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Alan Longmire

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Everything posted by Alan Longmire

  1. If you've lined it with castable you don't need anything on top, unless you want to add an IR reflective coating like ITC-100 or Plistix. These can get you an extra hundred degrees or so, but are not usually necessary.
  2. I like the way that's heading.
  3. Tell your wife that you, sir, just won the awesomeness award for the week with that build.
  4. And he got it from Tai Goo, who in turn got it from some tribe in the Phillipines, who got it from somewhere in Indonesia/Maylaysia and so on... . A good idea is always good.
  5. I'd be annoyed. While it is theoretically possible to convert the pyrite to hematite or magnetite, you're still gonna have enough sulfur that any iron produced will be hot short. And there's that nasty sulfuric acid problem when you roast it...
  6. I thought this looked like you'd been watching Tod's Workshop. He's one of the best guys you can watch for this stuff.
  7. Get the eye white hot and sparking, and drift it at that heat. It probably won't reweld, but it will close the crack.
  8. Yes, but you really don't want to play with D2, S7, or A2 without a heat treat kiln. Air-hardening steels are great fun to forge since they harden as you're forging them. And a bucket of vermiculite is of no use with them.
  9. I'm assuming you mean 3mm, 3cm is 1.2 inches. And 3mm is thick enough for small knives, but D2 is not for the faint of heart. Somewhere around here there was a guy from Israel asking about heat treating it recently. Find that thread and see what you think.
  10. An unfortunate truth, but I am glad you realized it early on. . You are well on your way, and I suspect you'll do just fine.
  11. Cool! Your next task is to tune it to a neutral flame (the instant the dragon's breath disappears or turns yellowy-clear) and crank the PSI to 15. Retune for neutral flame, and see how hot you get.
  12. These things: http://www.graphimaterials.com/graphite-rods.html, go for the JC3s. They're expensive, but they're good to 3200 C and they won't contaminate the melt.
  13. I'm totally with Geoff. You should be able to research Robeson naval pattern knives from WWII easily enough. I've seen them with cast aluminum pommels, wonder if this was either early production, or maybe the original got knocked off and someone replaced it with a chunk of baseball bat? Looks like ash, in other words. Edit: They were issued with wooden pommels! Who knew? https://www.ima-usa.com/products/original-u-s-wwii-robeson-shuredge-no-20-usn-mki-fighting-knife-with-wood-pommel?variant=43580062021 https://www.ima-usa.com/products/original-u-s-wwii-navy-usn-mark-1-robeson-shuredge-no-20-fighting-knife-with-sheath?variant=6098572312614 A little Liburon brand #0000 steel wool (much finer and softer than any other #0000 brand) with a generous amount of a good gun oil might be okay to neutralize the rust, but that would be a no-no to a museum or serious collector. And not a whole lot of neat's foot, (which is also a conservation no-no, they prefer Lexol leather restorer or even pure glycerine because neat's foot often has corrosive petroleum stuff in it), just a drop or two every few weeks until the leather is no longer crunchy.
  14. Hmmm... This is just my opinion, and I am not an expert on these, nor have I tried to look them up yet, but: these have been "fixed up," and not necessarily in a good way. The Alexander is the least troubling to me, but you rarely if ever see one horn scale and one stag scale on the same blade, nor do you often see the same stamps on both sides of the blade. The belt hook is not a common thing, nor is the U.S. army button. The button is United States Army general service, used from ca. 1854-1875, which fits stylistically with the Bowie, which looks like a late period full tang, ca. 1860-1880. On top of that, the scabbard appears to be heavy leather sewn up the back? It should be cardboard or papier-mache with a cover of thin bookbinder's leather. Not that someone may not have had a better scabbard made for it, of course. Finally, the patina on the blade is suspiciously uniform. Best case scenario is it was purchased for use in the American Civil War and the owner had a scabbard made for it that reflected a pseudo-military aspect, and at some point many years later one of the stag scales fell off and was replaced with horn. Worst case, none of the above. The Wostenholme looks to be an outright fake from here. The mark is not right, the blade shape is not right, the cast nickel-silver frame handle is not right, and the horn on both of them looks like water buffalo rather than the cow it should be. Oddly enough, the purple scabbard is plausible. I'll do a little research as I have the time, and I would be delighted to be wrong about them. How did you come to have them?
  15. How did it do after half an hour at 6 PSI? Ideally you'd see little to no flame inside, just a nice yellow glow. If you've got that, hold off on further tinkering until you get used to it. Homemade gas forges are a steep learning curve, and it's best not to mess with too many variables at once.
  16. Slipped with the disk grinder and took 0.3mm too much off the end of my latest folder backspring. Just enough to ruin it.
  17. Welcome! I particularly like the first one.
  18. What pressure are you running? That still looks a bit rich, which is opposite problem most people have.
  19. LPG is easily able to get and hold temperatures for a cruxible furnace IF you use a blown burner. Venturis like that have the very issue you ran in to. With a blower freezing is no longer a problem. An oil burner is fine too, of course, and adds another level of niftiness. Congrats on the first semi-success! You need to stir the melt, or at least probe it to ensure everything is liquid. A carbon rod is ideal, but mild steel will work as long as you don't leave it in too long. You'll need a foundry glove and face shield, and don't turn the gas down. Just lean over, poke around gently, and stir gently. Any glass you drag in will float back up.
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