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Jacob Barlow

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  1. It also seems that maybe your angle is a bit too much. Ideally you want the angle to such that when your edge thickness is where you want it (dime size for reference) the bevel will be at the height that you want it. It seems your edge is still a bit thick. If you stick with the angle that you have your jig at, and keep working the bevel, it will take the edge thickness down at the same time, it will bring your grind line higher. I don't use a jig, but with freehand grinding, as the edge thins and the grind moves towards the spine, the top bevel line may straighten out a bit as you go alon
  2. Thanks for the replys. I watched the video. I may have to give that method a try. It looks very interesting.
  3. Don Abbot I Pm'd you. Got the copper piece, gonna clean it up and get to work! Thanks again!!
  4. I am gonna use it on the end of a wooden block and do the actual etching with it. There are several good stencil makers that can make you some stencils that will last a long time. Vinyl won't last too many etchings.
  5. Gotcha. Makes sense. Would you be willing/able to cut me a 2"x1" piece of that copper and sell it me? If not, as close as you are willing/able to do and I can trim/cut it on my band saw?
  6. What do you mean by "clean"? The etch wouldn't be as clean? Or the piece of metal itself?
  7. Forgive my ignorance but would that work for a home made etching machine? I have only ever heard brass or stainless. I appreciate the response!
  8. Just looking for a piece of brass or stainless steel for a homemade etching machine. Maybe 1.5-2"x3" or so and 1/8" thick. Not wanting to buy an entire bar stock just for this small piece. Will obviously pay shipping and for the material as well. Thank you.
  9. New knife maker here. Starting out doing some stock removal to get my skills down. Then I hope to move into forging my own blades. Since I’m new, I’m not very good at grinding. Since I have no experience at all, I got 2 different types of jigs and for a reference I free handed. I got Fred’s bubble jig, a creative man beveling jig/file guide, and then obviously free hand grinding. I went to Home Depot and got some mild steel and cut out a few knife blanks. To keep the results consistent I made the same style knife for all three. The first two pictures are using the bubb
  10. Well I missed out on this deal by five minutes this morning. All three of these anvils sold for $1200. Hoping one of you guys on here snatched them up near Pittsburgh.
  11. I haven't seen the anvil in person. Saw it on CL. There is a bounce test video, looks and sounds really good though. Asking $875 and says it weighs around 200lbs. "HAY-BUDDEN? 200 LBS BLACKSMITH ANVIL Can not see a label. Appears to be a Hay-Budden has S/N on front foot under horn left side 37866. Based on this S/N if a Hay-Budden would be 1898 manufacture. 29 1/4” long, horn is 11 1/2” ;long, 17 3/4” x 4 1/2” face 11 1/2” high . 1 1/8” hardy hole 11/16” Pritchel hole. Feet 11” x 10” solid top excellent ring and rebound." https://youtu.be/dPlmUoHgr1s
  12. Saw this anvil for sale locally. Says it is probably a Hay Budden. What are your thoughts?
  13. Gotcha, I'll be sure to warm it up to 100 degrees F. Was going to use an electric charcoal starter to warm it up and use a turkey fryer thermometer to check temp if that is an acceptable method. Yea I read about the "9 second oil etc..." and how it relates to a nickel ball quench, so they have a uniform comparison across all those mediums.
  14. Thanks so much for the information. The 1084 that I have is 1/8" thick by less than 2" wide. So I should be good to go?
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