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Paul Carter

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Paul Carter last won the day on June 27

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  1. Paul Carter

    How do I lock the temper color into my blade?

    Thanks! I was afraid there was no real good way to lock in the color. Soapy water washes it right off.
  2. How can I lock the tempering color into the blade? Can this be done by quenching in oil after taking out of the temper oven? Thanks for any help.
  3. Paul Carter

    1306 layer, 3 steel Damascus

    Thank you Dave! I am here to learn and I appreciate the advice. This is what makes one better. Being able to take and follow advice without feeling criticized, which I do not. You bring up points I would have never thought about if you hadn't. Thanks!
  4. Paul Carter

    1306 layer, 3 steel Damascus

    Thanks! Yes the pattern is definitely not what I was expecting. Not really sure what I was expecting. I just went for it. I love forge welding so this I started with 6 layers of each 1080, 1095, and 15N20. Drew it out, then cut into 5 pieces. Forge welded those back together, the drilled 1/8" deep holes down the length, then hammered those flat, and formed a square. Then I twisted it several times. Then drew it out and cut in half. One half I cut into 4 pieces and forge welded them back together, and took the other half and cut into 10 squares. I took 5 of those squares and stacked them, alternating the grain pattern on each layer. Did this with the other 5 pieces also. Forge welded each stack of 5 together to form 2 billets. Then I took the other billet I made with the first half and put it in between the 2 alternated grain billets, and forge welded them together. Theoretically, with all the stacking I did, it was 1306 layers, but with all I did, it came out with all sorts of stuff going on. I like the "Screaming Skull" on the one side of the blade, near the tip. I may have missed a step in the process but you get the gist of it.
  5. Paul Carter

    16 layer Damascus

    Thank you!
  6. Paul Carter

    1306 layer, 3 steel Damascus

    Thanks! I prefer to use wood also, but always wanted to try this pearl Kirinite. This is the third knife I made with synthetic handle material. Most of my handles were made from Cocobola, but have used a couple other woods too. Because this is pattern welded steel, I use it, wash it, and put it away right away so it doesn't rust. The spine is .138" thick at the handle, tapering down to .100" near the tip, before the edge taper. The blade dimensions are 13" overall length, 7" cutting edge, and 1 9/16" wide. Handle is 5". I needed a good cutting knife for heavy cutting and chopping use, so that's what this was made for.
  7. Paul Carter

    16 layer Damascus

    Made this knife for my Daughter. It is 16 layers of 1080 and 15N20. This is the end cut from a twist billet. I did a hidden tang with a solid brass surround. I used Royal Blue Kirinite for the handle with stainless steel pins. Thanks for looking.
  8. Paul Carter

    1306 layer, 3 steel Damascus

    Hi, I'm new to bladesmithing but have been doing it for about 9 months now. Here is a chefs knife I made for myself. It is 1306 layers of 3 steels, 1080,1095, and 15N20. I did many different things to this to get to 1306 layers, not just simply folding it over and over again. I twisted it, drilled raindrop pockets, alternated the grain pattern, etc. The handle is made from white and black pearl Kirinite which I glued together to make each handle scale. Used 3 brass 1/4" dowels to secure handle. It's super sharp and cuts incredibly well. Thanks for looking!
  9. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    Thank you!
  10. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    Around here, the spring shops only charge like .50 cents a pound for old leaf springs. Most automotive coil springs are also 5160. The metallurgist from our school says that Toyotas from the 90's and early 2000's have the best 5160 leaf springs out of all she has tested.
  11. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    Thanks!
  12. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    Thank you!
  13. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    I did not know that. That is good to know, Thanks! Does African black wood need to be stabilized?
  14. Paul Carter

    My latest knife made from 5160 leaf spring

    Actually, I did not use a flash. My camera phone doesn't have a flash. That was just light reflecting from my kitchen lights. Next time I'll try to get pics outside.
  15. Here is a knife I made out of a piece of 5160 steel cut from a cars leaf spring. I made the guard from copper and brass plates glued together with blue and purple epoxies, held in place by two 1/4" copper dowel pins. Handle is made from Ebony hardwood. A brass, and a copper pin hold handle in place with epoxy dyed black. Spine of knife was blued with a torch without heating the edge by making a trough from aluminum foil and filling it with heat barrier gel, then submerging the edge in it while heating. I would be interested in hearing of other ways to turn a blade blue without using gun bluing as it turns steel more black than blue. As an experiment, I etched this blade in Ferric chloride after heat treat to see what would happen to 51 series steel. It left behind these spots that look gold in color when viewed in the light. Might just be rust spots but they don't seem to be rust. Any rate, it makes the blade look old so I left it as I like the look. This is the 7'th knife I've made. I've been experimenting with different handle types. This handle is heavy, but I like it as all the weight is in your hand so it makes it feel like there is no blade on it when handling it. Overall length is 10.625". Blade width is 1 1/4". Blade length is 5 3/4". Weight is .85 lbs or 386 grams.
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