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Barrett X. Houston

Drifting without a hardy hole?

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Well, its 4:46 in the morning and I've got insomnia, so I might as well make a post :).

 

I want to try to make a tomahawk out of some railroad spikes I found but I'm not blessed with an large anvil with a hardy hole. Do you guys have any ideas on what I could drift into?

 

I think I saw on a hatchet tutorial where the tutorial maker was drifting his axe head on a vice. You guys have any idea?

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While I dont have alot of experience in this department I did make a few tomahawks this winter using ballpeen hammer heads and My drift was too large for my hardy hole so I used a big vice as you recommended. Worked well enough for me to get the job done.

Chris

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A large vise would work, or if you need a special drifting anvil, go get an old sledgehammer from a yard sale, lose the handle, and use the large eye as your hole... grind the top flat for a small anvil surface, and sink it halfway or so in cement, maybe with a removable plug under the hole so there's more drop space. Just a thought.

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I generally demo how to drift without a vise or hardy hole when I do a hawk or axe demo. I'd tell you, but according to your sig line and your avatar you don't really want to know.

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you can use a vise also check at a machine shop for any various pieces of steel w/ holes in them that would work

Edited by Ty Murch

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After getting the drift started in the slit, hold the piece with the drift horizontal. Hold the spike in such a way that the spike catches the edge of the anvil, and the drift rides just on top of the anvil face so to speak. Drive the drift in until you need another heat, knock the drift out, take a heat and repeat. Alternate which side hits the edge of the anvil, just to keep things sort of even. It's a lot easier than it sounds. Hope this helps.

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you could use a piece of flattened scaffold pole was shown that and you can cut it to a height most suited to you not dictated by vice or anvil

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Thanks everybody, I kinda of like the Sledge hammer idea. With the whole "drifting horizontally on the edge of the anvil" thing, could mar the spike? Maybe not on a big anvil but right now I'm using a piece of hardened I beam as an anvil.

 

I hope I didn't piss you off with my smartass behavior Alan Longmire, its all in good fun :).

Edited by Barrett X. Houston

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Thanks everybody, I kinda of like the Sledge hammer idea. With the whole "drifting horizontally on the edge of the anvil" thing, could mar the spike? Maybe not on a big anvil but right now I'm using a piece of hardened I beam as an anvil.

 

I hope I didn't piss you off with my smartass behavior Alan Longmire, its all in good fun :).

 

Well, I did think having a sig line that implied no respect for opinion was kind of stupid when you're asking for advice. I'm quite the smartass too, I just save it for face-to-face or for people I know better. ;)

 

Thanks for changing it.

 

Now then, What I do is basically what Donnie describes, except I'll do it vertically if the anvil has good edges. It will deform the "ears" of the hole a bit, but you can just forge 'em back to shape on the drift when you're done. You lay the curve of the edge on top of or alongside the anvil face while you're drifting, with the spike head hanging off the corner if you want to keep the head on. It's hard to straighten out a bend at the eye with just a hammer, you almost need a handled fuller to pound on.

 

I should take some pictures one of these days...

 

Maybe somebody at the Kentucky hammerin this weekend will do the honors for me, hint hint... B)

 

Oh, and I've forged on a big hunk of H-beam, so I know whereof you speak. Just be sure to round off all the sharp edges, that really helps keep stuff from getting too dinged up.

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