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    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  

JeffM

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About JeffM

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    ceitmfg@yahoo.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SW Minnesota
  • Interests
    Woodworking, Leather working, and of course knife making
  1. Hey even if the blade is complicated and doesn't turn out perfect you should still enjoy yourself and chalk it up to a learning experience... The guys around here will all give you good advice and steer you in the right direction to help your learning curve along
  2. Toad Sticker....
  3. Nice work Gabe good to see you pull out a win....On the more humorous side of things the pommel in your hand looks like you're holding a big set of balls....LOL
  4. Wish me luck this experiment is gonna happen this weekend...Not sure how it will turn out...LOL.....for all I know this may turn out to be a drinking kinda problem before I'm done
  5. Hey Dan It would be interesting seeing your progress even as you go thru the learning curve. For me personally I've received a lot of good input that I can incorporate into future projects.
  6. Hi Gabriel Point of curiosity here for me...is there a purpose behind not having the brass guard snugged up tight against the back edge of the blade??? Overall I like the look of the wood and brass as the contrast each other and also how it matches up with the San Mai construction of the blade... Just curious about the guard
  7. Looks like those knives are ready for some serious field dressing work...Nice JOB....
  8. Hi Alan 1084 definitely is easier to work vs D2 ....so it becomes a trade off of workability vs the toughness and corrosion resistance...I think for a while I'm going to use more 1084 and 1095 steel...the D2 can sit and rest for a while
  9. Hi Gary In my experience in a hunting environment a clip point has never proven useful either. I think the double lines you are referring to is where the ferric chloride etch stops and the edge bevel meet... My goal with this knife had 2 components First was to incorporate design elements from critiques on my previous posts for using material other than D2 and focus on smooth flowing lines across the length of the knife withough putting a clunky brass guard on Second was more personal. I wanted to create something with a more rustic aged appearance that was reminiscent of the old West. This led to the ferric chloride etch and the clip point...
  10. Taking a lot of the input from my previous post and adding the contents into this knife...It's a long ways from being finished but to change things up I switched to 1084 steel...eliminated the brass guard...and am working on keeping the top of the blade aligned with the handle. So far it kind of reminds me of an old western style fighting knife...
  11. stabilising wood

    The nice thing is you can add stain or dye to the cactus juice and add some color variety to your project....as for workability....it polishes up nicely. If you are familiar with kirinite micarta or synthetic stone it is cut sanded and filed in a similar fashion. to really bring out a good polished finish I use a sewn cloth buffing wheel along with the white or tan bar that is recommended for polishing plastics
  12. stabilising wood

    Hi Peter I've used Cactus juice on several different types of wood and it works well...you will need a small vacuum chamber and pump to get the best results... Can't really offer any insights on bone or antler with Cactus juice since I haven't used either of them...but for wood I like the end result
  13. usually for wood I start at either 80 or 100 grit and work towards 400 grit.... 36 grit it pretty coarse even for hard woods...
  14. Very good work...looks smooth and flows really well....BUT the big question is can it cut watermelon??
  15. I like the idea of titanium scales....