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Welsh joel

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Everything posted by Welsh joel

  1. Something I've done is used sticker vinyl. Wrapped it like a tape, overlapping around the handle. Tight and overlapping- it's waterproof enough for ferric etch. Heat gun will soften it a little, get into more nooks.
  2. I don't... lol. It's a stabilized pine cone scale set. My first thought was to make the scales smaller than the tang- to leave the pattern exposed & visible. It's uncomfortable to hold, and the pinecone is very brittle where exposed. It cracked, and I didn't like the way it felt in hand- so I have yet to decide what's going on it. This was my first hand hammered damascus blade. Plan on keeping it for myself, so I'm watching for something else I like for it!
  3. Jaro hit it on the head. But, here's my take on it... If you get a good, proper forge weld- any side of the knife can be the edge... the only reason it matters then, is cosmetic. At that point- it's all solid steel. Generally- in a plain stack pattern, or a layered setup like San mai, or go mai... you use the edge of the stack after you forge weld them together and draw out flat. This puts the layers parallel with your cutting edge. When ground through, the contrast is revealed in the sides of the blade. Different patterns, especially more c
  4. My forge splutters a bit at low temps... but when it warms up it evens out. Maybe yours will as well when she gets up to heat. Mine's not a ribbon burner though.?
  5. I lurk alot lately, haven't posted much- because I haven't touched a blade in a couple months. Life's thrown a monkey wrench in my forge time, it's getting cold here in the midwest- which I hate with a passion. And work has been crazy lately... last couple days this past week has been 0700 morning to 2130 or 2200 at night. Long days.
  6. I replaced many over the years as a HVAC tech on furnaces, compressor units etc. I've recently replaced dual capacitors on an air compressor setup. I'm not saying it's smart, or proper... but I have never discharged, or waited for one to dissipate. Using insulated wire pliers- I just pull one lead at a time from the capacitor while it's still mounted. - take note of which wires go where... Tape across the body of capacitor with electrical tape- covering terminals without touching them. Pull body from mount, insert new- an
  7. Only critique I got- I dont own it. That finished out nicely!
  8. After all- 42 is the answer....
  9. ^ they're correct about venting. I used to work in an aluminum foundry where we cast large aluminum intake manifolds. And other parts. V8 manifolds had a vent tube on each runner end on the intake. Usually these were just 1/4" to 3/8" diameter or so. Even with a large pour hole- once the molten metal fills the hole- there has to be a place for it to push the air and steam out of the mold, or it can/will vacuum lock the metal in the mold- and cool... causing incomplete pours. Our hunter sand casting machine molds had rods coming out to make the
  10. In my experience- yes. I have a graphtec 24" vinyl plotter. I've used it a couple times as etching masks. I use automotive/sign grade vinyl. I've also done sandblasting, and cerakoting with it with a "high temp" vinyl.
  11. Peter- you can easily see progression! Your grinding game has definately improved... I'd say- keep going!
  12. I just picked this up to try... haven't used it yet, but was recommended.
  13. Got a little time in the forge today... The scrap damascus got drawn out into a smaller hidden tang dagger shape. It's basically layers layed criss cross over each other. Some squares, some lines in a random pattern. Just screwing around... but got back on the anvil!
  14. Good looking shop setup. Jealous....lol. I live in the country, but my house is single story- built into the ground with attached garage. So, I have to be conscious of monoxide levels... forging in the garage is out for my comfort level. Township codes and my yard- deny me the ability to put up a pole barn... so, What I play in.
  15. 5160 doesn't like to forge weld to itself well- in my limited experience trying it... But I've had good success using it between other steels. That feather is actually 15n20, 1084, and '70's VW beetle front beam springs! I've got quite a few spring stacks given to me, as well as several coil springs- so I'm getting ready to do some myself. Hopefully your forge serves you well Jon! its looking good now. Stubborn... stupid.... Same thing right? Lol.... Just turned 49, and yeah- soon as I can afford a press.... aaahhhhhh........
  16. Looking much hotter there than your last pic. Time to mess up some steel! Lol... Theres still some things to practice to get good at forge welding- I'm not perfectly practiced at it by far. Be prepared the first couple tries- to do a couple hours worth of work... just to have it fail. But, that's what gets you there. 5 hours of hand hammering... to have one failed weld.
  17. Just a side note- wanna see if youre getting/hitting forge welding temps... When you think you're getting closer: Throw a piece of that thin band in there, and just let it heat up. With square cut ends- if youre hot enough to burn the steel, the thinner stuff will do it quicker as a test... and you'll probably see the corners of the cut dissappear and the end will burn off rounded. If you're getting hot enough to destroy the steel- then you're well in range to forge weld... at that time- it's all on you for control. Color differences- theres alo
  18. ^ Rob, they make some good points... But your response makes an even better one I think. The best way to get better- is two fold: 1. The ability to recognize, learn from, and improve on mistakes & the methods that made them is the only way to get out of a rut of just repeating them. You must keep trying to do all of the above! IE- keep f-king up. Lol... 2. The importance of understanding honest criticism from peers or seniors- and applying it without anger or attitude... is key to that improvement. As a sixth knife- it's still good
  19. I honestly- wouldn't put doors on it just yet... I think I'd just use a couple fire bricks, or pour some refractory slabs to use... that you could just position in front of it for now. Use it as is for some time. See how it heats, get used to how it runs and burns- and what tuning adjustments you make to get optimal temps from it. Make little changes as you go- versus bigger changes that are harder to come back from. I speak from experience building and modifying mine. The main reason I think you should hold off on doors- Is it looks li
  20. I honestly- wouldn't put doors on it just yet... I think I'd just use a couple fire bricks, or pour some refractory slabs to use... that you could just position in front of it for now. Use it as is for some time. See how it heats, get used to how it runs and burns- and what tuning adjustments you make to get optimal temps from it. Make little changes as you go- versus bigger changes that are harder to come back from. I speak from experience building and modifying mine. The main reason I think you should hold off on doors- Is it looks li
  21. What Alan means is that even at the tank- with a forced air system, you shouldn't or won't have a steady pressure reading on the guage... My attempt at explanation- the force of the air flow thru the burner pipe will or should- suck the gas into the pipe and burner as fast as it flows. This will drop your line pressure guage down to zero pressure, even though you still have a 2psi flow coming out. The effect is zero line pressure with full flow. My forge runs the same. I have a shut off valve at the forge- when closed, I read pressure on my
  22. So my brother gave me a marble slab... 3ft x 5 or 6 ft x 1" thick. I was thinking to use it for a workbench top- could lay hot steel on? But, anybody have any other suggestions for a better way I could use it?
  23. Last night I did a little prep work for a young man that wants to try forge welding cable. Got him a piece cut and welded to a work stick. The rest is up to him for learning... lol. The other bits are going to be a "scrapmascus" attempt. Figured I'd challenge myself with the 3/8" wide pieces I'd had leftover.
  24. Another thing to remember with damascus- you'll have to re-etch it with acid when finished forging and grinding... to bring the pattern back out.
  25. I welded mine of course- But one of the thoughts I had to make it more removable, was to make my collar for the burner... and use four or five 90 degree angle brackets to screw to the body of the forge, and into the collar. Alan is describing kind of the same thing, but just making the brackets integral to the collar. Good thinking. Depending on how you did it, you could use longer bolts with extra nuts on them to maintain positioning Of the burner. In the end, I just bit the bullet and bought more welding wire.
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