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TOBY

Feathered W's

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well a tutorial of sorts.....

first up is to make some w's, this is a stack of eleven layers of 15n20 and C20

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weld it up then turn it through 90deg(has been forged out a little)

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photo of fire at welding temp;) :D

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drawn out to twelve inches by about 3/8-1/2" thick

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sectioned out into four bits ready for the first stack

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said stack ready for welding

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all welded up - now just got to do this all over another three times

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after all that stacking and welding the billet is sectioned into six

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and stacked up ready for welding

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billet all welded up - this is our W's made

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a quick etch to show what a compressed stack of w's look like(only ground with angle grinder sorry)

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billet all cleaned up - VERY important to keep a reference of where everything is at All times as it is so easy to mess everything up all the way to the end of the process

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handle has been moved to the side and our Precious billet of w's has been hacked into nearly two with a very blunt cutter(about 4mm thick at cutting edge)

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handle moved again then welded it back up into one block again (make sure you do EVERYTHING at welding temperature) i diddnt have it hot enough when closing up the two sides and started to open up a weld - managed to stop it and weld it back up, but best to do it right first time!

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the billet has been drawn out to 7 1/2" long by 3/8" thick by 1 1/2" wide, and is now cooling on the forge floor, will give it a bit of a grind and a quick etch tomorow to see if we have destroyed a perfectely good billet of W's:O :lol:

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A few pic's of the billet from the last pic now etched -

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the billet is still a bit compressed and will spread out a bit yet when it is drawn out, but it is an example of a feather pattern now all thats left to do is to make it into something sharp :)

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Wow looks great, thanks for sharing your technique.

Chris

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Thanks TOBY! I just love patterning tutorials, and that's one I was a bit vague about. Great explanation, and a beautiful billet. Please let us see what you make with it!

 

Luke

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Thanks Toby,

 

This is brilliant.

You told me how when we met, but my foggy brain did not take it all in.

Now I am hooked.

 

I need to see how this looks when shaped into a longer blade. Perhaps hollow ground.

 

Great tutorial, Toby!

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Great job Toby, thank you for taking the time to post the tutorial. Could you post a picture of the tool you used to cut the stack with? Much appreciated.

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wooow.... it looks great! Thank you very much fot the tutorial.

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Wow! :blink::ph34r::huh::blink:

 

That's just too spiffy! I see it in a wavy blade like a kris...Just to get really organic-looking. ;)

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Great job Toby, thank you for taking the time to post the tutorial. Could you post a picture of the tool you used to cut the stack with? Much appreciated.

A picture of the cutting tool...? ah now thats a trade secret :lol:

 

 

 

 

its just a bit of truck leaf spring welded onto a handle with the edge profiled a bit ;)

Image013-1.jpg

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A picture of the cutting tool...? ah now thats a trade secret :lol:

 

 

 

 

its just a bit of truck leaf spring welded onto a handle with the edge profiled a bit ;)

Image013-1.jpg

 

Finish this thing yet?

Got me wanting to go out and build a forge

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Finish this thing yet?

Got me wanting to go out and build a forge

 

:lol: not yet, this piece was for a commission and only made a 8" blade, so its sat on the shelf att.

The commision was for a 9 1/2" blade - have made some more steel (tweaked the mix a bit) and roughed out the blade only so far

 

Image007-2.jpg

 

and a rough idea of the pattern

 

Image021.jpg

 

now go build a forge and have a go! :D

Edited by TOBY

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Hi

 

Toby, amaising work

 

This is great tutorial...THANK YOU for the topic.

I have tryed this and allways made last turn wrong way :lol:

 

This is great topic....is it pinned all ready???

 

Niko

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Guest Kyle Hershey

Damn that is a fine tutorial!

 

I assume c20 is carlson alloy, pretty amazing stuff by the looks of the composition. When you mix it with 15n20 does that raise the overall austenization temperature, or does it even matter because there is hardly any carbon in the c20?

 

I'm a functional greenhorn, but a greenhorn none the less. Thank you Toby!

Edited by Kyle Hershey

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I assume c20 is carlson alloy, pretty amazing stuff by the looks of the composition. When you mix it with 15n20 does that raise the overall austenization temperature, or does it even matter because there is hardly any carbon in the c20?

thanks Kyle :D

C20 is an Udderholm steel very similar to 15n20 without the nickel, same carbon content etc (somewhat like 1080) its not the carlson stainless that you are thinking of

 

rgds

TOBY

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Guest Kyle Hershey

Thank you sir!! I apreciate the help!

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Wow that is awesome! I'll have to try that one day when my skill catches up with my head. :wacko:

Edited by maolan

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I love that pattern, but am not quite clear on some of the orientation.

It looks like you weld the bar edges facing up at stages.

It's a beautiful pattern, I'd love to make some.

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Hi David,

the bar ends (where the pattern is) is only ever facing up when the billet is completed and is being drawn out into bar stock/knife blade

 

oh... a pic showing the orientation of billet when hot cutting (please note- this is not what the billet above would look like if etched. the above would be a LOT more compressed and dense, its purely for example to show which way the w's go)

 

p1010618_1.jpg

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Hi David,

the bar ends (where the pattern is) is only ever facing up when the billet is completed and is being drawn out into bar stock/knife blade

 

oh... a pic showing the orientation of billet when hot cutting (please note- this is not what the billet above would look like if etched. the above would be a LOT more compressed and dense, its purely for example to show which way the w's go)

 

p1010618_1.jpg

 

Thanks Toby.

I'll study the process some more.

I'm an old fart and things take a while to sink in.

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OK, so I am trying to get this thing straight in my head. Uou do the first forge weld and cut it and stack the pices edge to edge right? Do this 4 times or so, this is done with the handle still welded on the end of the billet. The handle is then moved to the Bottom? of the billet and it is cut along the edges in the first pic? Great info, this has really got me thinking.

thanks for the help

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The handle is moved to the side. I'd been trying to work it out in my head as well and the photo posted above did help. After cutting and rewelding the chisel cut, you'd move the handle to what was originally the top or bottom of the billet to draw it out. Which would have been the top of the chisel cut or the bottom of it.

 

Least that's what I'm understanding.

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The handle is moved to the side. I'd been trying to work it out in my head as well and the photo posted above did help. After cutting and rewelding the chisel cut, you'd move the handle to what was originally the top or bottom of the billet to draw it out. Which would have been the top of the chisel cut or the bottom of it.

 

Least that's what I'm understanding.

 

Yeh thats correct.

the handle stays in the same place up to the final stack then it might have to be moved around a bit to square everything up. then moved to the side to be hot cut, then back to the end of the billet for welding shut and drawing out.

a tip i learnt of Mick Maxen was to use flat bar as a handle (rather than round or square) to help remember where everything is.

Edited by TOBY

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