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Hello,

I am Doug Adams from Carrollton, Georgia. I am just starting out trying to make some knives. This afternoon I epoxied on some g 10 scales. I had glue everywhere. i would of hated to get that much glue on some exspensive handle material. Could someone give me some tips or tell me where to look to see how to do it. Also what is best to use to glue scales on?

thanks,

doug

jn 3:16

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Hello,

I am Doug Adams from Carrollton, Georgia. I am just starting out trying to make some knives. This afternoon I epoxied on some g 10 scales. I had glue everywhere. i would of hated to get that much glue on some exspensive handle material. Could someone give me some tips or tell me where to look to see how to do it. Also what is best to use to glue scales on?

thanks,

doug

jn 3:16

 

 

Most people use 5min or 30min epoxy. It has incredible holding strength, and is pretty thick. As far as getting glue everywhere, you shouldn't be finishing your scales unmounted.

Cut out a rough profile and pin/glue them to the tang. THEN do your finishing work.

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Most people use 5min or 30min epoxy. It has incredible holding strength, and is pretty thick. As far as getting glue everywhere, you shouldn't be finishing your scales unmounted.

Cut out a rough profile and pin/glue them to the tang. THEN do your finishing work.

 

thanks for the reply. i should of said when i was glueing the scales to the tang i got glue everywhere.

Doug

Jn. 3:16

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Hmm.

 

I've finished out scales on several occasions and epoxied them afterwards. Just a matter of preference. Careful application and a good wipe down of the epoxy is necessary to keep it from getting everywhere. If you are not really careful, you may have to do some sanding afterward. If you are very careful with the amount of epoxy you can get away with just flaking the slight bit of excess off with a sharp tool without damaging the finish.

 

Many occasions have prevented me from being able to conveniently finish all of the components of a handle while it is on the knife, and other configurations have made finishing the scales on the knife desirable. Both can be successful strategies.

 

 

Most people use 5min or 30min epoxy. It has incredible holding strength, and is pretty thick. As far as getting glue everywhere, you shouldn't be finishing your scales unmounted.

Cut out a rough profile and pin/glue them to the tang. THEN do your finishing work.

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I use Acraglass from Brownells. It's the stuff gunsmiths use to bed rifle barrels. It's a little thinner than most of the epoxies, which means that it fills holes better, but may not be the stuff you want for slab handles. I don't do many slab handle knives. According to the stat sheets it has a 50 year guarantee in use, and a 5 year shelf life. Most of the epoxies are 5 and 1 year.

 

In general, the faster an epoxy sets, the weaker it is. I have had a handle bonded with 5 minute epoxy pop off. It's possible (likely, even) that this was operator error, but I like the slower stuff better.

 

I do two things I think help with clean up. First, I coat the non bonding parts of the handle. knife, and fittings with Vaseline. That way, if glue gets where you don't want, it won't stick. Second, I go back to the piece an hour or so later (your time may vary, an hour to 3 is good for Acraglass) and using a hardwood scraper, I take off all of the glue that I can. At that point, it's like rubber cement and comes off fairly easily.

 

I often finish a handle 90% or better, and then assemble the pieces, but then again, I don't do all that many slab handles.

 

Geoff

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With some knives it is necessary to have everything shaped and finished before gluing.

 

My trick is to epoxy everything together, then wipe off as much excess as possible. Let it set for a few minutes, checking the consistency of the epoxy as it cures. Once it gets to the 'gummy' stage, I take a scrap piece of wood shaped like a chisel, and proceed to carefully scrape the excess away with the wooden tool. Once the epoxy gets gummy, it will lift right off.

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Doug,

I use 5 minute epoxy for hidden tang knives and longer acting 2-ton for scales. The 2-ton allows you to align the scales and set the rivets and still have plenty of time to wipe off the excess epoxy and with a slightly moist rag with acetone for the final clean-up.

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Doug, where are you at in Carrolton

 

I'm in Acworth, you should come by sometime, the August meeting of the Alex Bealer Blacksmith Association is at my shop, its a great opportunity to meet metal heads and ask questions and stuff.

 

Stephan

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thanks for the replies. What brands of epoxy do yall like and where do you get it. Where does the 2 ton come from.

Doug

Jn. 3:16

For hidden tangs I use JB Weld, but it shows a gray glue line if used on slabs. For slabs, I rely on peinned pens for a mechanical bond, and use a slow cure epoxy more as a sealer than the agent holding the handle together. I don't really have a favorite brand. There is a thread here, and a huge thread on the subject over at the knife network, and doubtless many more.

 

Many epoxies have a short shelf life.

Edited by GEzell
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