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AubreyHummer

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  1. Ah I see. I'm not sure why I thought you were bedding the tangs first and then taking them out to drill the pin holes. Makes much more sense now.
  2. Pants colored ink wasn't invented yet. We're just supposed to imagine pants
  3. Love watching your progress, always learn something! When you bed your tangs, what do you coat the tangs with to release them? and how do you clean the release agent from inside the slot after?
  4. Catching or blocking a blade on the spine of a knife seems to be an awkward technique. If you're holding the spine indexed toward yourself you would have to bring your hand all the way across your body to have the spine exposed. But I guess the strip overlaps the sides of the spine so you could catch your opponent's edge with a little angle of your knife as you backhand parry or something? At least they look nice sometimes
  5. What is the purpose of these brass strips? I've seen them before but just don't understand them.
  6. If you're having trouble with inspiration because you feel limited in your capabilities (be it tools or skill wise) then you should spend more time doing the things that you ARE currently capable of. As you get better and better at exercising your basic skills you will also develop ideas and designs of how those skills can be applied to other areas. Any time you struggle with motivation or inspiration, the first response should be to get back to work. Even the simplest task related to what you know you should be doing. The more time you spend not working, the harder it will be to get back to work. Being hands on is a driving factor for your mind to develop thought processes and "momentum of thought" which will drive you forward to new ideas and skill acquisition. I know this has been a "woo-woo BS" kind of answer, but you're not going to find inspiration that will overcome tool and skill deficits. Everyone has skill and tool deficits just at different levels. The goal is to exercise your current skill sets which will allow you other opportunities for experimentation and exploration and thus developing new skills to exercise. However, I personally like to look at frame handle bowie pictures in image search to get my pulse up. If I look at too many it is discouraging, but if I spend three-four minutes looking around It gets me pretty excited.
  7. The wood is American oak. They are bourbon barrels from four roses distillery. Im not sure how long these will take, we have a baby on the way at the end of July and we will be staying at my wife’s parents house for most of next month. But I will keep everyone posted!
  8. Will and Alan- thank you very much for the guidance. I had not considered 15n20 and that is the route I will pursue. There is no silver flaky stuff on the hoops i think they were just painted. So that should make things easier. I will be breaking down the barrel this weekend to start drying out the wood and will do some testing with the hoops as well.
  9. Hi Jake- thematically I want the set to support that the contents of the barrel outshine the rustic exterior. I plan to do an FeCl etch and coffee darkening to make the core steel stand out against the dark contrast of the iron. Using the wood is somewhat straightforward and expected, but incorporating the barrel hoops would put this on another level.
  10. I have a project in mind and looking for considerations on how to choose an appropriate steel. I recently obtained some whiskey barrels and want to make themed steak knife sets. I'd like to use the barrel hoops to jacket some stainless steel for the blades and use the wood for scales and presentation box. What I've found so far is that the hoops are typically galvanized iron. The barrels have lightly rusted rings so I believe the galvanization has mostly gassed-off, and I will be cleaning the surfaces thoroughly before attempting to forge weld. When choosing a stainless steel for the core, what characteristics/composition should I be looking for to set up a potentially good forge weld? Would I have more success forge welding the hoop material to a carbon steel medium and then to stainless core? So the composition would be something like this: (Hoop)-(1084)-(Stainless)-(1084)-(Hoop) Or is there a stainless steel that could be forge weld friendly with the iron? Any direction would be appreciated!
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