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Larry Garfield

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  1. Larry Garfield

    Afixing brass to steel?

    Hm. All sorts of hot work that I've never done before, mostly with tools I don't have. Joy. :-) Incorporating it into a file work pattern is what I was thinking of, but since it's part of the handle I would want to fill it with *something*, I'd assume. Otherwise the back of the handle would have holes in it, which seems ungood. Affixing in brass seemed like the natural thing to try (since the rest of the knife will have a lot of brass in it already), but I guess not. What else could be used to fill in the filework gap? All I've seen online is colored epoxy, but I presume there are other options. I... suppose it may be possible to use the same wood as the handle scales, which could look interesting. I'm assuming wood->steel epoxy would be sufficient, since that's how the scales attach to the tang anyway. I'm tucking Alan's inlay post away for future reference on another project, as it looks super cool, but wouldn't fit here I'm afraid.
  2. Larry Garfield

    Afixing brass to steel?

    Fascinating and potentially useful for something else I'd planned for the future! However I think the geometry is rather different than what I'm dealing with, which probably means I didn't explain it well. Here's a picture of what the back looks like right now (which I should have posted in the first place, my bad): Rather than having wonky-shaped divots, my thinking was to file them square so I could fit square brass into them. The under-cut technique Alan described above I don't think would work here, as it's the under cut that would be showing on the edge. I'm looking for a set of clean right angle notches. Or am I just not following the geometric options properly? Or if someone else has a better idea to run past my friend I'm flexible.
  3. Larry Garfield

    Heat cycle, heat treatment, quench, temper

    Dude, I want to take your class for that line alone. :-) I'll have to watch for the shadow effect next time I'm heating a blade. The more I learn here, the more I think the instructors at my forge don't know what they're doing. (We use room temperature quenching oil salvaged from local fast food restaurants. High class operation, I know.)
  4. Larry Garfield

    Afixing brass to steel?

    Hi folks. File this under "please tell me if this is a stupid idea before I do it..." I'm working on a knife for a friend, and part of the handle has some deep dips in it toward the back. Basically I cut it a bit shorter than intended and there's some divots at the tail end in it that are too deep to just file off. In discussing what to do with it, we came up with an idea I want to run past folks here before I try to see if there's any land mines I should be aware of. Basically, the idea is to file the divots to square notches, similar to the deliberate file work I've seen people do on thicker spines. Then after heat treatment take a small chip of brass and glue it into the notch with epoxy. Once it dries, file/grind/sand off the excess brass, polish, and attach handle scales as normal. The shape of the notches below the surface doesn't matter, just the part on the exposed surface of the tang at the back. The end result: The tail end of the handle is still smooth, but has some decorative brass shapes in it. Similar concept as putting colored epoxy in, but I have brass on hand and not colored epoxy. :-) So... is this a good idea? Stupid idea? Anything I need to watch out for that would make it a good idea rather than a stupid idea? Anything I really ought to know before trying? Thanks for any warnings.
  5. Larry Garfield

    Scabbard lining advice

    Thanks folks. So here's my new plan for attempt 2: 1) Wrap the blade in felt first, then trace the outline of that for the inner layer. Then flare the tracing out a little on the opening (1mm or so, down maybe a half inch?), then hand-trace a margin around that for the outer cut. 2) Cut out the inner layer and two outer layers. 3) Use a file to flare the outer layers wider, again about 1mm thick for a half inch. So it's now 2 mm wider in both directions at the top, tapering back into a tight fit. 4) Using Elmer's wood glue, put one outer layer on the inner layer, let it dry, then line with felt on the 3 sides. 5) Affix felt to the other outer layer for where it will fit into the other. 6) Glue the second outer layer on. 7) Sand to taste. 8) Learn how to do leather wrapping for a scabbard. :-) Sound about right? How far down the scabbard should the felt go? All the way to the tip or does it not need to go all the way?
  6. Larry Garfield

    Scabbard lining advice

    @Charles du Preez Thanks. I saw that thread before, but if I follow it correctly that's a different technique. He's doing a 2 part scabbard, folded over the blade. I'm doing a 3-flat-piece construction, or attempting to. @Alan Longmire Good to know on the glue! I'd been using Titebond wood glue. I didn't think that would be an issue, but I guess I'll avoid it then. So just basic Elmer's white glue would be safer/sufficient? @Will Drake When you say you ramped up the initial opening, can you clarify what you mean? Just make the hole thicker than it needs to be and taper to smaller inside? Or do you mean in the direction with the blade?
  7. Larry Garfield

    Scabbard lining advice

    Hi again, folks. I am working on a wooden scabbard for one of my blades, using 3 part construction: Two flat pieces and a third outline piece in the middle, all 1/4" pine. My goal is to also then wrap the whole thing in leather. (This is all mostly a practice run for a blade/scabbard I want to do later.) I'm running into some issues, though. Tracing out the blade and cutting the wood was easy. When I glued the first side to the outline, though, (just basic wood glue) it of course fit not-quite-perfectly. It was slightly tight (probably I had it not perfectly positioned when clamping it), but I was able to address that by filing the inside of the outline piece with a thin file until it fit nicely. However, I also wanted to do a liner on it to help keep the blade in place since it's not a perfect fit on the sides the way my previous gouge-out scabbards have been. Easy enough, get some simple felt and glue that in, then glue felt to the other side before gluing that on. Of course, that ran into two problems. First, that meant the scabbard is now too small for the blade by the thickness of the felt. (Obvious in hindsight, I know.) Second, in testing sheathing and drawing the blade the point is constantly getting caught in the felt and tearing it. This is clearly not desirable. I tried ripping out the lining at the edges and it sort of fits, but that means less protection and doesn't solve the tip-catching problem. (In fact, it was so tight that the edge of the blade cut off the felt on the blade side while I was testing inserting and removing it.) At this point I am probably going to need to start over on it, which I'm fine with as I haven't spent much time or materials on it yet and this is supposed to be a learning project. However, I'm looking for advice on how to better handle the lining and sizing. Any good tutorials on this sort of construction? Anything that's obvious in hindsight but I probably wouldn't think of until I've screwed it up a few more times? Some pictures for reference: This is my trace outline. Inner line is traced from the blade, outer line is my hand drawn approximation of the thickness I want. With one half glued: The felt liner, after I tried ripping out the edges. Yes, it doesn't go all the way down. That's again due to the felt thickness meaning that the blade doesn't fit, so I tried doing it just at the top so it would still grip at the top. It didn't work. :-) On the plus side, it does hold the blade exactly the right snugness! It just fails in every other way. :-)
  8. Larry Garfield

    Dust collection for belt sander/grinder

    I'll look into that respirator, thanks. I also have a fire extinguisher in the hallway closet just outside the room in question. (It's my place, not rented.) For eye protection, I wear glasses so my options are a bit more limited. I've been wearing these basic things, which seem to work aside from the fogging problem. I'm open to better as long as I can comfortably wear them over glasses. As far as my current work, I've only written up my first 2 pieces so far, because I'm a lazy bum. I'm on blade 7 at the moment, I think. I posted my first blade here on the forums last year, and my second earlier this year. Most of my collection is in this picture, minus a chef's knife and a push dagger I made as a gift for a friend. (I build the shadow box itself, too. The Sgain Dubh blade on the far right is just tempered; I still have to polish it and attach the handle.) One of these days I'll do proper writeups of the rest of them. Some have delightfully self-deprecating stories to go along with them...
  9. Larry Garfield

    Forged in Fire

    Ah! So they temper and then polish, or let you polish? I always wondered how long it took to shoot an episode. I figured one long day would be tough, but I didn't realize it was three. That makes sense, I suppose, although it makes it all the more amusing when they make fun of a contestant for mistakenly using 24 hour epoxy if they really are waiting 24 hours anyway! :-) Do they overlap shooting for episodes, or do they really take 10 days for just one episode and then move on? (I always figured they were shooting the first 2 rounds for another episode while the finalists were off doing round 3 at home.)
  10. Larry Garfield

    Dust collection for belt sander/grinder

    Kerri: Thanks. On the subject of magnets, I have been highly amused to see little dots of steel dust sticking to my wall at very regularly spaced intervals. I'm guessing they're attracted to the studs or something. I love the baggie-and-magnet idea. I have some welding magnets I can do that with, too. Regarding respirators: I have been using the firm white semi-disposable face masks from Home Depot religiously when using the grinder; I'm not sure if it's the best option, though, and it does have the problem of that, combined with my goggles, the goggles fog up in about 90 seconds so I have to pause a lot to take the goggles off to defog them. Is there a respirator you recommend for hobbyist level wood/steel working, preferably one that is less likely to fog my glasses instantly? I'll check for the Polywall sheets the next time I'm at the store, thanks. I already have a HEPA-grade air filter I'm running while working and for a few hours afterward to take care of most floating crap.
  11. Larry Garfield

    Forged in Fire

    I can only imagine what actual chefs feel like after watching one of the cooking elimination shows. Probably much like folks here do watching FIF. :-) The thing that always bugs me with FIF: When do they temper? Tempering takes a hours, and we never see them even doing post-temper sanding. Do they just not do it and use brittle blades? Do they hide it well? @Geoff Keyes If you can fill that part in for us I'd love to know. It's always bothered me. :-)
  12. Larry Garfield

    Dust collection for belt sander/grinder

    Yes, steel, at grits from 60 to about 600. Also wood, mostly maple so far. There are sparks but they're dull gray by the time they hit even the table underneath them. So far no fire, or any damage other than a dirty wall. I'm trying to keep it that way.
  13. Larry Garfield

    Dust collection for belt sander/grinder

    Jeremy: I've been using a cardboard backing behind the grinder to keep dust from splattering the wall too much; it' mostly works. Yes, I run the grinder in the house. Engineered bamboo floors in there. It's either that or carry the thing outside, which is 1) Very heavy and 2) Not something I'm going to do in December in Chicago! (So far no problems other than lots of dust in the room, but...) I have a plastic tarp I can put down underneath it if necessary. Owen: When you say "Extractor", which part do you mean exactly? The bucket? Wouldn't the water in it put out any embers on contact? That's kind of the point of it... I've been using it on and off for a few months now (not daily, maybe every other week on average), and I've yet to have anything come off of it that's even slightly ember-ish. Mostly just fluffy and hard to clean. Since I don't have a purpose-built workshop space, any recommendations on safer configurations if this one is problematic?
  14. Greetings, fellow makers. I have decided I need a better dust collection mechanism for my 2x42 belt sander than the air filter in the corner, especially since I don't have a proper workshop but have a repurposed spare bedroom. My previous searching of the forum turned up a couple of examples of people building multi-hundred-dollar contraptions involving sheet metal and welding; that's thrice out of my scope. I'm looking for something more low-end. My current plan is a shop vac with a bucket catcher, with some water in the bottom to avoid explosions, and a wide-mouth utility attachment on the end, positioned underneath the belt sander. It won't be perfect, but I figure it should at least catch the majority of grinder dust, both steel and wood. Right now I'm looking at: The wet/dry shop vac just attaches to a bucket, which is good because I can remove the filter it comes with and let the dust just hit the water in the bottom of the bucket. The wide mouth attachment there is the wrong size for the hose but I've found one on Amazon that looks like it should fit it. It's a bit hacky, but it's also about $50 and doesn't require anything more complex than a clamp or two. So my questions are: Is this viable, or am I setting myself up to burn the house down? If it's not a completely stupid idea, are there any changes I should make to this plan before trying to use it? Any way I can filter the air coming out of the exhaust better? If this is an incredibly stupid idea, what's the next recommendation that doesn't involve welding sheet metal and running duct work that's out of my skillset or budget? Thank you for helping me not win a Darwin Award.
  15. Larry Garfield

    Use for brass bullet casings?

    I don't have hunting clients, or other kinds of clients; I'm just a hobbyist making knives for fun arts and crafts as a break from my otherwise all-digital existence. :-) Using the shell casings as handle pins is an interesting idea. They'd probably need to be filled with something though to give them better rigidity, no? Or is there enough glue that it's just decorative?
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