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Lamey

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  1. thanks guys, it was fun to make, and headed way down Southeast.... near Miami.
  2. thanks, Kenon the plunge lines are just ground on the flat platten, right at the forged bevel at the edge/choil.
  3. Always hear talk and see photos of the "Southwest" Bowie, but sure dont hear much mention of the "Southeast" or more commonly called "Southern" Bowie. The differences in my view and experience are in the "Southern" Bowie having a fairly straight back or spine, shorter clip, and lower tip. The "Southwest" In my view generally has some upward arch to the spine, and a longer higher tip. I know they are just "names" and share more characteristics then they differ, but I do like to respect those distinctions between the 2. A few quick pics of the "SOUTHEAST" Bowie I finished today Blade is 10-1/4 x 1-7/8" x .350+ at the ricasso, overall length is 15-1/4", handle is of course Black Walnut. Thanks all!
  4. Thanks guys, toxonic i know the exact issue you are referring and I had the same thing... just took a little while and carefully blended it all in. Ive seen guys use several methods, one was a half round file, they just cut the transition by hand (I do believe this was Nick Wheeler.... leave it to Nick to do it the "perfect" way). Ive seen one or 2 just roll the edge of there belt over the edge of the platten and grind the transition contour that way.... seems a bit tricky to me but i may experiment with that. Some use the cool little Integral grinders like Uncle Al sells, its basically a platen that is runs front/back, up where your idler pulley is on a regular grinder. The end of the platten has a 5/8" or so weel so you get a nice even transition from plunge to blade flat, PLUS all your "scratches" are running evenly from plunge cut to tip. THIS IS WHAT I WANT if i do many more of these integrals. What I did on this one was cut the plunge in with a 2" wheel, then carefully blend the flat in by hand and rotary platen. anyhoo, it was fun.
  5. thanks guys, it was definitely fun to make, and will be making more.
  6. This is the first "finished" integral ive made, ive forged several, but never gotten around to finishing one until now. This blade was actually forged over a year ago, just havent made the time to finish. Any how, forged from a bar of 5/8" W-2, 7" blade, 11-7/8" overall, Ceylon Ebony handle. Fun to make, going to be doing more of them. Learned a bit making this one, the hardest part for me was figuring out a good way to grind them, specifically transitioning from the bar to the blade... tricky. A few pics-
  7. I really like it, and it looks like it would sure be a cutter.
  8. Been a while since ive posted, trying to play catch up and dont have much time for the computer nowadays. Forged 1095 & Stag Bowie, overall length is 15-1/4", blade is 10-1/4" x 1-7/8", .260 thick at spine. Guard/pin/butt cap are stainless. Thanks!
  9. I was only there Friday aternoon/evening, had some stuff come up that occupied my Sat/Sun. The knife cut good, but i didnt do my part....my "aim" was just a bit off!
  10. Lamey

    Jungle Honey

    hi Mat, your right the blade on this one is 16-1/2", 32" overall. Will be shipping to its new owner on monday, have 3 more to finish.
  11. thanks all, Jerry call next time your in town and we can visit in the shop.
  12. Kind of an "old school" chopper for me, no fancy curves, no fancy handles, just a very basic, very sharp cutting tool. Forged from 1-1/2" x 1/4" 1095, blade is 10 x 2, overall 15". So if you have pics of what your brining, feel free to show um here.
  13. Lamey

    Jungle Honey

    not sure about the weight, dont have an accurate way to measure. I can say that it feels very lively in the hand, substantial without being "heavy".
  14. Lamey

    Jungle Honey

    thanks all, they are a fun to make, a bit challenging on the heat treat, but still fun. Sam, no turks head, ive not yet mastered them (not a 4 strand anyway, and thats what this one would need). I am doing a Tsuba on one im building now. Some folks expressed concern over hands slipping on the handle, the way these are wrapped, and the shape of the tang (larger toward the edge), your hands wont slip, even if wet. I believe you would leave some skin behind before you actually slipped on the cord wrap. Will be posting a similar piece im working on in a week or so.
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