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Martin Tiney

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  • Content Count

    9
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  • Last visited

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Finedon uk
  • Interests
    Clay pigeon shooting, range safety officer for the local gun club vintage radio , film camera collector
  1. Thanks, I never thought of re purposesing a drill bit for making a touchmark, I have a selection of industrial sds drill bits I shall try one of those at the weekend
  2. Can anyone offer me any advice making a touchmark stamp to mark my blades with? Would silver steel (drill rod) be a good metal to use? I generally use carbon steel 1075,1080,1095
  3. Unfortunately the open top bearing is a trade off, the lube in those particular bearings was more like concrete, causing the belt to skid over the rollers,! The roller on the tension arm, however are fine, as and when I get more rollers I will change them to sealed type. I'm working on an exratracter fan to realeve some of the dust, in keeping with the ethos of the eco grinder ( my mates think I'm just to tight to part with cash!!) it being made from the cooling fan from a dead electric fan oven !!
  4. More photos of the eco grinder
  5. I started this project earlier this year, my aim was to build a belt grinder for as little as possible, and using as many re purposed parts as possible. The bench grinder was a faulty item I rescued from the skip at work, ( I work in a garage so most parts are from the skip) a faulty switch was the problem, so all that was needed was a strip and clean. The main bracket was cut from a Ford transit minibus side step, another skip find, the roller bearings are cam belt idlers, I had to wait a while to get matching rollers The bottom pulley was made from knot free hardwood I had, the only items that cost money apart from the belts was the backing disc for the linisher, a selection of Allen cap screws and the 30mm angle iron for the tension arm. Tracking is a bit more miss than hit and the motor is slightly under powered at 2/3rds HP and a little slower than I would like, but it works and it beats filing bevals by hand! The cost?? £8.38 not including belts and discs....... I'm happy with that
  6. Erm..... The Cork ones are made of Cork, but the metal ones are indeed made of metal
  7. Hears a plan, save all the bottle tops, forge them into damascus, then forge into a blade....... The ultimate in recycling
  8. I did cheat A little with this knife , I downloaded a template from dcknives.blogspot.com ( HOPE I DON'T GET INTO TROUBLE FOR THAT !), it's not exactly the same, a little longer / wider etc, The 1075 was a treat to work with, just using hand tools and it tempered really well.
  9. Hi guys I'm new to the forum have only been making knives for a couple of months, I thought you might want to see my first attempt, Made from 1075+cr and hardened and tempered in my converted gas cylinder coal forge. Forge scale was left on intentionally as I though it was "different" The scales are special to me, the were made from an oak branch that was cut from a tree in my garden, the tree was grown from an acorn about 25 years ago by my son, so as I said special to me. I gave the knife to my son this Christmas and he loves it I've started the next project a Tanto, but with 6 bevels to file and get symmetrical it's proving to be quite a B #@ch! Perhaps I should have finished the belt grinder first!!
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