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Joël Mercier

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Everything posted by Joël Mercier

  1. This steel uses tungsten carbides, which are right next to V carbides for hardness. I can't remember if tungsten increases red hardness though so I can't say if it's hard to forge. But from the looks of the alloying content, It could make half decent hamons. I personally don't like carbides so I prefer high hardness and hair popping low angle edges
  2. I ground my last chef purposely thicker at heel. The edge was 0.010" at heel and would progressively thin out to 0.005" over around 1.5" length. The idea came from a retired pro chef who told me he often used the heel to break small bones so he liked the German type knifes for that reason, because they have very strong heels. Problem with those knives is they are awkward to sharpen on the stones. So I kinda made an in between. It's only noticeable when you look at the edge bevels that become wider at heel, but the edge feels much stiffer there than my previous chefs.
  3. On a broader note, I'd also advise you to use the knives you make for a while. Invariably, you'll find things to improve, sometimes critical ones. You can also post your designs here and ask for advice. Some specialize in hunters, others swords, others chefs.
  4. Is it really chromed or just zinc plated? The later emits deadly fumes when heated so beware...
  5. Files are definitely piratical for pre HT finitiob.
  6. Cool stuff Conner! In the unlikely case you guys have been wondering, I'm still alive . I'm taking a break from knifemaking. I've been reading a lot about loudspeaker making lately and decided to make myself a pair of floorstanders for a change. There's a lot of science to make it all sound good! In the end, ff they only sound as good as my Oberon7, I'll be pleased . Once I'm done with the speakers, I'll finish my KITH knife I promise hehe.
  7. This is debatable. I use only carbon steel and it excels at doing what I need, but stuff like m4 or 3v is no marketing gimmick. Though you gotta know how to properly sharpen those steels...
  8. That's some good claying. If your temp is right, I'm sure you'll get nice stuff going on. Looking forward to see the result.
  9. Best of luck in these tough times, Sir. I don't believe in any religion, so I'll just have a thought instead of a prayer.
  10. Me too! They're also great for hand sanding. Much easier to see scratches.
  11. I use pinch grip a lot with my chefs and I think it gives the most control, agility and precision. Try it for a while, I'm sure you'll be sold.
  12. Yes. Pre heat it to around 130°f before quenching. Warmer oil is more fluid so it'll increase its cooling speed.
  13. Thank you @Joshua States for the kind words. Taking down the shoulders was the right choice. Those would've made the blade annoying to use in pinch grip. As for the handle, I am still figuring this out, but I think your profile is good. For the cross section, I like to use the reversed egg style because it's comfy and gives a strong grip. And I sculpt it thinner at the shoulders. It all comes down to making sure it's comfortable in both regular and pinch grip. One more thing that catched my attention was the belly of your edge. IMO I think it needs a bit of tweaking to be more progressive, especially it this area. All in all, good work man. It's going to be a very nice tool. Edit: here's what I mean by "reversed egg" cross section.
  14. Hi Alex and welcome! First of all, I would advise you not to use motor oil as a quenchant. It can emit toxic fumes and the cooling rate is too slow for most steels. Canola oil is cheap and widely available and will do fine for a wide range of steels. Second, an edge quench may be fine, except when your blade needs flex or just may flex. Depending on the proportion of hardened steel, an edge quenched blade will stay bent at various degrees if you bend it enough, while a fully hardened blade will completely spring back.
  15. Very nice! What are the dimensions?
  16. Damasteel. It's basically stainless steel Damascus.
  17. The law of thermodynamics Edit: you actually use the energy(heat) of your beer to forge, no shit! The perfect symbiosis...
  18. Here's how it looks after a month of daily use. It turned blueish but still looks good IMO. On a side note, my other blades did not turn brownish yet, only gray.
  19. That's some serious inspirational stuff. Thanks for posting!
  20. In my experience, the mustard patina will blend with the natural one that forms over time, like Alan said. It will take a good while before can't see it anymore though...
  21. Great work! Show us your next project!
  22. 26c3 is made by Voestalpine, a Bohler/Uddeholm specialty division. I really love that steel btw, but it would make a very poor sword steel. It has way too much carbon! Sandvik makes 20C, which is a cleaner version of 1095. It would be a better choice, but it still has more carbon than necessary.
  23. I have serious doubt about this statement just by looking at the alloy content. Some Cr, some Mo, some Ni and manganese of 0.6 to 1... To me it looks like a steel that will get full hardness in 11 secs oil.
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