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Tim Frost

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Tim Frost last won the day on November 3 2018

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  1. The stainless toilet roll holder looks perfect for the job. I used a stainless toilet brush holder for mine. Great size and proportions. I also live alone, so no complaints here I reckon the handle looks great. Clip = refers to the dished shape at the point of the knife (I think). I am also new and learning terminology.
  2. These knives are inspirational. There is something to be said for the clean, simple lines and beautiful handle wood. As someone very new to the knife making world, it's easy to get distracted by the damascus patterns and elaborate designs. But this is what I want to achieve. Also, good job on the photography
  3. Never tried. Just stumbled across them and since I know people use stainless pins at times, it occurred to me that this might be useful. I have no knowledge of the variability in hardness/workability of stainless. But expect it is much harder to work with than the brass I have used. Might give some a go in the future, but do dread the idea of filing them.
  4. Hello all, I had salvaged some old, discarded computer printers as I wanted a motor etc for another project. In dismantling the printers, i found that there were many steel (apparently stainless?) shafts. I have recovered a wide variety and presume these would work well for knife handles etc. The only obvious drawback to me is that you now have a load of rubbish plastic to discard. As old printers are very easy to find, this might be a good option for those on a budget or with a recycling mindset.
  5. I'm also very keen to see this. I have just started thinking about building a forge. Finding the idea a little exciting and this burner looks very competitive - assuming they ship to Aus.
  6. Thanks Alan and Joel. I've already done hours of sanding, so it will be emotionally difficult to go back to draw filing, but that sounds sensible. I think I have left a bit much material on the edge anyway, so probably for the best.
  7. I don't know what a hard back is? I am using wet and dry paper wrapped around some rectangular aluminium tubing. This could be a factor of the gentle slope to the bevels. It is not very thick steel (4.3mm) and the bevels go pretty high.
  8. Hey guys, I have been slowly working away on my second knife (stock removal). Things are mostly going well. This one is intended to be useful around the camp for chopping small branches for kindling and fending off drop-bears. I decided to use some power tools this time as hacksawing through steel isn't fun and this one is rather large. My angle grinder control is rubbish, so I clamped the grinder to a bench and used it like a "table grinder". This helped a lot. I have just finished filing the bevels and am now miserably sanding. I am disappointed to see that the hard line differentiating the bevel from the flat area has become very faint. Anyone have good tips on how to keep this sharp? I am considering diferentially sanding - go for a polish on the flats while leaving the bevels finished with a courser grit?Any thoughts?
  9. This is beautiful. Thank you for sharing. I have nothing useful to add, only appreciation.
  10. Hey all, Sorry to spam the forum, but wanted to properly acknowledge and respond to those who assisted - I was away camping and didn't reliable reception for a detailed reply. Thank you. I figured that a professional knife maker would work much more efficiently and effectively than I would at sanding, BUT, I should still be able to approach their quality of finish through sheer stubbornness. I didn't quite get there - Little issues here and there that I didn't notice or didn't want to notice at the time. Disk sander makes sense! Joshua - This level of detail and advice is very much appreciated! I used a jig for my previous knife, but it relied on me being able to clamp the knife down consistently. I was a millimetre or 2 off. I think a combination of your advice and this jig should help me achieve consistent bevels AND plunge lines. As for why the curved plunge line? I saw some on knives in a google image search and liked it, but no reason I know of other than aesthetics.
  11. Thanks for all the advice and feedback guys. I might park the idea of the curved plunge line for now (though a disk grinder seems logical). There appears to be a strong consensus on the scale thickness. Consider the lesson learned!
  12. I think the word I wanted might be "plunge line"? The plunge line is curved instead of straight. Sorry, lots of new words and I don't think of them when I need them all the time!
  13. No no, not the scales. I'm talking about the filing of the curve into the steel. The transition to the blade bevel out of the ricaso isn't a straight line. I drew it as a curve (reckon it looks nicer). Filing a straight line should be easy as the file is straight and all you have to do is keep a steady hand. But to get a consistent curve? Not sure how to achieve it. If this isn't making sense, I can post some pics to explain what I am trying to say - hopefully I am suing the correct terminology and not confusing things.
  14. Hi Joel, Thank you. I deliberately made the scales thick thinking these would sit more comfortably in the hand. I like the feel of the handle less and less as time goes on, I guess this might be part of the reason why. I also dislike the curve which is a bit too pronounced. Further to this, I sketched the transition from the ricasso into the bevel curved - thought this looked good. Sitting here, I can't really see how I would be able to achieve this symmetrically on both sides of the blade. Is this likely too ambitious? Anyone have advice? I had trouble lining up my bevels on the first knife, but you can't see in the pics. Note: I am hand filing for stock removal. This is already going to be a huge job given the size of the blade and the (poor) quality of my files.
  15. Thanks Alan! I agree about the bevels, they DO look a bit low now that you mention it.The wood on the first is Casuarina (from wiki: "Commonly known as the she-oak, sheoak, ironwood, or beefwood"). Made the scales from a fallen branch from my Uncles property.
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