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robert washburn

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Posts posted by robert washburn

  1. DSC00901.JPGThese are a few small pieces that I have made for the average person that doesn`t have a lot to spend but,wants a hand made knife.they come with a pocket kydex sheath and come in 3 diffrent styles.

    DSC00903.JPG

  2. I'm going by The $50 Knife Shop method of heat treating, but I'm wondering if the edge quench does well with the toaster oven. Would be better to do a full quench, and do a full temper with T oven?

    Any advise for a beginner would be welcomed.

    Greg

    The oven will be fine. Robert

  3. I'm trying to decide if the 90# is enough or should I go for the large version? I don't want to cheap out but cost of shipping really is a consideration. Anyone using a 90# that can comment?

     

    Thanks Tim

    Frogfish,I have used a reguler anvil and one of the 90# ones of Chucks and had rather have Chucks.When I moved to Utah it was one of the first things I loaded. Robert

  4. The problem with putting hard material in the floor of the forge to protect it is that the hard stuff (brick, castable, steel, what have you) sucks up heat and makes the forge slow to come up to temp. My solution is two forges. I have a vertical that I do nearly all of my forging in, and a horizontal for welding projects (it doubles as the smaller of my two heat treat forges). That works pretty well for me.

     

    In the days when I only had one forge, I would put a kiln shelf in the bottom of the forge. The local pottery supply place has boxes of broken ones, I just found one about the right size and trimmed it with a tile saw.

     

    Geoff

    All you need to do is put cat litter in the bottom.When it gets full of flux and junk take it out and throw away.It will come out in one piece. Robert

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