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my latest wakizashi


Walter Sorrells

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I guess the topic title pretty much tells the story. This one's 21 inches made from high layer forge welded W2/1095 steel. It's part of a set of three blades, the other two of which I've shown here at various other points.

 

Incidently, the habaki is made from solid fine silver. I used to use sterling silver for habakis, but I had a bunch of them crack on me after soldering. Apparently I wasn't annealing them right -- though I was doing what all the technical manuals said you were supposed to do. Or maybe the repeated forming operations, followed by annealing, followed by soldering was causing grain growth. I don't know. Anyway, I was bitching about this problem to Rick Barrett a year or so ago and he suggested I use fine (99.5+ percent pure) silver. It anneals at much lower temps than sterling. Haven't had any cracking problems since.

 

pgp_wak_omote.jpg

 

pgp_hamon2.jpg

 

pgp_hamon4.jpg

 

pgp_hamon1.jpg

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Hi Walter,

Would you mind commenting on the steel mix, and how it might look different if you just used one or the other in a high layer count blade?

 

Thanks for taking the time to show your great work.

 

Take care, Craig

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Walter,

i am always amazed by your blades,

i love the flow of the steel and the interesting hamon, just so much more dynamic than a mono steel blade.

a real insiration.

 

how much silver is needed for a habaki like that? and do you do lost wax casting? is do, what do you use for the mold? and a crucible?

thanks!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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Walter,

i am always amazed by your blades,

i love the flow of the steel and the interesting hamon, just so much more dynamic than a mono steel blade.

a real insiration.

 

how much silver is needed for a habaki like that? and do you do lost wax casting? is do, what do you use for the mold? and a crucible?

thanks!

~Chris

 

I do quite a bit of cast habaki, check out my website under process. If you need more details, let me know.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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That´s GOOD looking blade,hada is smooth and tight.

If you dont mind my asking...how thigh was the starting point material?

 

Niko

 

If I'm understanding your question about how thick the starting material was -- I used 1/8" (roughly 2mm) thick stock. So the original stack had somewhere around 15 pieces of steel. Then I welded it, drew it out, folded it and rewelded it seven or eight times.

 

how much silver is needed for a habaki like that? and do you do lost wax casting? is do, what do you use for the mold? and a crucible?

thanks!

~Chris

 

Traditionally habakis are generally cold forged, rather than cast. They're pretty much a big pain in the neck to make. I got in the habit of making them because they force you to make the nakago properly. If your nakago isn't made right, the habaki won't fit. I use 10 gauge silver plate. With copper habakis I use 1/8" X 1" bar. Jesus Hernandez has a tutorial that will give you the general outlines of how to do it. I don't do it exactly the way he does -- I've got a little gizmo that I made to improve the forging and bending process -- but his general procedure is similar to mine.

 

 

Just beautiful, Walter. Neat little hard spot you got there... what do you think caused it? Clay pop off in heat treatment before you got to the quench?

 

Sometimes you'll get a little area that you intended to be part of the choji design where the neck of the "flower" ends up not hardening, leaving a little isolated hard spot. I think that's what happened here. If it had come out exactly as planned, it would have just been part of the choji design. But that's one of the cool things about making hamons. You never know what they're gonna do!

 

Would you mind commenting on the steel mix, and how it might look different if you just used one or the other in a high layer count blade?

 

The W2/1095 mix is quite subtle as it is. You really have to look at it in perfect lighting to reveal the hada that you see in these photos. W2 and 1095 are quite similar steels. But, of course, they aren't exactly the same, so you get a little bit of difference between them. If I had just used 1095, say, it would even harder to see the pattern. You always get a little decarb and some other things that will make some layers stick out more than others...but if you're looking for a bold pattern, you definitely want to use dissimilar steels.

Edited by Walter Sorrells

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Just too sexy! Very nice.

My life is like shaving with a razor sharp machete. It's a bit awkward and I feel a sting every now and then, but in the end I'm happy with the results.

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  • 10 months later...

excellent blade! It will be a long time before i learn how to make a kissaki, let alone an o-kissaki. one day! :lol:

"I reject your reality and substitute my own" -Adam Savage

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very nice Walter as always. Thank you for sharing.

"One who is samurai must before all things" Keep constantly in mind, by day and by night. the fact that he has to die...

 

-Dai Doji Yuzon-

16th Century

 

http://sites.google.com/site/canadianliveblade/home

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