Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Tai

steel type

Recommended Posts

ok, i know I've asked a fair amount of questions lately, but this one goes along with the last.  I have a local steel store here that sells 1050, and I know that Don used it in his Katana class and said it worked well. But, I'm really interested in functional, quality products and even though half of what i make will never be used, I was wondering if you all thought that 1050 was good enough or if i should just order high carbon like 1095 or something along those lines?  I also realize that i have experience with knives, but not the fullered and hollow ground sword that i want to make so i will screw up a few times at least so it might not be worth the money...thoughts? thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Tai
I think you can make a good functional blade from 1050 as long as you use suitable geometry and heat treating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1050 is a good steel to learn on because it forges easily and is simple to heat treat. The max hardness on the steel is 58 hrc, but that is fine for most uses. The only real problem with it is that if you differentially harden a long blade the back structure is not tough enough and it will take a set easily. In swords this means that it will bend on almost every cut.  

 

There are work arounds to stiffen the back. Bob Engnath use to harden the spine. I would not discount 1050 especially if you are new to sword making. The higher carbon steels are very difficult to harden successfully in long lengths with a high part loss ratio.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Tai
Don, what quenching medium do you reccomend for 1050? I've had the best results with water, with the ones I've done, but haven't used a lot of 1050.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Tai
I want to add that even short edged quenched blades will take a set or bend if flexed, especially thin blades. I think a total quench or deep edge quench is best, at least from my work with it. One nice thing is that it is easy to straighten if it warps in heat treating, not much to worry about there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thats good to hear.  I have a ready supply of 1050 so that will make it simple.  I've just seen too many swords that get nasty, deep dents from the two by four test and don't want to have that problem myself.  True, the sword will never be used, but the great thing about bladesmithing when aproached from a functional view point is that you have to play by the rules, and in doing so you come up with work that has more depth... at least that is how i see it.  Thanks again for the replies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...