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Alan Longmire

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Status Replies posted by Alan Longmire

  1. Hello Alan I'm new to this and just bought my first Anvil and am wondering if you could help me figure out the age of it. Seems you are the go to for this, do you have the AIA book? Anyways it is a Trenton I believe a 110LBS, on the left side if looking at the horn is stamped Z 110 and on the right is what I believe is the serial number, A1563 

    Anvil1.htm Anvil1.htm

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      Hi Lonnie,

      I do have the book, and it tells me your anvil was made by Charles Zulty in 1898, the first year they were made by Columbus Forge and Iron Company of Columbus, Ohio.  Prior to that they were made by Boker in Germany and imported to the USA.  Yours should have a cast mild steel base welded to a forged mild steel body with a tool steel faceplate.  Your pictures didn't come through for some reason.  That's a very low serial number, by the way.  They made around 7000 anvils that year.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  2. Namaste, i am Ambar from Nepal, i am new here, we are kukri (nepali knife) maker, so i will teach more about bladesmiths..

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      Namaste!  Welcome.  We'd love to see your process!

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  3. 10 days and counting. As captain Mal said: Looks like a long wait for a train don't come.

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      Ah, I know what you're talking about now.  ;)

    2. (See 6 other replies to this status update)

  4. 10 days and counting. As captain Mal said: Looks like a long wait for a train don't come.

  5. Hi Alan, hope you are well & Happy new year ! 

    Is it possible you can assist me with a slight forum issue ? - I have forgotten my forum password - I can still log on with my work computer (hence access now :) ) - I can only do this as the computer has remembered the password, and shows it as a line of ************* when I log on.

    So, I would like to change my password, but in order to change my password, I need to enter my password, here in lies the problem - Dont know if this can be addressed from an administrators end ?

    All the best, John

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      John!  Good to hear from you!  I can change your password, but I can't see what it is currently.  Shoot me an email with your desired password at Alan.Longmire@tn.gov and I'll take care of it

  6. Hi Alan,

    I just bought a new 2x72” grinder and was wondering if you could tell me what types and grits of belts I should have on hand. I’ve been looking but there are so many different types.  

    Thank you Alan 

  7. I started preparing for a new hobby and got a Lancaster Geared Blower.  While trying to identify it and figure out how to take it apart, I ran across your picture (attached) of a similar blower.  The only difference I can see between mine and yours is my back plate says Lancaster and your's is smooth.  About how old is this piece?

    I'm trying to take the gears out for maintenance.  There appears to be a pin holding the top gear shaft.  Is that correct?  If so, how do you get it out.  I've had it soaking in penetrating oil and it hasn't budged.  There in barely enough pin to hold with vice grips so I'm afraid to do too much to it for fear it will break.  Am I on the right track?

     

    blower.jpg

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      Be prepared for leaks!  Note the oil puddle under mine.  The bearings are not sealed, which if good because the oil that gets flung around in the gearbox then flushes any dirt out of the bearings so things run well with little wear.  The downside is that the fan shaft and crank shaft ends leak oil when used.  

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  8. I started preparing for a new hobby and got a Lancaster Geared Blower.  While trying to identify it and figure out how to take it apart, I ran across your picture (attached) of a similar blower.  The only difference I can see between mine and yours is my back plate says Lancaster and your's is smooth.  About how old is this piece?

    I'm trying to take the gears out for maintenance.  There appears to be a pin holding the top gear shaft.  Is that correct?  If so, how do you get it out.  I've had it soaking in penetrating oil and it hasn't budged.  There in barely enough pin to hold with vice grips so I'm afraid to do too much to it for fear it will break.  Am I on the right track?

     

    blower.jpg

    1. Alan Longmire

      Alan Longmire

      Hey, Jim,

      These date between about 1880 and 1930 or so.  And whatever you do, DO NOT try to take the gear train apart!  What penetrating oil are you using?  PB B'Laster is the best I've used.  That blower in the picture was locked up tight after sitting outdoors for around 20 years. Half a can of B'Laster and four days later, it turns good as new.  I have heard kerosene is good too.  If all else fails, a quick hit with an acetylene torch, just enough to heat it quickly but not enough to turn colors, will often break loose a rusted joint.  Usually the problem isn't rust, but old grease that has fossilized in the bearings.  Heat can help with this as well.

      The bearings in these are of two types, bronze sleeves and loose balls.  None of them are standard sizes, which is why I do not recommend taking the gears out.  One the bearings are out it's nearly impossible to get them back in, and the loose balls are tiny and tend to spring out with high velocity, never to be seen again.  There is a bigger ball loose under that adjustment bolt visible just below the crank handle.  That bolt controls the backlash of the fan shaft and can be removed if you want, but don't lose the ball.  

      Finally, once you've got it free, use the lightest weight oil you can find in it.  These were designed to use straight mineral oil, about a 10w in our modern terms.  I like 0w-20, but I have heard automatic transmission fluid is good too.  I made the mistake of putting some 90w gear in one once and nearly broke my arm trying to crank it.

      Good luck!

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  9. Ah . . . that moment when you realize you forged the tang too short, and it's too thin to forge out longer. I keep telling myself I do this craft for the Zen. Yes. Very relaxing.

  10. another explosion of propane flask, neighbors starting to be worried, well most of those who survived

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