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Garry Keown

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Everything posted by Garry Keown

  1. That is a great concept thanks Geoff and a simplification of what I had in my mind so may change horses to something more in line with this Appreciate the input.
  2. Have you got any old white ware you can take the side out of. Old washing machines etc have a nice thickness of steel to cut your patterns from. I have all mine from that and they stand up to years of use as a scribing guide to either cut out blanks from bar stock or to scribe from for your forgings
  3. I have long wanted to forge a bit of my work rather than all stock removal but my shoulder and hand are against the idea and a "friend" (lol) sugested I get a power hammer, but I dont just "get something" I like to make it if I can so another project is on the way. Another reason is that I have been enamoured of the cable damascus since the mid 80's and this is going to to be the major focus for a while. I have seen where sometimes the cable will chip on the cutting edge so there is a san mai idea to play with. I have been reserchinjg the various types of helm hammers for a couple of weeks and think I may be able to do something slightly different to what I have seen . It is a variation on the theme but has solidified into a hazy plans that may or may not evolve as the project takes shape. Picked up the first components today. Was on the back for the engineers truck as part of some old machinery that was going to the tip so it was mine for the taking away. An angle grinder with cut off wheel had it cut away and in the back of my truck in a few minutes. The big cast pulley is a grand piece of kit and will allow me to run a compact system with the drive from the motor and the actuating arm from the same pulley with a weight oposing the arm connecting side to help balance the vibration.I am going to run dual uprights and have the two pillow blocks for the drive pulley and actuating shaft off set to one side but within the foot print of the tool.The steel yard is not open for at least another 2 weeks so be a while till I can progress this tool.
  4. Picked up the first components for a Helm Hammer today. Was going to the tip so it was mine for the taking away. The big cast pulley is a grand piece of kit and will allow me to run a compact system with the drive from the motor and the actuating arm from the same pulley.I am going to run dual uprights and have the two pillow blocks for the drive pulley and actuating shaft off set to one side but within the foot print of the tool.The steel yard is not open for at least another 2 weeks so be a while till I can progress this tool. Have to blamea friend for this as it was his sugestion that I get a power hammer but I dont just "get something" I like to make it if I can so another project is on the way.
  5. Shows what paitence and determination can achieve. My hat is off to you for the effort and result.
  6. was up about 4.30 this morning (not uncommon for me) so decided to do something productive and made some lunch rolls. 3 1/2 lb flour plus a half cups each of wheat and oat bran with 8 tables spoons of milk powder. A big serving spoon of blackstrap molasses and another of malt to activate the 4 teaspoons of yeast in 24 oz of warm water, and when it is ready add 8 table spoons of best olive oil to the mix. When they were all under control I got a pot of soup on. I had cooked down 4 sheep shanks yesterday as a base so it was adding the rest this morning and have it simmering away and when done will make about 15 liters so will get it into containers for the freezer. Makes a nice easy evening meal for Sabbath day so Lyne dose not have to cook.
  7. Just finished this second ever forged oner. 5 1/2 x 1 3/16 1095 with stainless and gabon ebony furniture
  8. Just finished this second ever forged oner. 5 1/2 x 1 3/16 1095 with stainless and gabon ebony furniture I do like the forging process but this is proving to me why I need to build a helm hammer. Will get to the steel yard next week when we are able to move about again as our restriction ease down a level
  9. Yes that is a whole nuther world as far as "FIT: is concerned. It was what started the rifle fitting in England and led to the rise of the quality custom rifle stock.
  10. Very imprsssive Alex.
  11. My pot (heavy guage ss) is 8 in dia and 8 in high so with 5 in handle blocks stacked in there on their ends there is not enough head room for foam etc to use the pot walls for the guages. Have done a few sets of blocks and it is fine but I am going to get in a spare piece to have n store should I ever need it.
  12. Now that you mention it I have seen the brass one and and the suspected reason does sort of make sense but in any case it is a very nice visual on your blade.
  13. I have to show my lack of knowledge on this one and ask about the spine wrap. I wondered about in during the wip pics but thought it may become clear at completion however I am still unsure what it is for other than for added visual appeal and to show the bladesmiths skill. I kinda like the visual effect though.
  14. I dont have a try stock Gerald as often my customers are a long way from here but I do go through an indepth discussion with them and in general when someone gets to the stage of wanting a custom stock made they know what they want or rathe know what they need to ake the stock work for them.
  15. No cast Alan. I go through the full measurment list with a customer but this was his choice. For myself I do an 3/16 of cast and add another 1/16 of cant with 2 degree of negative pitch This was the butt layout of the 6.5x57 I built for myself
  16. First job today was to cut the spacer material round the butt pad and fit it to the stock and it was when I ground the toe that I realised the mistake the customer had made when he asked me to add a 1/8 spacer to the pad as the grinding revealed the spacer that was part of the pad but hidden under the surface layer of rubber. Too late to do anything about now though.Next was to mark in the cutting lines from the butt pad width down to the grip cap width and through the wrist out to the full width again at the front of the tang and cut them on the bandsaw. With some prelinary work on the comb and the front of the grip the line for the transition from grip to butt was drawn in and rasped down with coarse rat tail rasp, refined with a bastard cutand then the rear of the grip could be shaped before starting on the rest of the butt. The tools used to this stage and for all the main shaping are the fine side of the farriers rasp, the (very expensive) hand stitched french 1/2 round wood rasp and again a bastard cut 1/2 round rasp. With it sanded first with 80 grit emery then on to 180grit paper it started to look like a rifle when it was all put together again.
  17. That last pic is a very good one. Sometimes the very oblique shot loses something unless you are showing a guard face and fit
  18. A bit more progress with the 1/8 inch micarta spacer epoxied to the butt pad. Thumb notch and bolt release cut in and for this it is easier/quicker to just use a couple of soft faced clamp to tighten the action into the wood for trials as I get the recesses down to the right level. There is a lot of file a bit and check to get this right with just the few thou clearance under the bolt release. Next was some shaping to the forestock and I start by marking in the major plan lines with a specially tapered board I keep for this purpose. I always like to have a very slim fore stock as it sits down into the hand better and is an aid in aiming with it sitting like this which allows for more accurate "pointing" before you get onto the sights. Next was to get the bolt handle notch sorted and the loading port filed in. I finished the day by getting the steel grip cap epoxied into place. It is not fixed permanently as I use vaseline as release agent and fill the hollow in the back of the cap with epoxy, drill a few shallow holes into the wood round the inside of where the cap will sit and screw it into place. This way when I am doing the shaping take the cap off to get the rough shape done and only replace the cap for the final fine sanding and polish the edges of the cap at the same time. I know it will always go back the same way with a punch mark on the undersside of the cap denotes the front.
  19. Sad loss to the knifemaking fraternity if you are not able to continue making knives of that quality but hope it is a forshortened hiatus
  20. Heck, I have been here for over 65 years Josh and havent ever seen the like of that happening but then i am inclined to stear away from crazy people
  21. Just looking at those pics make me want to hold it and feel the contours in hand. Really like the treatment you have done for the blade with that finger ring really making it special.
  22. Before I started the barrel channel today I decided to put a handle on this chisel. It was my fathers and was given to him when he left one school by the one of the teachers because of his liking for woodwork so that would have been in 1935 or 6. It has had the handle broken off and used like this for as long as I remember and it has been in my shed for the last 23years so it was time to put it right. The piece of oak is from some board cut from a tree my father helped cut down and dress in about 1955 so it was apropriate to use it for this. It is one of the chisels I use for the barrel channel (I did grind the shape on it some years back) but the most used one is a smaller 1/2 inch round end and a 1 inch flat befor I start in with the scrapers It was a good place to leave it for the week with everything settled into place. Next I will fit the a spacer to the butt pad and get that and the grip cap attached so I can start to cut in the shaping lines.
  23. This the answer to that dilema Alan. http://iwasaki-y.com/english/index.html As soon as the post starts to move again I am going to ghet my agent to get me an 8 inch fine and flat from here https://www.craftsmanstudio.com/category-s/346.htm I have a logier (french) hand stitched rasp that is a beautiful tool for stock shaping but these Iwasaki files have small cutters like plane blades instead of teeth and leave a very smooth finish so they will be my main shape finishing files for knife handles over the engineers bastard cut files I use now. They leave the deep scratch / tooth marks deep into the wood so a lot of sanding is needed to remove them and the Iwisaki files will stop that.
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