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Will W.

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Will W. last won the day on July 14

Will W. had the most liked content!

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  • Location
    New York State
  • Interests
    Any kind of metalworking, the history of bladesmithing, smelting, gunsmithing and shooting, traditional archery.

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  1. Everybody has their own order in which they do those things. You just have to do it and see what works for you. That being said, I rough shape the scales while attatched but not riveted to the tang, finish grind, polish, mount scales, finish scales, then sharpen and touch up the polish if needed. This is simply my method, and by no means a set in stone guide to follow. Like i said, you gotta figure out what works for you.
  2. Will W.

    First Casting

    It is a lot of fun, for sure. Its exciting to be under pressure, have to move quick or it will solidify on you. I want to get into lost wax casting. Not sure i have the know-how yet, but the obsession has begun
  3. I would do at least two pins, to reduce stresses from torsion on the scales. One pin, and the scales can rotate around that axis. Pins are incredibly easy. Cut a piece to size, insert in hole, peen both sides, file flat. I typically peen one side of the rivet before inserting into the handle, that way i only need to peen one side. I find it easier and more effective. You dont need clamps for epoxy. If you apply the epoxy, then peen the rivets tight, they "clamp" the scales right to the tang for you.
  4. Will W.

    Mild steel test

    That anchor is so cool. Would make one helluva decor piece...
  5. Will W.

    Another W.I.P. blade in the works...

    Youre going to need a vise. Some clamps and a table at the very least. I would make that a priority. Some files will clean that tang up just fine.
  6. Will W.

    Royal Impala

    Beautiful! It flows wonderfully. The impala horn looks like it was worth the headache. Crisp hamon as well.
  7. Will W.

    Nakiri

    I like the patina, and the nice crisp lines of the handle. Nice one, Joël.
  8. Will W.

    Mild steel test

    This should give you a good idea.
  9. Will W.

    Mystery stainless steel

    Lol true enough. But its still applicable information for fittings, guards, etc. Just figured i would clarify.
  10. Will W.

    Mystery stainless steel

    Just to play devils advocate here, i assume you mean stainless blade steels? S90V, 440C, etc.? Because i have forged 303, 304, and 316L without any problems. You just have to watch your temps. Forging blade steel quality stainless is another story entirely...
  11. Will W.

    Little finger

    Wow, points for originality! Very neat.
  12. Will W.

    Another W.I.P. blade in the works...

    I once drilled pin holes in a tang with a hand drill. Not an electric one... one of these: Never again lol.
  13. Will W.

    Another W.I.P. blade in the works...

    You can also clamp aluminum plates in the vise on each side of the blade to act as further heat sinks. You can spot temper by chucking up a piece of round stock in your drill press and applying pressure to where you want to drill. The friction causes the spot to heat up. Old machinists trick.
  14. Will W.

    Another W.I.P. blade in the works...

    Solid carbide bits are quite expensive, yes. But they are worth it. I would still use caution though. Hardened blade steel is no joke to try to cut.
  15. Will W.

    Another W.I.P. blade in the works...

    Carbide drill bits will chew through hardened steel better then anything else, low rpm, use a coolant/oil, and back off the pressure a bit. Dont get it too hot. Im talking actual carbide bits, solid carbide, not those coated little pieces of junk. Buy quality, and they'll last you a long time. Im not sure if feed and speed charts accommodate hardened steel, they do for annealed tool steels, so you may want to base your drilling off that. But dont be surprised if you break several drill bits. ...Or just soften the tang...
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