Jump to content

David Forsman

Members
  • Content Count

    47
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

7 Neutral

About David Forsman

  • Birthday 05/16/1984

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    cedar city, utah
  • Interests
    hunting, fishing, outdoor recreation, metalworking, cooking, leatherworking, firearms and blades

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I've been making blades at a hobby level for the last 3 years. In the last year I've sold 4 that were commissioned by coworkers. In my opinion a 1x30 is absolutely worth the $50 it costs at harbor freight for a beginner. I spent my first 2 years hand filing and hand sanding my bevels. For a beginner this is not a fast method. I probably put in around 15 hrs per blade filing and sanding just to get to heat treat. (I only do stock removal at this point) it was exhausting. A year ago I borrowed my dad's 1x30. After making a bevel jig and a better table for the grinder I made 3 6" hunting knives in 1/8"thick 80crv2. It took me 1 hour per blade to grind in the bevels. That is a huge improvement in efficiency over my previous filing method. I don't doubt a seasoned veteran can file a bevel as fast as a 1x30 but I'm not a seasoned veteran. If you can only afford a 1x30 and a few belts go for it. You won't regret it. If you are planning on making more than a couple knives per month then you should plan for a better model down the road. Im looking to build a 2x42 for my next upgrade. I completely understand your limited budget. Most months I'm lucky to have $30 of play money. Also keep in mind the cost of belts. If you can't afford a pack of 2x72 belts then go smaller. 1x30 is much cheaper and will last on smaller blades. Work within your budget. Is 1x30 worthless compared to 2x72? Yes! Is 1x30 worthless to a noob? No, it's an improvement over nothing. My best advice is to buy the best grinder you can afford right now. For me it's a 1x30.
  2. Thanks for the advice. I will scrap the Coleman stove idea promptly. I do have a couple of bernzomatic propane torch heads for the little propane or mapp gas tanks. Is that what you are talking about? I could wrap the bricks in kwool unless that's overkill.
  3. I'm not sure if this was the right spot for this post but here goes. I've got an old Coleman 2 burner camp stove on hand that was headed for the trash because of a damaged outer shell. Im pretty sure the burners are still good. I've been looking for a better/budget method to heat my blades for hardening. Could I use the burners from a Coleman stove set up in an insulated tunnel with fire brick or k-wool? I have a source for k-wool. I probably don't need a chamber larger than 3" x 1.5" x 12". Mostly chef's knives will be heated in this setup. It will only be used for hardening.
  4. Yes, very ergonomic. The buyer had some specific features he wanted in the handle profile. Im glad I decided to give the belt grinder a try
  5. A coworker commissioned this blade. Its stock removal 80crv2. Full tang. The blade is 6" and handle is 4.5". Thickness is .128". Handle is black walnut with 5/32 brass pins. The blade was designed by myself with input from the customer. The profile was cut out on a waterjet machine. I made a bevel jig for my grinder to get even bevels( my first time grinding bevels on a belt grinder). It came out very even and more importantly in a fraction of the time. The blade and handle were sanded to 320 grit. I then edge hardened and tempered the blade and then fit and shaped the handle. Im currently working on a leather sheath with a pouch for a sharpener/firestarter.
  6. Im selling my semi locking friction folder to help fund the purchase of a cheap belt grinder. The blade is 80crv2, single bevel, sheeps foot profile. The blade is semi- finished and ready to be sharpened. Handle is titanium and aluminum with stainless hardware. I can ship anywhere in the usa. Im asking $100. The knife will be ready to ship on Tuesday morning at the earliest. I need to do some minor finish work like trimming the ends of the bolts flush and securing with loctite. I can sharpen the blade upon request. I can also ship "as is" if you want it sooner.
  7. I have 10 handle blanks in aircraft titanium, 5 tanto style blade blanks and 5 peck style blade blanks, both in 80crv2. A kit would include a handle and blade of your choice plus all the hardware needed for assembly. You would do the bending of the handle and blade grinding/ heat treat yourself. Both can be done with a propane torch although I recommend acetylene for the heat treat. Just curious if something like this would be in demand. Please comment if your interested or have questions or suggestions. Thanks
  8. I used a cnc to mill a taper into a blade once. It worked well but I went through several sets of teeth on the shell mill. Not the cheapest method by far. Im not sure if the steel was fully annealed though.
  9. Thanks for your encouraging words. I plan on participating this year for sure now unless the theme ends up being something well outside my wheelhouse.
  10. Im interested in participating in the 2018 kith. Would a project done exclusively in stock removal be acceptable for the kith?
  11. Have you considered using a die grinder or angle grinder? Ive been using a die grinder almost exclusively, and a file for cleanup. I can grind in a bevel in 10 minutes with a 36 grit pad, move to finer pads and draw file for flattening. Then water stones for final polish. Ive always struggled to maintain good control with a belt grinder. Using my method you can see the surface your working on
  12. Yes, single bevel, aka chisel grind is with a bevel on one side only. Thinking about it now though, single bevel would have been a bad choice for a clever.
  13. I see. I only saw the pic of the one side. I think they turned out really good. The next knives you make will be even better
  14. Are they single bevel? Great looking knives and great job on tackling 3 of the same. One thing I noticed in my knife making is that 99% of the population has never used a handmade knife and does not appreciate the quality and performance until they actually use one. After that, everything else seems like garbage in comparison. Gifts are a great way to increase exposure and vouching for the experience. Future bro in law came to visit over christmas and had the chance to use a kitchen knife I made. He seemed genuinely impressed at how much better it cut compared to the typical big box foriegn factory stuff. (Nothing against foriegn made products)
  15. Ive finished the knife. My coworker refined the design profile for the waterjet program. I had one scrap blade that came out wrong because the stock moved while being cut. I decided to experiment with it and came up with this. Back handle is hardened aircraft aluminum, front is titanium and blade is 80crv2. A Tri-metal knife. Also some pics of a set of 3 titanium handled knives that are christmas gifts for dad, dad in law and soon to be bro in law. One thing ive learned from this: titanium is a nightmare to tap. Especially with small diameter taps. I will probably make the tri- metal version in the future for that reason.
×
×
  • Create New...