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  1. this is the tanto-sized version of the mountain kotanto pattern... Satoyama are the managed forest areas that border the cultivated fields and the mountain wilds in Japan. Historically they provided fertilizer, firewood, edible plants, mushrooms, fish, and game, and supported local industries such as farming, construction, and charcoal making. Balancing the interaction of wetlands, streams, forests, and fields is an important component of the satoyama landscape and allows for sustainable use of the rich resources they offer. About the Tools for Satoyama Project (more: island
  2. Furusato (故郷, pronounced “foo-roo-sah-toe”) means home place or hometown and contains the ideas of being rooted or grounded wherever one may sojourn, and a confidence and longing for return. "When difficulties come, I remember my home place…Someday I shall fulfill my task. And, then, return to my home place. To the green mountains and clear rivers of my home." Takano Tatsuyuki, Furusato Materials for the wabisabi aikuchi style koshirae mounting include Tshikalakala (Wenge) wood for the kataki tsuka and saya, Hounoki (Japanese Magnolia) wood and cow horn for
  3. Back to some projects that were on pause for a few months while I relocated my workshop...here's the first: The inome (pronounced “ee-no-may”, 猪の目, eye of the boar) name comes from the pierced heart-shape designs on the decorative o-seppa (washers) on either side of the tsuba (handguard). This lovely motif is ubiquitous in Japan, seen often in architecture, furniture, and sword mountings. In this context, the inome symbol conveys the idea of the always forward-moving wild boar of Japan’s forests and mountains, never giving up or retreating. This tanto was forged from an antique horse-d
  4. Hi, I'm new here and new to knife making. I had been considering having a go at making knives for some time so a couple of months ago I jumped into it. I'm absolutely hooked! I've used O1 for these blades and recycled/native wood for handle scales. These are my first three knives. My first attempt is a general purpose hunter or camp knife with a 4" blade and recycled Teak handle. The next two I built simultaneously. The largest one I built for my workmate who wanted something to stick wild pigs. It's a 7" blade again with Teak handle. The smaller tanto style knife is a utility/EDC w
  5. Nearly finished with the rail clip tanto. Been a fun build utilising some new techniques and materials. The blade was a practice piece that turned out quite nice so I had to finish it lol. The fittings are made of salvaged copper pipe that I cut into sheets and hammered to shape. The fuchi and kashira are both one solid piece, no soldering. The materials used include a mokume tsuba, embossed leather inlay in lieu of ray skin, brazed copper habaki, copper fuchi and kashira, nylon cord, brass seppa, bamboo mekugi, handle body is a formed polymer product (experimental) and the blade is made from
  6. A true and accurate understanding of the past is an important step towards a good future. 温故知新 (on ko chi shin) is an expression that most directly translates to, "study the old to know the new". This blade began as a reclaimed piece of a damaged antique sword and was carefully hand forged in a charcoal fire, smoothed with files and a sen scraper, differentially hardened using traditional water quench yaki-ire, and polished by hand with natural Japanese water stones. Materials for the chisagatana style koshirae mounting include Japanese hounoki wood for the handle and scabbard, copper bus
  7. Hello, I want to share my new project. It will be a tanto style knife. I am not an expert in Japanese blades, only basic knowledge. However, I like the aesthetics and elegant design of those weapons so I decided to make one myself. I hope that real experts won't have a heart attack after seeing my version The blade is forged from NCV1 steel. Differential hardening was successful- the edge is hard and the spine is much much softer. I hope there will be a hamon visible.
  8. This is the second installation in my series of themed tanto, The Yuugure Kotanto. Here's the story: Yuugure means dusk or twilight, and this is what I tried to model the blade after. The saya has a dark black, ishimeji (or "stone") finish with blackened and brushed copper cladding. It reminds me of the night sky when the last orangey hues of the sunset are just beginning to fade away. The copper can appear very dark black or a bright orange depending on the angle it is viewed at, this coupled with the rough texture of the ishimeji creates a really interesting aesthetic. The haba
  9. Haven't posted on here in several years, but I thought this might be a fun blade to jump back on here with. This tanto was made from an Enfield Mark III barrel with a mild steel core forge welded into it. The idea was to mimic the kobuse forge welding scheme used in many Japanese swords. It was kind of an interesting process getting the hot core down the barrel during welding. If I did it over again, I might have done a few things differently in the forge welding process, but it seemed to work out okay. I did a video on my Youtube channel. I can add the link if anybody's interested in s
  10. Hi All, My first knife was not too good (tried to make from stainless, screwed up HT), but my second one I'm quite proud of. Made by stock removal from an old file (the one I dulled filing stainless....), using only hand tools, except for drilling the two holes in the handle. No Jigs used, mostly filing by hand (and eye) and using grindstones from my lansky-set to smooth the surfaces. HT done in purposebuilt charcoal forge from bricks, quench in sunflower oil. For my next one I hope to start with a bit of forging before I start the filing. video of het treat: 2
  11. Seeing as it has been awhile, here is a recent custom koshirae for a small antique tanto blade belonging to a client. Crimson lacquered samegawa handle, fukiurushi horn fittings, a silver mekugi, and polished black lacquer scabbard in a classical aikuchi style. Materials for the custom red and black aikuchi style koshirae mounting include lacquered samegawa over hounoki for the handle, a silver and copper mekugi, and lacquered buffalo horn fuchi, kashira, koiguchi, and kurikata. Overall length when sheathed is about 11.5″. Specifications 柄長 Tsuka: 3 sun 3 bu (100mm) 拵全長 Koshirae: 9 sun
  12. Hello, Recently, I have been trying to make my own tanto-style knife in the traditional form. Yesterday, I cut out the basic shape of the blade from 12" 1095 steel that is 1/4" thick. Then I refined the blank using an angle grinder and a 12" bastard file. Next, I marked my center line on the edge of the blank and proceeded to my rookie 4"x36" belt grinder. I started by grinding down to just above the thickness of the edge I want and then pulling that grind angle back until the bevel would touch the spine. At least, that was my plan when I ran out of grinder belts. Not wanting to give up,
  13. I was originally going for a wakizashi but metal wasnt playing nice with the extra length so back in the forge and straightened it out and shortened the blade for a long tanto. Forgot to take pics of forging process but pretty simple. This is it after final shaping of blade and filing out dents and Knicks. Tomorrow begins the terribly slow process of filing in the edge and fattening up that tang and hopefully get started on sanding the blade.
  14. This is the first installment in my series of themed tanto, The Autumn Grove Kotanto. My inspiration for this blade came in the form of the natural beauty of the forest and the changing colors of the leaves during fall. Drawing on the form of the mighty oak, this blade features a walnut shirasaya with cocobolo spacers that brings to mind the strength and stature of a full grown tree. The copper habaki has a traditional patina created by simmering in a hot niage solution. The speckled, rusty plum patina that the habaki takes on is reminiscent of vivid orange and brown leaves floating down a
  15. San mai of wrought iron shell with 15N20 and 1095 cutting edge. Handle window contains LEGO bricks tumbled at random angles before being sanded down to show their cross-sections. Black cotton ito with 3d printed cast brass menuki. I've been having a lot of fun with these window knives, and have another half dozen in the works.
  16. ...this project has been a long time coming but is finally off the ground...some of the background and concept: Satoyama are the managed forest areas that border the cultivated fields and the mountain wilds in Japan. Historically they provided fertilizer, firewood, edible plants, mushrooms, fish, and game, and supported local industries such as farming, construction, and charcoal making. Balancing the interaction of wetlands, streams, forests, and fields is an important component of the satoyama landscape and allows for sustainable use of the rich resources they offer. About the Tools
  17. Hey guys I just finished the shobu zukuri tanto up. It is forged from W1 round bar, the Habaki is copper and the shirasaya is basswood with an African Blackwood mekugi. I have learned a lot in making this and had a blast. I'm asking $350 please message me if you are interested! Thanks -Jeff
  18. Hey guys just wanted to share what I have been working on. Forged from 5/8" round W1 With a blade of around 6". Blade style is show zukuri. I know tango are generally Hirazukuri but I wanted to change it up a bit. Please tell me what you think and feel free to critique. The blade is in its rough filed state. I also want to mention that I have not started shaping the tang yet. Thanks for checking it out!
  19. Hello, everyone! Long time no post--I imagine most of the folks on here won't even remember me, these days . After forging my first knife under the guidance of Tai Goo about 7 years ago, I visited a couple local bladesmiths to help me learn a bit more, but after that, I dove into leatherworking because I was living in apartments and couldn't set up my own forge. Now, though, I have a house, so I built a forge and got myself a fairly wimpy little old anvil. Probably about 5 years ago, now, I visited Cris Anderson with a bar of 1084FG and a plan to make a tanto, and he helped me shape the ti
  20. The seed that began this project was the question of what would result if a historical Japanese knife maker working at a time when exposure to the west was very limited was asked to create a western style knife based only on a description. The resulting piece retains the lines and techniques that would have been familiar to the maker, but incorporates the most obvious elements of the foreign style which would have been transmitted in that description. The wide guard and hardwood handle would have been immediately recognizable to a western traveler, but the construction of the scabbard and
  21. Finally dinished this tanto...I reworked the polish and it looks so much nicer now.
  22. Hey guys their tanto is nearly finished...the only thing I need to food run put the lacquer. If you guys could give me any pointers on how to make it better I would appreciate it! Steel is W2 the motohaba is a hair over an 1"the nagasa is about 8.5", saya is curly walnut with glooss lacquer and the mekugi is antler
  23. Hey guys as you know I am working on a shirasaya for the tango I forged. I was wondering how the location of the mekugi ana is determined. I understand that it should be located on the 2nd diamond but I am first making a shirasaya and then full mounts. It will be a while before I gather enough cash to purchase the required materials so I don't understand how to determine the location of the hole. Can I use a regular drill bit or is a tapered one preferred? If so what size and where can I buy it? Thanks. -Jeff
  24. So I have been out of sorts as of late and I have been feeling wore out from working on customer blades and just trying to be happy about what I do. So I decided to do my first, what I want to call a true Japanese katana using no mechanical means at all. So here is the first in a series of videos on the forging of my first Oroshigane / Tamahagane Katana the billet was made for me by Ilya of the Baltimore Knife Works thanks Ilya Forging the Sunobe https://youtu.be/XbYwVvc9g_A Forging the Nakago https://youtu.be/YtkFOLJVmcQ Forging the Mune Part 1 https://youtu.be
  25. Hey guys I hear treated this tanto last night and decided to give it a test etch before I grind it down. Still need to do a little straightening and the hamon runs off very close to the machi but overall I'm stunned. Tell me what you think and feel free to critique!
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