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I need some advice on how to forge a spoon bit auger. I have had no luck finding info on the web as far as forging them. I can forge a spoon rather well and was wondering if there is any tricks to this auger type as i have not forged one before. Also is there a particular way of sharpening them? i need to forge a set of all standard sizes for a customer and took it on as a challenge.

 

here is a nice pair of antique ones i have found on ebay but not the right sizes.

spoon_bits.JPG

spoonbit1.JPG

spoonbit2.JPG

spoonbit3.JPG

spoonbit4.JPG

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I found some pictures of completed bits, which may perhaps help. Here's another spoon bit.

 

I also found a forum for Traditional Tools. It looks interesting, and you might find more info there.

 

the woodworking site has alot of neat tools i can forge but a search turned up no spoon bits. so i posted something and we'll see what happens there.

 

so.. is this type just a forge out a spoon and sharpen the inside curve or is there more to it? I'd hate to forge these out and have them be useless. planed on a set of 12.

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i'm not sure, but i think they're pretty much just spoons with maybe a more defined point that have been sharpened on the edges, i'd try to make a little one and see if it'd work.

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They're spoons,but the bevel is strictly on the outside.About the 160 or so degrees of the bottom curve is sharpened.They came in a zillion of different shapes,specific to the job.Like any barefooted auger their specialty is to not be led by the grain of the wood,so to allow the hole to enter the work at any angle.Mortising the upright spindles into a chair seat,for example.I'd go ahead and try making one,you'd know immediateli where to go from there.Good luck.

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Hello,

 

I made about 50 similar tools for a folk school last year. They were used by guys making wooden shoes.

Because I had to make a bunch of them, I made a die like this one:

 

matrice_couteaux.jpg

 

That's the female part, made by me , a friend and a sledge. the male part was made by grinding a piece of round stock to the inner shape.

 

The only thing i would add to what Jake said it is to make sure to give a good blue temper to the spoon/handle junction.

Be careful to make the transition smooth and clean to avoid cracks and folds.

 

They are quite a bit of work on the finihing part, but fun to make!

 

Antoine

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Hello,

 

I made about 50 similar tools for a folk school last year. They were used by guys making wooden shoes.

Because I had to make a bunch of them, I made a die like this one:

 

matrice_couteaux.jpg

 

That's the female part, made by me , a friend and a sledge. the male part was made by grinding a piece of round stock to the inner shape.

 

The only thing i would add to what Jake said it is to make sure to give a good blue temper to the spoon/handle junction.

Be careful to make the transition smooth and clean to avoid cracks and folds.

 

They are quite a bit of work on the finishing part, but fun to make!

 

Antoine

 

 

nice, and thank you this has been the best info so far. its just so old technology no one makes these by hand anymore unless called on. :rolleyes:

 

I figured it would be a about 40 hours on 12 different spoons. but i am am getting a full on viking canvas tent w/ frame and all (10x12 footprint). it all works out in the end.

 

how do you figure for the amount of steel to the spoon size?

do have one of those dies lying about for sale or trade?

sharpeing from the back huh... well thats easier than the modern ones that you have to sharpen on the inside curve, yey! but is that cutting egde or area on a clock kinda 160 degrees. ie so the tip is sharp but not the sides or ????.............

 

Is there anyhting else i should know before i start? (no wise guys plz)

 

maybe this calls for a trip to the salvation army for a spoon experiment. :ph34r:

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nice, and thank you this has been the best info so far. its just so old technology no one makes these by hand anymore unless called on. :rolleyes:

 

I figured it would be a about 40 hours on 12 different spoons. but i am am getting a full on viking canvas tent w/ frame and all (10x12 footprint). it all works out in the end.

 

how do you figure for the amount of steel to the spoon size?

do have one of those dies lying about for sale or trade?

sharpeing from the back huh... well thats easier than the modern ones that you have to sharpen on the inside curve, yey! but is that cutting egde or area on a clock kinda 160 degrees. ie so the tip is sharp but not the sides or ????.............

 

Is there anyhting else i should know before i start? (no wise guys plz)

 

maybe this calls for a trip to the salvation army for a spoon experiment. :ph34r:

 

 

You are welcome!

 

When I made them I had models for each size; tools made in Ireland in 1880something. If I remember correctly, the biggest size bar was 5/8 round, the smallest 1/2 inch (it was forged down a dit in diameter). But each set of tools made was different. You'll have to see that with your client, he might have preferences.

When I make a tool like that for the first time I make one out of mild steel just to see out it works out for the forging steps and stock size. I always make the biggest or smallest one and go up or down from that.

The one given to me for model clearly were made by a single blacksmith or a small shop. Not machine made, so that gives you a bit of room.

 

The ones I made were sharp all around, the shoes makers tools were like that. Maybe used in another context it would be different but I don't think so.

 

Good luck and have fun!!

 

Antoine

 

Oh, sorry have to keep the dies, might have some more to make sorry... :)

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