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Warner Smith

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Posts posted by Warner Smith

  1. 56 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

    On the bright side, O1 has a very wide hardening window. Your canola oil is plenty fast for O1. So there's no doubt your steel will harden but the quality of the grain and carbides will depend on your soaks.

    Always the encouraged, Joel.   Haha.  I think I'll send these out though...I will have too much time into them to risk messing them up.  I'll start messing with the 1075 that I bought,  and actually FORGE something eventually.  Haha.  You're a good guy though...your advice is appreciated.

    Warner 

  2. 1 hour ago, Doug Lester said:

    That looks just about like what I have and should do the job for you.  One problem with using a forge for heat treating a blade with is that the pyrometer only shows you how hot it is where the end of the thermocouple is, not how hot the steel is.  With O1 you need to be able to hold the blade at just about 1475° for about ten minutes, if I remember the formula right, to get good carbon solution without getting over saturation resulting in retained austenite.  That's not to say that you can't use a muffle tube in your forge to bring the steel up to temperature and then quench it and get a good knife.  You just might not be getting the most out of the steel.  Trying to perform a soak for 10 minutes in a muffle tube takes close monitoring and is an easy way to cause grain growth.  O1 is one of those high carbon steels that is heat treated better in a regulated high temperature oven or a molten salt tank.  Steels like, 1080, 1084, or 5160 are more forgiving in the heat treat and are better for heat treating with a gas or solid fuel forge.

    Doug

    I did buy 10 feet of 1075 (1/4" x 1 1/2").  All this O1, A2, and D2 I got for free...

    Warner 

  3. 1 hour ago, Doug Lester said:

    That looks just about like what I have and should do the job for you.  One problem with using a forge for heat treating a blade with is that the pyrometer only shows you how hot it is where the end of the thermocouple is, not how hot the steel is.  With O1 you need to be able to hold the blade at just about 1475° for about ten minutes, if I remember the formula right, to get good carbon solution without getting over saturation resulting in retained austenite.  That's not to say that you can't use a muffle tube in your forge to bring the steel up to temperature and then quench it and get a good knife.  You just might not be getting the most out of the steel.  Trying to perform a soak for 10 minutes in a muffle tube takes close monitoring and is an easy way to cause grain growth.  O1 is one of those high carbon steels that is heat treated better in a regulated high temperature oven or a molten salt tank.  Steels like, 1080, 1084, or 5160 are more forgiving in the heat treat and are better for heat treating with a gas or solid fuel forge.

    Doug

    You just made up my mind.  I'm going to send them out, even though it may just be 2 knives in O1.  I'll have a bunch in A2.  I have 24 small pieces of A2 that I plan on making Puukko knives from.  Progress on the first one so far....I'm pretty pleased with how the bevels turned out.  

    Warner 

    20171125_152210.jpg

  4. I have a blade made from O1 steel (stock removal) that is ready for heat treating.  As a newbie,  I'm scared to death to get treat it myself.  My biggest concern is not knowing the actual temperature of my forge/the blade.  A friend on here told me that I need to put the blade inside of a pipe in the forge,  and get a thermistor and digital thermometer so I can KNOW what's going on in the forge.   So I need some assistance sourcing those  (which ones on Amazon?).  I've been planning on sending this out for heat treatment, and still may (with a bowie that I'm planning to make), but wanted some opinions from the community here.

         Thanks in advance, 

               Warner 

  5. 3 minutes ago, Vern Wimmer said:

    OK, now you've got;

    Boot dagger,

    Wharncliffe,

    Sheepsfoot,

    Drop point paring knife,

    And, one of my favorites,

    a scaled down (slightly),Russel Canadian pattern. 

     

    Now I'll have to look those all up.  Haha.   But thanks!

    Warner 

  6. 1 minute ago, Alan Longmire said:

    For stock removal, yes.  Provided you can heat treat it, of course!  I have forged it.  You can feel it harden up on the anvil, at which point it's already cracked. Yellow hot only, hotter and it crumbles, colder and it cracks.

    Yikes. So I'd be limited to a blade with a max height of 3/4" of an inch.  I'll have to check and see if there are some interesting patterns available for that size knife.....I'd send them out for heat treating though.  :)

                Warner

  7. So I got a bunch of tool steel for free.  I have LOTS of little pieces of A2 that are 3/16" x 1/2" x 7 1/2" (140 of these).  As small as these are, what are some things they could be used to make?  Any ideas?

       Thanks guys,

              Warner 

     

    PS - I also have 24ea of A2 that's 3/4" x 3/16" x 7 1/2"

  8. Here's the total haul:

    D2 - 1ea 5/8"x 1" x 12 1/2"

    1ea 5/8"x 1 1/2" x 12 1/2"

    1ea 1/4"x1 3/4" x 4 3/4"

    1ea 3/8"x2" x 4 3/8"

    1ea 1/2"x3/16" x 8 1/2"

    ************************************

    A2- 141ea  3/16"x1/2" x 7 1/2"

    A2 - 2ea 3/16"x1/2" x 9 1/2"

    A2 - 49ea 3/16" x 3/4" x 7 1/2"

    **************************************

    O1 - 6ea 5/8"x2 1/2" x 18"

    1ea 5/8"x2 1/2" x 5 3/4"

    1ea 3/16"x3" x 14 1/4"

    1ea 3/8"x1" x 10"

    1ea 3/16"x1/2" x 13 3/4, 15 5/8, 18" (3 pieces listed here)

     1ea 1/16"x2" x 32 1/2"

    1ea 1/16"x1/2" x 18"

    1ea 1/8x1" x 18"

     

  9. 8 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

    Just to clarify a little bit, do NOT use a MILL bastard file for grinding bevels on  flat bar stock. It will take ages. Like Alan said, it's good for straightening bevels that have already been forged to shape. 

    Someone learned it the hard way :lol:

    Joel,  if you're ever on the Chicago area, let me know.   I'll let you try some heavy duty stock removal with my mill bastard.  Haha.  It was a free workout at least.  (Now where's my double cut bastard?)

    Warner

  10. 3 hours ago, Joshua States said:

    Get a 30 gallon plastic pail and put the tank in it. Then,  fill it with water? Not knowing where you are located makes me wonder whether this is a valid idea or not. Even if you live in an area where the water will freeze overnight, you could always bring the pail into a warm area and reuse the next day, or pour it into something that needs the water.

    That's a GREAT idea......and cheap, too.  I'm in the Chicago area....

                 Thanks,

                  Warner

  11. 2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

    Best thing for that A2 is probably eBay.  It is not forge friendly or easy to HT.  It is expensive though, so you can get some capital for other tools/supplies!  

    Kind of what I was thinking.  Probably just the O1 is good for my purposes.  But yeah, I looked that stuff up and it's not cheap!   There are some nice pieces in there, too.

                      Warner

  12. So my machine shop told me they have some "tool steel" that they'll never use and if I didn't take it, it would be going in the scrap pile.  Today I stopped by to see what they have.  Here's what I'm getting.  Looks to be mostly O1, but also some A2 and a little D2.  Sizes as marked.  Can't beat the price....this will keep me busy for a while!  I have to learn about these various steels.  Trying to think of a good item to make from all those 3/16" x 1/2" A2 pieces.....

    Warner

    20171116_093528.jpg

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