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MrBaz

Chef Knife

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Just a rough mock-up of a chef knife I'm designing. Thinking of 1095 w/ hammon. Brass bolsters and stabilized redwood burl scales. Mosaic pins.

6" blade length. 1 1/2" blade height and 3/16" thick at the spine. Standard flat grind. This will be a little bit larger chopper, so it's going to be a little bigger than just 1/4" at the bolsters. I free-handed the blade design, but based everything else off of measurements from other cooking knives I have around the house.

Tell me what you think.

chef_2.jpg

Edited by MrBaz

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Just a rough mock-up of a chef knife I'm designing. Thinking of 1095 w/ hammon. Brass bolsters and stabilized redwood burl scales. Mosaic pins.

Tell me what you think.

How long is the blade? How thick of 1095 are you going to use? Convex or flat grind?. The over all drawing looks great.

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your drawing looks good!

I was chef in another life :)...your blade should be aroud 25/28 cm long, 6 tot 7 cm high and 5 mm thick at the bolsters!

no ricaaso and flat ground.

I would have inox pins instead of mosaïc ones...more hygienic to work in the kitchen...

my 2 cents :):):)

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Updated my original post with more details.

 

Inox pins eh? Never heard of them. How are they more hygienic to work with? The Mosaic pins are just different metals and epoxy.

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yes, of course !

inox can better be cleaned and you have less riks of bacteriological contamination.

oxydation of metals is also not very good for food.

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yes, of course !

inox can better be cleaned and you have less riks of bacteriological contamination.

oxydation of metals is also not very good for food.

 

Where can one purchase these pins?

Edited by MrBaz

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"inox" is European for stainless. ;)

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"inox" is European for stainless. ;)

 

Ah. I'll just stick with mosaic pins then. It's not like the pins will be touching the food.

Edited by MrBaz

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The Pins touch your hand, your hand touches the food. Hygiene in the kitchen is important is so many ways.

 

~Justin

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The Pins touch your hand, your hand touches the food. Hygiene in the kitchen is important is so many ways.

 

~Justin

 

Your hands touch so many other things in the kitchen that are worse for your health than the handle of a knife. A well kept knife will never have any of these problems.

Honestly, how many people here have knives where the pins are corroding to the point it is a health risk? Seriously now.

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If it were being sold into a commercial kitchen, I'd agree on the stainless...even on the blade itself. But around my house, well, I'm just a simple country boy. I don't exactly scrub for surgery before coming to the table. Between me, 3 kids and a dog and the house, I'd have little concern for the mozaics.

 

I think the drawing looks great. Looking forward to seeing the finished work.

 

JV

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If it were being sold into a commercial kitchen, I'd agree on the stainless...even on the blade itself. But around my house, well, I'm just a simple country boy. I don't exactly scrub for surgery before coming to the table. Between me, 3 kids and a dog and the house, I'd have little concern for the mozaics.

 

I think the drawing looks great. Looking forward to seeing the finished work.

 

JV

 

I agree on the commercial part. But seeing as there are tons of companies punching out (literally) endless variations of boring stainless steel knives with plastic handless and stainless pins, it doesn't strike me as a good idea to make the same cookie-cutter knife that anyone can go to Walmart and purchase. My goal is to make something that is fully functional, as well as pleasing to simply look at.

 

A person who appreciates a work of art in the form of a tool puts forth the effort to provide proper care for such tool.

Edited by MrBaz

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Guest Kyle Hershey

I worked as a certified chef for 3 years, and let me tell you, chefs are very particular about what metals touch food, and hands for that matter. If you wish to market this knife as a high end chef's knife, you need to take into consideration the needs of the hygenic chef. Most chefs will turn their nose up at a plain high carbon blade, because it will dis-color vegetables & fruit, and need constant oiling & polishing etc... Not to mention brass, which is the enemy of all foods. Or intricate areas that may harbor bacteria, like a mosaic pin.

 

Now if you make a cleaver with a high carbon blade that would be used for meats, that would be an exception. Most chefs prefer a good high carbon blade for meats, including fish as long as they are not in a saltwater environment.

 

Oh, and copper is an acceptable metal for kitchen knives.

 

You have a great design idea! Just ask around, talk to some cooks, and chefs. See what they like, and dislike about kitchen knives. After all they are the ones swinging the steel all day.

Edited by Kyle Hershey

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I worked as a certified chef for 3 years, and let me tell you, chefs are very particular about what metals touch food, and hands for that matter. If you wish to market this knife as a high end chef's knife, you need to take into consideration the needs of the hygenic chef. Most chefs will turn their nose up at a plain high carbon blade, because it will dis-color vegetables & fruit, and need constant oiling & polishing etc... Not to mention brass, which is the enemy of all foods. Or intricate areas that may harbor bacteria, like a mosaic pin.

 

Now if you make a cleaver with a high carbon blade that would be used for meats, that would be an exception. Most chefs prefer a good high carbon blade for meats, including fish as long as they are not in a saltwater environment.

 

Oh, and copper is an acceptable metal for kitchen knives.

 

You have a great design idea! Just ask around, talk to some cooks, and chefs. See what they like, and dislike about kitchen knives. After all they are the ones swinging the steel all day.

 

 

Thanks for the info. This isn't to be marketed. Just going to make a few for family/friends. Definitely not marketed to commercial chefs.

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Guest Kyle Hershey

Then just go for it!!! :D Make sure you share some pictures!!

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I've been comparing, and I think Nickel Silver would look just as good in place of the brass bolsters. Do you think it would be a good switch?

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I've been comparing, and I think Nickel Silver would look just as good in place of the brass bolsters. Do you think it would be a good switch?

 

 

Nickel silver sucks. It scratches just looking at it. Use some 416 stainless for the fittings. Easy to get, easy to work and polish's up nicely. The design looks good to me. And the mosaic pins are nice to. They are solid metal and epoxy so nothing should be able to get in the shouldn't, and people seem to like them. Let us see when they are done.

 

Tony G

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Nickel silver sucks. It scratches just looking at it. Use some 416 stainless for the fittings. Easy to get, easy to work and polish's up nicely. The design looks good to me. And the mosaic pins are nice to. They are solid metal and epoxy so nothing should be able to get in the shouldn't, and people seem to like them. Let us see when they are done.

 

Tony G

 

Ah. Excellent. For some reason I forgot about SS. Gosh my brain has been on the fritz lately. :excl:

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