skinner with a boner, light hunter, 2 wapiti hunters, a bowie, 2 boys knives and the horizontal carry.
  4. This lot is ready for the final sharpening now and then they can all be sent off to new homes
  5. The wheel has .185 or just under 5mm spacing and the carbide stem is 2.5mm in dia. The other videos have finally loaded so this is starting the stitching
  6. This is making the holes for the stitching. I am still waiting for other two videos to upload to youtube so will probably post them tomorrow. All the sheaths have been done now.
  7. Chris I have a carbide stem for the drill press that is 2.5mm in dia (.1 in) and with it in the drill press I find that it is like a mechanical awl and makes a neater hole than a drill bit. I will do a couple of vids on the process later tomorrow afternoon.
  8. Sheaths all ready for sewing now with 7 different sizes for standard right handed carry, a lefty and a horiznotal carry. There is another horizontal carry cut out but the guy it is for wants a darker sheath to will get the die in a day or two. There is seven that have been stitched so getting through them slowly.
  9. Have had a couple of day on the leatherwork. After the knifework, the thread groove,makers mark and stamping was done before the top part of the belt loop was glued and sewn on. The welt was then glued in and the belt loop folded over and glued in position ready for sewing tomorrow. Then they can be folded and glued in thier final position before the thread holes are drilled and the main sewing starts.
  10. Far from skipping over the story of the journey from the research through to the making of this sword I was captivated in the first few lines and almost held my breath reading through it to see the depth of your study and preperation for this work and then the bringing it all together in such a spectacular example of the master baldesmiths art. As someone else has said words hardly seem adequate to praise the results of the time you have spent bringing this piece to life.
  11. That exemplafies the value of the forum as a depository of knowledge that we all can learn from. Excellent information shown in the simplest of ways that conveys the "how to" very clearly. Thanks @Gary Mulkey
  12. Does anyone know of a source for handle scales in impala horn scales that are 5 inches long as what I have found so far is too short. It was sugested that impala horn has excellent grip and would enhance the African theme. Giraffe bone and warthog tusk would be another two good options with buff horn being reasonably available in good sizes.
  13. Love the embellsihments on the blade.
  14. On the Africa Hunting forum a member posted a test that was done on a number of knives for the safari huner and the resuts were quite mixed but there were over $5000 worh of production knives tested with most having issues of one sort or the other added to which the sheaths came in for criticism as well. The testing started in his back yard with only 4 knives going on to be tested on US based hunts, then going to Africa and spending a lot of time in the hands of hunters, guides, and the hunt staff who all treated them to as many every day tasks as would normally be expected a good knife to perform from cutting sticks to roast the lunch time meats to skinning animals and cutting fine cigars. There was use and abuse and some very definate ideals were concreted on to a wish list. The Esee camp lore was the most ideal but didn't have removable scales as the guys wanted the ability to remove the scales to possibly replace them with bone, tusk, horn or antler from thier own trophies as time and or hunts provide and the sheath was not suitable for what was needed. Others tested were rejected for one reason or another so after consulting with what they found, I have started on a 6 pack of the knives today after confirming the design and cutting a patern from some 15N20. Steel is to be 4mm O1 HT to 59-60, with scandi grind in a horizontal carry sheath to be worn on the off side hip. Scales are olive canvas micarta secured with brass torx screws (2 only) and a lanyard hole. They have excellent reasons for each of the design criteria and I will send the first one to undergo the same series of tests that the other knives went through so am looking forward to seeing how mine stand up against the others.
  15. Thanks Chris . from the right there is beech, maple, walnut, olivewood, and jarah. All the rest are rimu, (NZ native). either plain or with jarah or ebony bolsters.
  16. Have these all with the first coat of sealer (thinned spar varnish) on them this morning so that will get sanded back to wood tomorrow and be repeated another twice before the oil finish is started so should be able to get to the sheaths and send them of in about 3 weeks. Unfortunately one of them has had to be rejected due to a flaw emerging during the last sanding stage and I can not send anything that is not up to standard.
  17. I certainly didn't take it amis at all @Charles du Preez It is a valid point and certainly one worth considering. It may in fact alter the position of the lanyard hole to leave a little more for the scale to retain strength on the thin side of the hole. As far as the @ thing is concerned I get a notice when I return to the forum. It is a good way of making sure we see the answers that others have made specific to a point in the thread. I got the sheath design sorted today and this will be another first for me as a horizontal carry has been stipulated as the prefered carry option for this knife. I expect to start work on the prototype knife this coming week so will start a WIP on it here as well as on the hunting forum.
  18. Charles , that would be a consideration that the owner would have to make before deciding on any replacment scales. To be honest I dont expect many would opt for a lanyard in any case as the proposed usage for the knife does not encourage a lanyard dangling from a horrizontal carry sheath (worn on the front of the off side hip) that could possibly catch on scrub etc in a hunting situation. It was mentioned merely as an option that would be provided as part of the base design.
  19. That would be a good solution and will keep it in mind. The thought that came to me after I had posted the question was making the lanyard hole through the micarta scales and tang but not putting a brass tube in place and that way it would be a simple switch out for custom scales with or without the lanyard hole if the owner decided he didn't need it. How do you think the micarta would hold up without the brass tube in place if it had a decent countersink. I dont see it as being a problem myself but I havent dealt with the material other than a couple of conventional sets as most of my knives have had permanently fixed wood scales.
  20. On a Africa hunting forum, I have a thread going where we are looking at a knife design that will be suited to thier needs and one of the criteria is for removable scales so they they can be replaced with thier own horn, antler etc to comemorate a hunt or trophy animal taken. That is a simnple concept with torx screw fixing but they also want a lanyard tube. I cant see how to secure it and still have the scales removable so any advice would be very welcome. I dont have a lathe or mill, so a simple rather than a highly machined fix would be preferable if it is doable. Knife steel would be 4 mm O1. Thanks in advance
  21. That has worked admirably. There is something about seeing the secondary bevel nicely even from end to end and knowing it will be much easier for subsequent sharpening when it is done like this.
  22. The natural gentle curve of the antler makes for a very gracefull handle. Nicely done.
  23. It is not stabilised. I will give it a few coats of thinned spar varnish sanded back to the surface between coats then finish with blo/tung oil mix.
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