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Jakob Staffans

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  1. What's the bore and stroke on that one? Looks enormous! You should get cracking on the build with that one Jeremy also, you have the material now! You said you have the I-beams, the anvil and cylinder!
  2. That's an impressive load of material. The double cylinder idea is interesting, maybe challenging. There are not many home-made models with two cylinders. I'm sure it would work though. I'll have to comment more on all the material later. Were you able to view the facebook photo album?
  3. My current hammer is the one in the picture, that's a continuously hitting hammer for general forging. I can do single hits with it if I step on the treadly quickly. The one I'm thinking of building but have not yet decided on would be similar. A continously hitting hammer, using electric sensors to adjust an electrical 5/2-valve. Single hit hammers are used for precision, where you only one want hit. They're useful if you need too evaluate the forging during the forging, which is often useful. Hit once, check, hit again, check. Or for stuff like stamping logos or doing fullers or set downs,
  4. If I were to build my hammer again I would use electrically actuated valves. Like in this video, observe though - this hammer is a single-hit-hammer but electrical valves can still be used in a continously hitting hammer. With my current design the ram is banging into the roller valves mechanically. I bought the stronger type of roller valves and they're still made of plastic. I expect them to break eventually. The only drawbacks to using electrical valves is that you need a $15 inverter also, and of course electricity. The valving is literally the simplest thing e
  5. Copy whatever you want! There's no copyright on this. Not much originality either, save for the frame perhaps. But that's free to use too. What cylinder do you have, and compressor? What frame are you thinking of? I saw some videos of your hammer. Good job! Is blacksmithing your trade or hobby? You don't have a website? How's the shop working out for you? I was wondering since I saw it's snowing in sometimes! I'm kind of comfortable and want a heated shop ... I'm building a shop at the moment ... Let's see if this link works. It should show a photo album of the hammer build, and b
  6. Hey all, Does anyone know what the cylinder stroke is on a 200 lb Chambersburg Utility hammer with a 5'' bore? By the way is it precisely 5'' ? I'm asking because I built a hammer already, a smaller version with a 90 lb ram weight and a 2½'' bore, 10'' stroke. I'm dreaming about a new hammer in the future that would have the same size cylinder as the 200 lb Chambersburg. I'm a big fan of old Chambersburg hammers but they're pretty hard to come by in Europe, Finland. I'm thinking of buying this cylinder to use in my next home made hammer: Price is 120 €/cylin
  7. Hey, can I ask you what the cylinder stroke is on a Chambersburg Utility hammer with a 5'' bore? By the way is it precisely 5'' ? I'm asking because I built a hammer already, a smaller version with a 90 lb ram weight and a 2½'' bore, 10'' stroke. I'm dreaming about a new hammer in the future that would have the same size cylinder as the 200 lb Chambersburg. I'm a big fan of old Chambersburg hammers but they're pretty hard to come by in Europe, Finland. I'm thinking of buying this cylinder to use in my next hammer: Price is 120 €/cylinder. Rod 1 and 3/16 in Bor
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